Faculty


Speaker
Educational Session
"Complementary treatments"

Donald I. Abrams, MD
Professor Emeritus of Medicine
University California San Francisco

Donald I. Abrams, MD. is a Professor Emeritus of Medicine at the University of California San Francisco. He has an Integrative Oncology consultation practice at the UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine. He received an A.B. in Molecular Biology from Brown University in 1972 and graduated from the Stanford University School of Medicine in 1977. After completing an Internal Medicine residency at the Kaiser Foundation Hospital in San Francisco, he became a fellow in Hematology/Oncology at the Cancer Research Institute of the University of California, San Francisco in 1980. He was one the original clinician/investigators to recognize and define many early AIDS-related conditions at San Francisco General Hospital where he also served as chief of Hematology-Oncology for 14 years. He has long been interested in clinical trials of complementary and alternative medicine interventions for HIV/AIDS and cancer, including evaluations of medicinal cannabis. In 1997 he received funding from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to conduct a clinical trial on the short-term safety of cannabinoids in HIV infection. Subsequently he was granted funds by the University of California Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research to continue studies of the effectiveness of cannabis in a number of clinical conditions. He completed a placebo-controlled study of smoked cannabis in patients with painful HIV-related peripheral neuropathy as well as a study evaluating vaporization as a smokeless delivery system for medicinal cannabis. He conducted a NIDA-funded trial investigating the pharmacokinetic interaction between vaporized cannabis and opioid analgesics in patients with chronic pain. His last study was an NIH-funded trial evaluating vaporized cannabis in patients with sickle cell disease. He co-authored the chapter on “Cannabinoids and Cancer” in the Oxford University Press Integrative Oncology text that he co-edited with Andrew Weil. He co-edits the NCI PDQ CAM Cannabinoids and Cancer website. He was a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine’s committee that published The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research in January 2017.



Speaker
The Year in Review
"Early breast cancer"

Foluso Olabisi Ademuyiwa, MD, MPH, MSCI
Associate Professor
Washington University 

Foluso Olabisi Ademuyiwa is a Breast Medical Oncologist and Associate Professor at Washington University. She earned a medical degree from the University of Ibadan in Nigeria, completed residency in Internal Medicine/Pediatrics at Bridgeport Hospital-Yale New Haven Health, and fellowship in Hematology/Oncology at Indiana University, and is board certified in Medical Oncology. She serves as Principal Investigator for several investigator-initiated and cooperative group studies, and has authored more than 55 peer-reviewed articles. 

Her research is focused on racial disparities in breast cancer, and in designing and conducting innovative clinical trials in triple negative breast cancer. Dr. Ademuyiwa is the Diversity & Inclusion Leader of the Hematology/Oncology Fellowship program at WUSM, and is also on the Breast Cancer Research Program Leadership Steering Committee at WUSM. She has served on multiple grant review panels, including the AACR Breast Cancer Research Grants Scientific Review Committee and the Swiss Cancer League, and as an ad hoc manuscript reviewer for multiple journals over the years. In recognition of her clinical work, she has consistently been named as a “Best Doctor” in St. Louis for 2015 – 2021, and has been named as one of the 27 Top Breast Cancer Oncologists by Forbes in 2017.



Moderator
Special Session
"Regulatory Insights to the 2021 Early Stage Breast Cancer Approval"

Laleh Amiri Kordestani, MD
Clinical Team Member
Food and Drug Administration



Moderator
Translational Science Forum
"ER Mutations and SERDS"

Panel Member
Molecular Tumor Board

Fabrice André, MD, PhD
Professor in Oncology
Gustave Roussy

Fabrice André, MD, PhD, received his MD in Grenoble in 2002, and a PhD in Biotechnology from Paris University in 2005.He is a past recipient of Young Investigator and Career Development awards from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and is currently Head of Research and Professor in the Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.

His research work in the field of biomarkers and personalised therapies focuses on biomarker discovery, development of targeted agents and implementation of personalised medicine. His team includes 70 people working on basic sciences, bioinformatics, biotechnologies and clinical research. He is also leading phase I-III trials testing targeted agents in the field of breast cancer and large national trials testing implementation of high throughput technologies in the health care system.Professor André has published more than 200 peer reviewed papers, including papers in the New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Nature Medicine, Science, Lancet Oncology and Journal of Clinical Oncology, either as main or co-author.

Professor André is chairman of the biomarker group at UNICANCER (French cooperative group) and was a member of several scientific committees for international meetings, including SABCS, AACR, ECCO, ESMO, and IMPAKT.Professor André has been a member of the Annals of Oncology Editorial Board (2010-2013), Associate Editor since 2014 and in September 2017 became Editor-in-Chief.

He has been a member of the ESMO Educational Committee since 2009, he was coordinator (2012-2014) and member (since 2015) of the ESMO Breast Cancer Faculty. Professor André was also a member of the ESMO Cancer Research Faculty, 2012-2014; and is currently chair of the ESMO Translational Research and Precision Medicine Working Group.



Moderator
The Year in Review

Carlos L. Arteaga, MD
Professor and Director
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center

Dr. Arteaga obtained his MD degree at the University of Guayaquil in Ecuador. He trained in Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology at Emory University and the University of Texas Health Sciences Center San Antonio, respectively. He joined Vanderbilt in 1989 where he served as Associate Director for Translational/Clinical Research, Director of the Center for Cancer Targeted Therapies and the Breast Cancer Program of the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC). He has over 300 publications in the areas of signaling by growth factor receptors and oncogenes in breast tumor cells, development of targeted therapies and biomarkers of drug action and resistance, and investigator-initiated clinical trials in breast cancer. Since 2002, he directed the NCI-funded Vanderbilt Breast Cancer SPORE where he co-led several investigator-initiated clinical trials. His research is or has been funded by the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society, the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, Stand Up 2 Cancer (SU2C), the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation, and the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. He is member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation (1998) and the Association of American Physicians (2005). He served in the NCI Board of Scientific Counselors (1999-2004), NCI Parent Subcommittee A for review of Cancer Centers (2004-2008), the Breast Core Committee of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) and the Board of Directors of the American Association for Cancer Research (2004-2007). Arteaga is the recipient of the 2003 AACR Richard & Hinda Rosenthal Award, a 2007-2017 ACS Clinical Research Professor Award, the 2009 Gianni Bonadonna Award from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the 2011 Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction from the Komen Foundation, and the 2015 Prize for Scientific Excellence in Medicine from the American-Italian Cancer Foundation. He was elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2013 and Fellow of the AACR Academy in 2015, and serves in the Scientific Advisory Board of the Komen Foundation. He chaired the AACR Special Conference ‘Advances in Breast Cancer Research’ (2003-11) and has served as AACR co-chair of the annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium since 2009. He was Deputy Editor of Clinical Cancer Research (2005-2013) and is member of the Editorial Board of Cancer Cell, Cancer Discovery and six other peer-reviewed journals. He serves in the advisory boards of several academic Breast Cancer Programs and NCI-designated Cancer Centers. He served as the 2014-2015 President of the American Association for Cancer Research, the largest cancer research organization in the world. In 2017, he was appointed as Director of the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center and Associate Dean of Oncology Programs at UT Southwestern Medical Center.



Moderator
Educational Session
"Fine Tuning Risk Assessment and Risk Reduction"

Banu Arun, MD, FASCO
Director, Clinical Genetics
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr.Banu Arun is Professor in Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Co-Medical Director of the Clinical Cancer Genetics Program and Section Chief Breast Genetics, Prevention and Screening at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Her research focuses on identifying risk biomarkers for breast cancer and prevention, and characterizing risk factors in a cohort of high-risk women with hereditary gene mutations (BRCA and others) as well as assessing breast cancer biology in these patients. She has served as the Principal Investigator on several clinical trials evaluating agents such as letrozole, imatinib, gemcitabine, R115777 and PARP inhibitors for metastatic breast cancer (including BRCA positive,) and celecoxib, atorvastatin and dasatinib in short-term breast cancer prevention trials. Her research also include outreach and education. As well as cascade genetic testing of family members. 

Given her national and international expertise she has served in several committees, including The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Prevention committee and currently serves as the Co-Chair for the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) Prevention and Epidemiology Committee and member of the NCCN Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Guideline Committee, member of the ASCO BOLD task force, member of ASCO Prevention Education committee, and member of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Prevention Steering Committee. She served as grant reviewer for Susan Komen and NCI P01 and reviewed for journals including JCO, Cancer, BMJ, Cancer Prevention and Epidemiology, amongst others. She has more than 200 peer reviewed publications and received research grants from the NCI, Susan Komen Foundation and CPRIT. 

She was also featured in Forbes (December 2017) as one of the top 30 Breast Medical Oncologists in the United States. She has also received FASCO award recognition in 2020 from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.



Moderator
Educational Session
"Local Therapy of the Primary and Beyond in Patients with Advanced Disease"

Rajendra Achyut Badwe, MS
Director
Tata Memorial Center, Mumbai

Dr. Rajendra Badwe, currently, Director, Tata Memorial Centre, has more than 30 years of diverse experience as a Surgeon and Oncologist, and as Director, has lead Tata Memorial Centre, a world renowned institution in the field of cancer care. He is an international opinion leader in oncology, developing breast cancer care strategies, innovative research, integrating delivery systems, improving quality and cancer management programs and capacity building of staff on cancer care delivery strategy and practice issues. His significant accomplishments in leadership in cancer care are a testimony to his role as a mentor in developing the cancer care strategy for Government of India and WHO. His pioneering work on ‘Timing of Surgery for Breast Cancer’ has induced a paradigm shift towards importance of events at the time of surgery. He is a frequent traveler and speaker in no. of national and international meetings and has more than 167 publications to his credit. He is recipient of prestigious national awards, honours and gold medals. 

Dr Badwe is nationally & internationally renowned & has won several awards in recognition of his stellar contributions to cancer care. He was conferred the Padma Shri by the President of India and the Lal Bahadur Shastri National Award for Excellence in Public Administration, Academics & Management, both in 2013. His international recognition includes prestigious awards from the National Cancer Institute, US & the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) amongst others. Under his stewardship, the TMC had the honour of plenary session presentations at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in two out of three years in the last decade, a feat that very few cancer centres in the world have achieved



Speaker
Workshop
"Selecting rational biomarkers for clinical and translational studies"

Moderator
Educational Session
"Anti-cancer Immune Response"

Justin M. Balko, PharmD, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Vanderbilt University Medical Center 

Justin M. Balko obtained his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 2004.  After completion of his PhD in the Clinical and Experimental Therapeutics track of the Pharmaceutical Sciences program at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, KY, he joined the laboratory of Carlos L. Arteaga, MD, in 2009 as a postdoctoral research fellow.

Dr. Balko was appointed as Assistant Professor of Medicine in January of 2015 and promoted to Associate Professor of Medicine and Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology in February of 2020.  He has published approximately 90 papers in the field of molecular oncology and translational oncology research, primarily in the breast cancer field.  His laboratory focuses on identifying biomarkers and mechanisms of drug sensitivity or resistance in breast cancer and other tumor types, ways to enhance response rates to immunotherapy by targeting cancer-specific signals of immune suppression, and the biological mechanisms of immune-related adverse events to immunotherapies. His laboratory receives funding from the NIH/NCI, the Department of Defense, The IBC Network Foundation, the Jimmy V Foundation for Cancer Research, The Mary Kay Foundation, Stand Up 2 Cancer/AACR, and Susan G. Komen.  He is currently a correlative sciences Principal Investigator on several breast cancer trials employing combinations of molecularly-targeted agents with immunotherapy. 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Acupuncture"

Ting Bao, MD
Director, Integrative Breast Oncology
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Ting Bao is a breast medical oncologist who takes an integrative medicine approach to cancer care. She incorporates complementary therapies into cancer treatment to promote patient’s physical strength and mental resilience, helping them to maintain the best quality of life possible and to support their treatment goals. Such therapies include diet and lifestyle changes, mind-body therapies, physical exercise, acupuncture, and massage therapy. She also counsels patients on dietary supplements so that they can avoid risks associated with their improper use. As a board-certified acupuncturist, she uses acupuncture to reduce cancer treatment-induced side effects.

Dr. Bao works with patients who have been diagnosed with any type of cancer, and has a special focus on patients with breast cancer. Her goal is to develop and deliver state-of-the-art evidence-based integrative oncology care to enhance and potentially extend survival for cancer patients.

Her research interests include the efficacy and mechanisms of complementary therapies in oncology practice. As principal investigator and author of a number of clinical trials, she examines the effectiveness of acupuncture and explores the mechanisms by which it may improve quality of life for cancer patients. She also writes review and opinion articles, review manuscripts for professional journals, and is a member of the NCI Physician Data Query Complementary and Alternative Medicine Editorial Board.



Moderator
Workshop
"Clinical Research: From Study Design to Scientific Presentation"

Panel Member
Molecular Tumor Board

Aditya Bardia, MD, MPH
Attending Physician
Massachusetts General Hospital

Dr. Aditya Bardia, a board-certified medical oncologist, is an Attending Physician at Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston. As the Director of Breast Cancer Research, Dr. Bardia is interested in advancing clinical and translational research to significantly improve the outcomes of patients with breast cancer. Dr. Bardia has led the clinical development of antibody drug conjugate (ADC), sacituzumab govitecan, and selective estrogen receptor degrader (SERD), elacestrant, in metastatic breast cancer. Dr. Bardia has received several research awards including outstanding award for research excellence at Mayo Clinic, Young Investigator Award from ASCO, and Douglas Family Foundation prize for excellence in oncology research at MGH.



Panel Member
View From The Trenches-What Will You Do On Monday Morning?

Carlos H. Barrios, MD
Director
Latin American Cooperative Oncology Group (LACOG)

Carlos H. Barrios M.D. works at the investigation center of the Hospital São Lucas, Brazil. Dr. Barrios graduated at PUCRS Medical School in Porto Alegre in 1979. He completed his Internal Medicine training at Hospital de Clínicas, URFGS, in Porto Alegre and Jackson Memorial Hospital, University of Miami from 1980 through 1985. He had his Hematology and Oncology training at the Washington University, Barnes and Jewish Hospitals in St Louis, US. 

He is Adjunct Assistant Professor of the William Harrington Latin American Program of the University of Miami School of Medicine since 1991. He is Director of the Oncology Research Center at Hospital São Lucas, PUCRS since 1996, where he has participated in over 250 clinical research trials over the last 20 years. 

He has a strong interest in the development of international research collaboration and implementation of cooperative research infrastructures in Latin America. As such, he is cofounder and current Director of LACOG (Latin American Cooperative Oncology Group) that congregates more than 70 investigators from 14 different countries in Latin America. 

His clinical work is concentrated in the areas of Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer and Kidney Cancer. Has numerous abstract presentations in international congresses and scientific peer reviewed publications



Speaker

Educational Session
"Everything you always wanted to know about AI but were afraid to ask"

Regina Barzilay, PhD
Professor
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Prof. Regina Barzilay conducts research in the intersection of oncology and AI.  Her expertise ranges from image-based models for risk assessment and early detection of breast cancer to machine learning based drug design. She actively publishes in these areas, and presents her work to both clinical and machine learning communities. She is a MacArthur Fellow, and recently won $1M AI Squirrel Award for Artificial Intelligence for the benefit of Humanity.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 15 
"Defining Molecular Markers of Endocrine Resistance in Clinic"

Reva Basho, MD
Assistant Professor
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Reva Basho, MD is a medical oncologist and clinical investigator with a focus in breast cancer. Her research focuses on the development of novel therapies for the treatment of breast cancer, with an emphasis on evaluating targeted anticancer agents. She is the Co-Director of the Women's Cancer Research Program at Cedars-Sinai. Dr. Basho earned her medical degree from Baylor College of Medicine and completed her residency at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine. She completed her hematology and oncology fellowship at MD Anderson Cancer Center.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 5 
"Life After Breast Cancer: Cardiac Health, Fertility Preservation, and Returning to Life"

Carmen Bergom, MD
Associate Professor
Washington University School of Medicine

Carmen Bergom, M.D., Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in Radiation Oncology at Washington University in St. Louis.  She treats breast cancer patients one day per week, and she also leads an R01-funded translational research laboratory focusing on using innovative genetic models to improve the therapeutic ratio radiation therapy by identifying targets to enhance tumor radiosensitivity and minimize cardiac radiation toxicity. Dr. Bergom obtained undergraduate degrees in Chemical Engineering and Biology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a Master’s degree in Epidemiology at Cambridge University, and M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW).  She completed her medical residency in Radiation Oncology at MCW. During her residency, she was named a Leonard B. Holman Research Pathway Fellow by the American Board of Radiology. She was a faculty member at MCW until 2020, when she moved her research program to Washington University. Throughout her training and career, Dr. Bergom has been interested in coupling basic research findings with translational and clinical research. 



Speaker

Educational Session
"Monitoring of advanced breast cancer with liquid biopsies"

François-Clément Bidard, MD PhD
Professor of Medical Oncology
Institut Curie
Paris Saclay University

Dr. Bidard is Coordinator of Breast Cancer Research and Head of the Circulating Tumor Biomarkers laboratory at Institut Curie Hospitals (Paris & Saint Cloud, France). He trained as a physician-scientist at the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris, France, received his PhD in Biology from the Paris Sud University (2008) and his medical degree from the Pierre and Marie Curie University (2009). Dr. Bidard also completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Breast Cancer Genetics and Pathology in the Reis-Filho’s lab at Memorial Sloan Kettering, NY (2013). He was appointed Full Professor of Medical Oncology at UVSQ/Paris-Saclay University in 2017. 

His research interests include developmental therapeutic approaches for breast cancer and clinical applications of circulating biomarkers. Dr. Bidard is a research physician and clinical investigator with expertise in designing clinical trials with new agents and innovative treatment strategies.



Discussant
General Session 2

Anne Blaes, MD
Associate Professor 
University of Minnesota

Anne Blaes is an Associate Professor in the Division of Hematology/Oncology at the University of Minnesota and the Director of Cancer Survivorship Services and Translational Research within the Masonic Cancer Center. She is an active hematologist/medical oncologist with a special interest in breast cancer and cancer survivorship.  She is the immediate past chair of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Cancer Survivorship Committee.



Co-Moderator

Special Session
"Health Equity in Translational Research Studies"

Melissa L. Bondy, PhD
Chair and Professor
Stanford Medicine

Dr. Melissa Bondy is Chair and Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health at Stanford University School of Medicine and Associate Director for Population Sciences at the Stanford Cancer Institute.   She was a Komen Scholar (Susan G. Komen Foundation) from 2011-2017 and a McNair Medical Institute Scholar.  She is an established cancer epidemiologist with a multi-disciplinary focus on translational research. Her research focus integrates the field of epidemiology with the lab and clinic. She is at the forefront of developing innovative ways to assess the roles of heredity and genetic susceptibility in the etiology of cancer, primarily brain and breast cancer. She has served on many cancer center advisory committees and she is a member of the NCI Board of Scientific Advisors.  



Speaker

Translational Science Forum
"Basic"

Kim RM Blenman, PhD, MS
Assistant Professor
Yale University

Kim RM Blenman, PhD, MS is an immunologist and clinical chemist who uses and develops novel software tools to understand the mechanisms responsible for disparities in disease pathogenesis and therapeutic response. She earned a doctorate in immunology, a master's in clinical chemistry, and a bachelor's in chemistry from the University of Florida. Her research at that time focused on the autoimmune disease Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.Dr Blenman also has a certificate in Drug Development and Regulatory Sciences from the University of California San Francisco. She had the privilege of learning and working on drug discovery and clinical development at Procter & Gamble's Pharmaceutical division as a senior scientist and as a global research director for autoimmune diseases Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Irritable Bowel Syndrome.As a Clinical Scientist, her interest in cancer research, therapeutic development, and health disparities prompted her to re-enter academia and leverage her learnings from the pharmaceutical industry. She re-entered academia as a traditional Postdoctoral Fellow at the City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center in California. During her fellowship, she uncovered a potential use for B cells in predicting disease-free survival in breast cancer patients. In collaboration with Cambridge Research Institute/Perkin Elmer (now Akoya Bioscience), Dr Blenman also helped to develop the Vectra Quantitative Multispectral Imaging System for immunology applications.Dr Blenman is currently an Assistant Professor in the Yale School of Medicine Department of Internal Medicine Section of Medical Oncology and the Yale Cancer Center. Dr Blenman is also and Assistant Professor in the Yale School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Department of Computer Science. She has publications in melanoma suggesting that along with other immune cells, B cell and neutrophils may have a role in tumor regression and immunotherapy response (anti-PD-1, anti-CTLA-4, and/or combination) in murine models and in patients. She also has publications in methods, software tool workflow, and data standards for flow cytometry and high complexity histology. She is currently working on several breast cancer clinical studies interrogating the immune components of the tumor microenvironment of patients treated with chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy and patients of different ancestries. For these studies, Dr Blenman is interested in understanding and identifying specific immune mechanisms that are responsible for disparities in therapeutic efficacy and toxicity between ancestry groups.Additionally, Dr Blenman is also an active academic citizen. She mentors Postdocs and undergraduates internally and external to Yale. She helps to find ways to support equity and diversity for Yale Faculty as member of the Steering and Council for the Yale University Women Faculty Forum, as an Executive Board Member of the Yale School of Medicine Committee on the Status of Women in Medicine, and as a member of the Executive Committee of the Yale School of Medicine Minority Organization for Recruitment and Expansion.



Discussant

Spotlight Session 7
"Locoregional Treatment: De-Escalation in Breast Cancer"

Julie Bradley, MD
Associate Professor
University of Florida

Dr. Bradley is a tenured Associate Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Florida, specializing in treating children with benign or malignant tumors and women and men with breast cancer and. Prior to joining the UF Health Proton Therapy Institute, she completed her undergraduate studies in engineering at Dartmouth College, medical school at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine and residency training in Radiation Oncology at the Medical College of Wisconsin. She currently holds the James E Lockwood Professorship for proton therapy.Her clinical research focuses on reduction of therapy-related side effects. She is an invited speaker and moderator at national and international conferences and her work is published in multiple medical journals and textbooks. She has received several awards for her research, including “Best of ASTRO 2009,” the Particle Therapy Cooperative Group-North America “Inaugural Meeting Award for Best Abstract” in 2014, and the American Radium Society Poster Presentation Award in 2014.She has served as an Associate Editor for the breast cancer section of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics, as well as an editor for The Breast Journal. She is involved in protocol development through Children’s Oncology Group. She has been recognized for her teaching, receiving both the University of Florida College of Medicine Exemplary Teacher Award and the ARRO Educator of the Year award in 2017. She previously served as the American College of Radiology board member for the Medical Dosimetry Certification Board.  


Panel Member
View From The Trenches-What Will You Do On Monday Morning?

Thomas Braun, PhD
Professor of Biostatistics
University of Michigan

During Dr. Thomas Braun's career at the University of Michigan, he has established himself as an international expert in the Bayesian adaptive Phase I clinical trials in oncology. He has developed methods for numerous aspects of Phase I trial design, including dose-finding based upon toxicity for both single agents and combinations of two agents, optimal scheduling of dose administrations, incorporation of efficacy outcomes into dose-finding, and most recently, developing simulation-free methods to assess operating characteristics of the Continual Reassessment Method (CRM). 

His collaborative research areas have been heavily focused in oncology, and for over 20 years, he has been the primary statistician for the Blood and Marrow Transplant Program at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center. Their work continues to explore new drugs for the treatment and prevention of acute-graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), and they also are now exploring the use of tablets and wearable devices to continuously monitor the health and behavior of transplant recipients and their primary caregivers. Over the years, Dr. Braun also supported research in adults with breast cancer, lung cancer, and oral cancer. Most recently, he is collaborating in research in which they plan to connect their own survey of oncologists’ knowledge of immunotherapeutic agents to a large database of medical health records to determine if disparities exist in how oncologists prescribe immunotherapeutic agents, and if treatment options differ by demographics such as age, sex, race, ethnicity, and socio-economic status. 

Dr. Braun is also a current Co-Director of the AACR/ASCO Methods in Clincial Cancer Research Workshop and has served as a faculty member for several years prior to his current leadership role.



Speaker
Special Session
"Working with patient advocates to promote diversity in trial participation and biospecimen donation"

Vernal Branch
Patient Research Advocate
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Lineberger Breast SPORE

Vernal Branch is a 27 year breast cancer survivor, who immediately got involved with several cancer organizations, especially the National Breast Cancer Coalition, where she took a scientificate courses (Project LEAD). These courses included epidemiology, biology, immunology, clinical trials and quality care. She is now a mentor for this course to help train others.

She has been a grant reviewer for the Dept. of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program ( reviewer & a-hoc on programmatic review), California Breast Cancer Research Program as a reviewer and chair, Susan G. Komen Research Program as a reviewer, and ASCO Foundation as a reviewer and served for seven years on the NCI Director's Consumer Liaison Group. She is currently serving on the Alliance for clinical trials and also a member of a Data Safety Monitoring committee at NCI.

Vernal Branch has been a speaker on panels for SABCS on their clinical presentations, and submitted a poster in 2010. Spoken before on the Affordable Care Act at the White House and before a Congressional committee.

Before retiring she was the research and legislative director for a non-profit organization at the Virginia Breast Cancer Foundation. While in Virginia, Ms. Branch served on the IRB at Virginia Commonwealth University, and their NCORP grant for clinical trials.

She is presently serving on the SPORE at UNC Chapel Hill, where they have recently started a new initiative for patient involvment in tissue collection as partners in research efforts.



Chair
Spotlight Session 4
"Brain Metastases: Managing LMD / Targeting HER2"

Andrew Brenner, MD, PhD
Professor
UT Health San Antonio

Dr. Andrew Brenner has worked in experimental therapeutics with a focus on treatment of neuro-oncological disease for 12 years. His early work focused on alternate means of targeting the vasculature in glioblastoma that was not dependent on angiogenic signals directly. This led to a collaboration with Vascular Biogenics in which his laboratory established the activity of the anti-endothelial gene therapy, VB111, in preclinical models of GBM (for which he holds a patent but no financial stake). He was then principal investigator of the first in human study for advanced malignancies with this novel biologic which determined the recommended phase 2 dose, as well as a subsequent dual phase I/II study in recurrent GBM that showed a marked improvement in survival compared to historical controls. He served on the steering committee for the pivotal GLOBE trial, as well as led trial accrual across international sites. While the GLOBE study was negative, subsequent findings suggest bevacizumab (bev) interferes with VB-111 transgene expression, and a neo-adjuvant study is ongoing to address this. His work then shifted to overcoming resistance to antiangiogenics given the marked endothelial dependence of GBM, and lack of survival benefit from bevacizumab. Given the role of hypoxia in antiangiogenic resistance, they also began working with hypoxia activated prodrug evofosfamide (Evo) for bev refractory GBM. His team was able to establish a phase 2 dose with bevacizumab as both safe and promising based with early signals of efficacy. This led to their recently completed multicenter phase 2 trial of Evo with Bev at Bev progression, including characterization of hypoxia with 18F-MISO PET and metabolomics. They demonstrated a PFS-4 on Evo-Bev of 31%, a statistically significant improvement over the historical rate of 3%. They also found baseline hypoxic volume to correlate with PFS (HV; HR=1.67, P=0.009) and OS (HR=1.711, p=0.01), with subgroup analysis trending toward a decrease in HV (baseline to day 28) correlating with longer OS and PFS. At the preclinical level, he has been involved in the development of a number of new therapeutics. They developed a novel form of radiation therapy utilizing a unique chelator (BMEDA) to load nanoliposomes with beta emitting theragnostic 186Rhenium. The final investigational product, RNL186, is currently in a multicenter phase 1 study for which I am PI, with plans to progress to phase 2 in the coming months. He led not only the preclinical evaluation, but the entire IND enabling process including authoring toxicology studies, collaborating with the Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory at the NCI for CMC evaluation, as well as authoring the clinical documents. His experimental therapeutics work also extends to collaborations with a number of laboratories including those with Dr. Vadlamudi in which they recently have shown GBM cells uniquely express estrogen receptor beta (ERβ)20, using KO models demonstrated that ERβ exhibited tumor suppression function in GBM, that ERβ alters the chemo-sensitivity of cancer cells, and ERβ agonists increased the sensitivity of GBM cells to chemotherapeutic agents such as TMZ and lomustine. They have recently identified several selective ERβ agonists for therapeutic use with high CNS penetration. 

He is currently a Study Chair of two cooperative group studies (S1906 and S2007), and has  been coleader for several years of our Experimental and Developmental Therapeutics Program of their recently renewed P30, and he has participated on numerous clinical advisory boards for putative neuro-oncologic drugs.



Co-Moderator
General Session 3

Powel Brown, MD, PhD
Professor and Chair Clinical Cancer Prevention
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Powel Brown is a  Professor and Chairman of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center's Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention. He also holds a joint appointment in the Department of Breast Medical Oncology. For more than 30 years, he has provided cancer treatment and cancer preventive care to patients.  In their clinical research program, they are testing novel drugs and strategies to prevent cancer. In his clinical practice, he treats women with breast cancer and manage breast cancer survivors and women at high risk of breast cancer.  He also conducts clinical, translational, and laboratory-based breast cancer research to identify ways to prevent breast cancer, especially the most aggressive form of this disease, "triple-negative breast cancer". In his laboratory, they use genomics and proteomics to discover critical "drivers" of breast cancer development. They then target these molecular drivers in animals and women to treat and even prevent breast cancer. Through these efforts, they will develop safe and effective strategies to eliminate breast cancer.



Panel Member
Clinical Case Discussion

Thelma Perry Brown, BSc
Patient/Research Advocate
University of Alabama at Birmingham

In 2008, Thelma was diagnosed with breast cancer and in 2014, she was diagnosed with a recurrence. Additionally, her mother and five of her sisters also had breast cancer. Thelma is deeply committed to supporting research that will lead to better understanding of this disease, as well as more effective and less toxic treatments. Thelma’s analytical skills, which were honed by her formal education in engineering, her keen interest in the sciences, as well as her perspective of that of a survivor and co- survivor, is a unique, but perfect fit for patient and research advocacy. 

Thelma has been involved in patient and research advocacy over 14 years. As a member of the Breast Cancer Working Group at Birmingham (UAB) Comprehensive Cancer Center, she has worked closely with basic science, clinical, and translational researchers. Thelma is a patient advocate with the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC), acting as Lead Advocate for the Endocrine Resistance Working Group, the I-SPY2 trial as a member of the Safety Working Group, Komen Advocates in Science, the Metastatic Breast Cancer Alliance and the ASCO CancerLinQ Patient Advisory Committee. She has previously served as a panelist at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Research Consortium (SABCS), presented and collaborated on posters at SABCS and American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting.

In addition to patient/ research advocacy, Thelma has served on the Board of the Directors of North Central Alabama-Susan G. Komen, the Advocates in Science Committee, and as the Education Chair for the affiliate. She also a member of the Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalition, and the Community Advisory Board for the Gulf States Young Breast Cancer Survivor Network. 



Panel Member
Special Session
"Trust in Science and Healthcare

Darcy Burbage, DNP, RN, AOCN, CBCN
Oncology Nursing Consultant
Newark, DE

Darcy Burbage, DNP, RN, AOCN, CBCN is a recognized leader in Oncology Nursing having served on the Boards of several professional and patient advocacy organizations including the American Cancer Society, Cancer Support Community, Project LIFE Metastatic Breast Cancer Community, the Delaware Breast Cancer Coalition and currently, serves as Secretary of the National Oncology Nursing Society Board of Directors.

Having begun her career as an LPN, she continued her education to become an RN completing her ADN, then her BSN followed by an MSN in Oncology Nursing where she was awarded the outstanding thesis award from the University of Delaware for her research on self-transcendence and quality of life in breast cancer survivors. She received her DNP from Duke University School of Nursing where her doctoral study focused on implementing a survivorship program for individuals living with recurrent breast cancer. She is dual certified as an Advanced Oncology Certified Nurse (AOCN) and Certified Breast Care Nurse (CBCN) through the Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation.

In addition to her clinical experience, Dr Burbage has authored articles, books chapters, online courses as well as presented locally, nationally and internationally on multiple oncology topics and is a past recipient of the prestigious Oncology Nursing Society Pearl Moore Making a Difference Award as well as the Susan G Komen Breast Cancer Foundation Hometown Hero Award. Her research interests include symptom management, palliative care and individuals living with metastatic breast cancer. Darcy is passionate about helping patients maximize their quality of life and in helping to remove complex processes and implementing more efficient ones that improve patient care and reduces the tasks of clinicians.



Panel Member

Molecular Tumor Board

Mark E. Burkard, MD, PhD
Professor
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Mark Burkard is a researcher and medical oncologist who studies genomic instability in breast cancer. He completed MD and PhD training at the University of Rochester MSTP. After internal medicine training at New York Hospital/Weill Cornell, he proceeded to Medical Oncology Fellowship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. He joined the University of Wisconsin and the UW Carbone Cancer Center (UWCCC) in 2008. He leads a research laboratory focused on mechanisms of kinetochore function and genomic instability. He serves as Associate Director for Genomics and Precision Medicine in the UWCCC and in this role coordinates the state-wide Precision Molecular Tumor Board (PMMTB). The PMMTB has reviewed genomic findings and made recommendations for genomic-directed treatments for over 5,000 patients with advanced cancer. He also co-leads the Basket clinical trials research group which coordinates genomic-directed clinical trials in the cancer center. He serves as a member of the ASCO TAPUR Molecular Tumor Board.



Chair

Debate
"RxPONDER: Was it all OFS?"

Harold J. Burstein, MD, PhD
Professor
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Harvard Medical School

Dr Burstein is a medical oncologist specializing in breast cancer. He trained at Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, where he now is an Institute Physician and Professor of Medicine.



Panel Member
Special Session
"Trust in Science and Healthcare"

Daniel J. Calac, MD
Chief Medical Officer
Indian Health Council, Inc.

Since 2003 Dr. Calac has served as CMO of Indian Health Council, Inc. (IHC), a consortium of nine tribes located in North County San Diego. IHC provides on-site and outreach services and programs to nearly 5,000 clients and provides over 20,000 visits per year. He received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School and did both internship and residency in internal medicine and pediatrics at the Combined Internal Medicine/Pediatrics Residency Program at University of Southern California/Los Angeles County (USC-LAC). Calac also serves his community by contracting part-time with The Elizabeth Hospice, providing hospice care and emotional support to both the terminally ill and their family members.  He serves on the Advisory Board of Directors for California State University San Marcos and as a Governance Board Member for a local All Tribes Charter School located on the Rincon Indian Reservation.He served as a co-principal investigator for the Preventing Underage Drinking by Southwest Indians Program sponsored by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). Currently, he is a Principal Investigator with the California Native American Research Centers for Health (NARCH) whose goals are to increase the quantity and quality of research on the health of Native Americans in California and to increase the number of Native American students and faculty in California universities. He has served as the Principal Investigator for this project for the past 5 years and is committed to the fundamental mission of the project.  He plays an active role in projects, in some as Dual-PI, and his commitment is further enhanced by providing shadowing/mentoring session for those students involved in the NARCH program and its individual projects.



Speaker
Susan G. Komen Brinker® Award for Scientific Distinction in Basic Science

Carlos Caldas, MD, FMedSci
Professor of Cancer Medicine
Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute

Carlos Caldas is Professor of Cancer Medicine (since 2002), University of Cambridge, and Head, Breast Cancer Functional Genomics Laboratory, Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute (since 2007). He graduated from the University of Lisbon Medical School, completed a Residency in Internal Medicine at UT Southwestern in 1991 and a Fellowship in Medical Oncology at Johns Hopkins in 1994. He then moved to the UK and completed a Research Fellowship at the ICR in London in 1996. In 1996 he was recruited to Cambridge as junior faculty.He is an Honorary Consultant Medical Oncologist (since 1996) and was the founding Breast Cancer Programme Director at the Cambridge Cancer Centre (2017-2020). In 2016-17 he did a Professorial Sabbatical at the Weizmann Institute of Science, where he is since a Visiting Professor.He is Fellow of the Academy of the Medical Sciences, Fellow of the European Academy of Cancer Sciences, and EMBO Member. He holds an ERC Advanced Grant (2016-2021).He received the 2016 ESMO Hamilton Fairley Award and the 2021 European Society of Human Genetics Award. He has published over 400 manuscripts, including in Nature, Cell, Cell Reports, New England Journal of Medicine, Nature Genetics, Nature Medicine, Nature Cancer, Science Translational Medicine and Nature Communications. He is in the 2018, 2019 and 2020 list of Highly Cited Researchers, Web of Science

His research focus is the functional genomics of breast cancer and its biological and clinical implications. His laboratory redefined the molecular taxonomy of breast cancer, revealing novel subtypes and their respective drivers [Curtis et al, Nature 2012; Dawson et al, EMBO J 2013; Pereira et al, Nature Communications 2016], robustly validated this new breast cancer molecular taxonomy [Ali et al, Genome Biology 2014], and showed recently that it determines the clinical trajectories of patients, including late relapses [Rueda et al, Nature 2019]. His group also completed miRNA profiling [Dvinge et al, Nature 2013] and characterized the DNA methylation landscapes of the same tumors [Batra et al, Nature Communications, 2021], providing novel insights into the epigenetics of a common epithelial malignancy. He has pioneered the characterization of breast cancers as distinct ecosystems [Ali et al, Nature Cancer 2020]. He co-led seminal studies that define the clonal heterogeneity of triple negative breast cancers [Shah et al, Nature 2012] and the patterns of whole-genome ER binding in primary breast tumors [Ross-Ines, Nature 2012]. His group also led the translational studies that established ctDNA as a monitoring biomarker in breast cancer [Dawson et al, NEJM 2013] and as a liquid biopsy to unravel therapy resistance [Murtaza et al, Nature 2013; Murtaza el al, Nature Communications 2015]. More recently his laboratory has pioneered and developed the use of patient-derived tumor explants as a model system for breast cancer and a pre-clinical pharmacogenomics platform that mimics the genomic and phenotypic heterogeneity of the human tumors [Bruna et al, Cell 2016; Georgopolou et al, Nature Communications, 2021]. 

He created the Personalized Breast Cancer Programme, which uniquely offers whole genome and transcriptome sequencing to all consenting patients with both early and advanced disease in Cambridge. He has also fostered a multi-disciplinary program that integrates multi-omics, pathology and radiology to deliver systems medicine for breast cancer patients. 



Speaker
Plenary Lecture
"Triple Negative Breast Cancer - Pitfalls and Progress"

Lisa A. Carey, MD, ScM, FASCO
Deputy Director for Clinical Science
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center

Lisa A. Carey, MD is the Richardson and Marilyn Jacobs Preyer Distinguished Professor in Breast Cancer Research in the Department of Medicine at the University of North Carolina (UNC). She graduated from Wellesley College, then received her medical degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine where she remained for her residency in Internal Medicine followed by a fellowship in Medical Oncology and an advanced degree in Clinical Investigations. Dr. Carey joined the UNC faculty and Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center in 1998. She was the Chief of the Division of Hematology and Oncology and Physician-in-Chief of the North Carolina Cancer Hospital from 2012-2020. In 2020, Dr. Carey assumed the role of Deputy Director of Clinical Sciences at Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. 

Dr. Carey has a longstanding research interest in the clinical application of laboratory findings in breast cancer, with a particular interest in the clinical implications of different molecular subtypes of breast cancer. She designs and leads clinical trials of novel drugs and approaches, and is a close collaborator with several laboratory investigators and epidemiologists. Dr. Carey has served in many roles for the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the NCI. She is a member of the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars, the recipient of the NCI Director's Service Award, and honored to be a Fellow of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (FASCO). Dr. Carey serves as the co-chair of the Alliance National Cooperative Group Breast Committee since 2016 and is a member of the Komen Scientific Advisory Board.



Patient Advocate
Special Session
"COVID-19 and Cancer"

Isabel Centeno, PhD
Patient Advocate
Hospital Zambrano Hellion



Speaker

Educational Session
"Novel epigenomic targets in TNBC"

David W. Cescon, MD, PhD
Medical Oncologist and Clinician Scientist
Princess Margaret Cancer Centre



Panel Member
Molecular Tumor Board

Sarat Chandarlapaty, MD, PhD
Associate Member
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Sarat Chandarlapaty is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center with appointments as a Laboratory Head in the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program and Associate Member on the Breast Cancer Medicine Service. The goal of Dr. Chandarlapaty’s research is to investigate the mechanisms and consequences of activation of growth factor and hormonal signaling pathways in breast cancer and translate those findings towards the development of more effective and durable treatments for metastatic disease. A major focus of his laboratory has been to characterize the significance of alterations present in breast tumors that have progressed on targeted therapy. Through these efforts he has helped to elucidate both immediate and delayed adaptations in breast cancers that promote treatment resistance. His laboratory has demonstrated how relief of negative feedback on receptor tyrosine kinases promotes adaptive resistance to PI3K pathway directed therapy, identified mutations in the ESR1 gene as a major acquired mechanism of resistance to hormonal therapies, and characterized how CDK6 upregulation can overcome clinically available CDK4/6 kinase inhibitors. Through these and others studies, he has developed an expertise on use of molecular profiling to inform therapeutic decision-making that is the subject of the molecular tumor board activity.



Moderator

Educational Session 
"Triple Positive Breast Cancer"

Jenny C. Chang, MD, MB BChir
Director Cancer Center
Houston Methodist Hospital

Director of the Cancer Center at Houston Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas, and Professor at Weill Cornell Medical School. Dr. Jenny C. Chang obtained her medical degree at Cambridge University in England, and then completed fellowship training in medical oncology at the Royal Marsden Hospital/Institute for Cancer Research in the United Kingdom. She was also awarded a research doctorate from the University of London. Her recent work has focused on the intrinsic therapy resistance of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which has led to several publications and international presentations. In addition, she has been awarded several federal grants to evaluate novel biologic agents, and holds patents on new technologic advances and therapeutic agents.

Dr. Chang has worked in the field of cancer stem cells for more than ten years. After her discovery that CSCs are chemo-resistant, and that targeting the EGFR/HER2 pathway can decrease this subpopulation, she has played a key role in demonstrating some of the limitations and mechanisms of CSCs (Creighton et al., 2009; Li et al., 2008). Her work is now focused on the mechanisms that regulate CSCs, as well as initiating and planning clinical trials that target this critical tumor initiating subpopulation. She is also interested in characterizing the cross-talk between these different pathways that may lead to mechanisms of resistance, and has identified some of the chief regulatory pathways, including inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) and JAK/STAT3 signaling involved in CSC self-renewal (Dave et al., 2014; Dave et al., 2017). Dr. Chang is a world-renown clinical investigator, credited as one of the first to describe intrinsic chemo-resistance of CSCs. She has served on the SABCS planning committee, and has been a speaker and moderator of a mini-symposium.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 8
"HER2 Positive Breast Cancer"

Jo Chien, MD
Associate Professor
University of California San Francisco

Dr. Chien specializes in the management and treatment of patients with breast cancer. She is an Associate Professor of Medicine at UCSF and a medical breast oncologist at the Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Chien received her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and medical degree from Harvard Medical School. She subsequently completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, and her fellowship in Hematology/Oncology at UCSF.

Dr. Chien’s research interests include the translational and clinical development of novel treatment strategies for early stage and metastatic breast cancer. She serves as the Principal Investigator of numerous investigator-initiated as well as industry-sponsored trials. She is the UCSF site PI of the multi-institution I-SPY2 trial, where she co-leads the MammaPrint Low Risk sub-study. Her work has been funded by the NIH, NCI, ASCO, American Cancer Society, and philanthropic support. In addition to her clinical trials work, she is particularly interested in the impact of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment on young women, in particular as it relates to their fertility and family-building.



Moderator
Clinical Science Forum
"The Promise and Reality of Oligometastatic Ablation for Breast Cancer"

Steven J. Chmura, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Radiation and Cellular Oncology
University of Chicago

Steven J. Chmura MD, PhD is the director of Clinical and Translational Research for Radiation Oncology at the University of Chicago for over a decade and now is the Scientific Director of the Cancer Clinical Trials at the University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center. He has been actively involved in both the clinical implementation of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). His main interests and research focus on translational and clinical trial development in the developmental therapeutics space. Dr. Chmura is a leader in the NCI cooperative groups and has led to the first international oligometastatic trials through NRG Oncology examining the safety of treating oligometastatic patients (NRG BR001) as well as the ongoing Phase II/III trial examining potential improvements to progression-free survival and overall survival of SBRT in patients with oligometastatic breast cancer (NRG BR002). Dr. Chmura's work in radio-immunology has also translated into multiple investigator-sponsored and NCI trials examining  the role of SBRT combined with immunotherapy agents; such integration of ablative radiotherapy and immunotherapy along with advancing the search for biomarkers is currently Dr. Chmura's focus. 



Panel Member
Clinical Case Discussion

Boon H. Chua, MB BS, PhD
Director of Cancer and Hematology Services
UNSW Sydney and Prince of Wales Hospital

Dr Boon H. Chua is Professor of Medicine at the University of New South Wales, and Consultant Radiation Oncologist and Director of Cancer and Hematology Services at the Prince of Wales Hospital in Sydney, Australia. With exclusive clinical and academic sub-specialization in breast cancer, she leads an expanding program of competitive grant-funded, academic oncology research in collaboration with cooperative clinical trials groups worldwide. 

Dr Chua is actively involved in the Breast International Group (BIG) as Chief Investigator and Study Chair of BIG 3-07/TROG 07.01 DCIS (randomized phase III study of radiation doses and fractionation schedules fro non-low risk DCIS) and ANZ 1601/BIG 16-02 EXPERT (randomized phase III trial of adjuvant radiotherapy versus observation following breast conserving surgery and endocrine therapy in patients with molecularly characterized low-risk luminal A early breast cancer). She is also international Study Co-Chair of CCTG MA.20 randomized trial of regional nodal irradiation in early breast cancer, and Australian Study Chair of a randomized trial of partial breast irradiation using 3D conformal radiotherapy for early breast cancer and a randomized trial of post-mastectomy radiotherapy for intermediate-risk breast cancer.

Dr Chua holds leadership positions in a diverse range of national and international research and professional organizations including elected member of the BIG Executive Board, Chair of Breast Working Party of Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group, Radiation Oncology Craft Group Lead and Scientific Advisory Committee Executive of Breast Cancer Trials - Australia and New Zealand, and Scientific Committee member of international congresses. She is invited speaker at over 80 international and national scientific meetings, and delivered over 100 presentations at national and international clinical trials group meetings.



Moderator

Educational Session
"SABCS with the Society of Surgical Oncology present Local Therapy - Management of the Axilla" 

Hiram S. Cody III, MD
Professor of Surgery
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Since completing my General Surgery residency at The Roosevelt Hospital, NYC (1974-1979) and Surgical Oncology Fellowship at Memorial Sloan Kettering (1979-1981), I have continuously practiced, taught and conducted clinical research in Breast Surgical Oncology, since 1995 at MSKCC, where I am currently Attending Surgeon, Member Memorial Hospital, and Professor of Surgery. My clinical research since 1981 has focused on the long term outcomes of breast cancer surgery, on sentinel node biopsy, and on the interplay between surgery, RT and systemic therapy, with an ongoing emphasis on surgical de-escalation. I am a Past President of the American Society of Breast Surgeons, active on editorial  boards and in peer review, lecture widely, and am the author of more than 250 publications. 



Presenter - Pro

Debate
"One Week of Whole Breast RT is the New Standard of Care"

Charlotte Elizabeth Coles, PhD, Mb ChB, MRCP & FRCR
Professor of Breast Cancer Clinical Oncology
University of Cambridge

Charlotte Coles is Professor of Breast Cancer Clinical Oncology and Deputy Head of Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge. Her research aims are to provide breast cancer patients with the best chance of cure with least side effects by personalising radiation techniques based on risk of recurrence. She is currently Chief Investigator of 5 clinical trials with linked translational research. Dr. Coles is lead for Cancer Research UK Radnet-Cambridge Radiation Research Centre of Excellence and a National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Research Professor focusing on risk-adapted breast radiation therapy.

She was Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Oncology journal 2015-21 and is the Lead for the Lancet Commission for Breast Cancer. 



Speaker

Basic Science Forum
"GR"

Suzanne Conzen, MD
Division Chief of Hematology & Oncology
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Suzanne D. Conzen, M.D., is a Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine and Chief of the Division of Hematology and Oncology at UT Southwestern Medical Center. She specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer.

Dr. Conzen earned her medical degree at Yale School of Medicine and completed her residency in internal medicine at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. She then received advanced training in hematology and medical oncology through a clinical fellowship at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and in molecular oncology through a research fellowship at Dartmouth Medical School. She also holds a master’s degree from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in medical oncology, she joined the UT Southwestern faculty in 2019 after a 20 year career as a physician-scientist at the University of Chicago.

An established scientist with multiple National Cancer Institute grants and a CPRIT established investigator award, Dr. Conzen focuses her lab’s research on glucocorticoid receptor functioning prostate, breast, and ovarian cancers. Her previous research in Chicago led to the recognition of a role for stress hormone signaling in breast cancer biology and, more recently, in cancer progression and therapy-resistance in prostate and ovarian cancer. Dr. Conzen also receives peer-reviewed funding from the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. She has published countless academic articles, contributed chapters to several books, and delivered scores of presentations. 

Dr. Conzen has been a member of the TBCRG endocrine resistance working group, and she previously served on the CALGB/Alliance breast committee. In addition, she has served as senior editor of Cancer Research and as Chair of the National Institutes of Health’s Cancer Etiology Study Section.

She is also an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the American Association of Physicians.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 11
"The future is Now: Innovation in Pathology and Radiology"

Lee A. Cooper, PhD
Associate Professor
Feinberg School of Medicine

Dr. Cooper received his PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Ohio State University in 2009. He joined the Biomedical Informatics faculty at Emory University in 2012 where he was jointly appointed with Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. He joined the department of pathology at Northwestern in 2019 as an Associate Professor and Director of Computational Pathology.His lab focuses on the applications of machine learning in cancer and fundamental research in machine learning. They develop algorithms to predict clinical outcomes from genomic, imaging, and histopathology data, and to extract quantitative phenotypic information from digital pathology images. Their work has produced a number of software tools that enable researchers to manage large and complex datasets and to interact with these data using machine learning algorithms. Their goal is to improve the quality of predictions used in clinical management and to provide investigators with new tools for basic and clinical science. Their research has been funded by NLM, NCI, NIBIB, NINDS, and industry and foundation sources.



Panel Member

View From The Trenches-What Will You Do On Monday Morning?

Javier Cortés, MD, MPH
Head, International Breast Cancer Center (IBCC)
International Breast Cancer Center, Quiron Group, Barcelona, Spain

Dr. Javier Cortés received a degree in Medicine and Surgery from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid in 1996, specialist in Medical Oncology by the Clínica Universitaria de Navarra, and awarded the title of Doctor in Medical Oncology from the University of Navarra in 2002.  From June 2003 to July 2015, he has worked in the Department of Medical Oncology at the Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, where he has been Coordinator of the Teaching and Training Programme for Residents in Oncology. In addition he was the Head of the Breast Cancer Program from July 2006 to August 2015.  From September 2015 to October 2018, he has been Head of the Breast Cancer and Gynecological tumors at Ramon y Cajal University Hospital in Madrid. Dr. Cortés was the Head of the Breast Cancer Program at IOB Institute of Oncology, Quironsalud group, in both Madrid and Barcelona, from 2011 to September 2020.   

Actually, Dr. Cortés is the Head of the International Breast Cancer Centre (IBCC) in Barcelona, founding partner of Medica Scientia innovation Research (MedSIR), a company involved in the clinical development of clinical trials,  and Senior Clinical Investigator of the Breast Cancer Research Program at Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology.   

In addition to his medical specialties, he has two master degrees in “Medical Direction and Clinical Management” by the Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED) and “Research methodology in Health Sciences” by the Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona and a degree in “Statistics in Health Sciences” by the Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona.   

He is the author of more than 300 publications, especially about breast tumours and new drugs and more than 600 communications at different conferences. He actively participates in the development of numerous international clinical trials, and he is an ad hoc reviewer of various oncology journals, including, New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Lancet Oncology, Annals of Oncology or Journal of Clinical Oncology, among many others   

Dr Cortés is an active member of the Spanish, European, and American Societies of Medical Oncology (SEOM, ESMO, ASCO). In addition, he is a member of the Scientific Committee of the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), Chair of the Committee for Breast Cancer, local therapy, ESMO 2020 and Co-Chair of the American Association for Cancer research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2021 Program Committee.



Speaker

Educational Session
"IO beyond TNBC"

Giuseppe Curigliano, MD PhD
Medical Director
University of Milano and European Institute of Oncology IRCCS

Giuseppe Curigliano, MD PhD, is Associate Professor of Medical Oncology at the University of Milano and the Head of the Division of Early Drug Development at the European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Italy. He gained a PhD degree in clinical Pharmacology in 2008, and completed his training in translational medicine in the Columbia University in New York City. He is currently Co-Chair of Drug Development Program at European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Italy and is a clinical scientist on breast cancer with a focus on targeted therapies and immunotherapy. His main research interests are: early clinical development, phase I trials across solid tumors, pharmacodynamic biomarkers, breast cancer and personalised medicine. He is also involved in translational research aspects related to precision medicine, immunotherapy and tumor progression notably in breast cancer models. He has been a member of the Italian National Health Council since 2018 and, in 2019, he served as Chair of the Scientific Committee of The Lega Nazionale Lotta ai Tumori. He has served as a Member of the ESMO Breast Cancer Faculty since 2001 and he is currently the Faculty Coordinator. He has also served on the Scientific Committee for the St Gallen Conference since 2011, and was the Scientific Co-Chair in St Gallen 2017, 2019 and 2021. He served as the Scientific Chair of the IMPAKT ESMO meeting that was held in Brussels in 2014 and as the Breast Cancer (metastatic) Track Chair of the ESMO 2014 meeting in Madrid. He served as Scientific Co-Chair of the ESMO Breast Cancer Congress in 2019, 2020 and 2021. He has been an Editorial Board Member for Annals of Oncology since 2014, and serves as Co-Editor in Chief of The Breast, Co-Editor in Chief of Cancer Treatment Reviews, Associate Editor of the European Journal of Cancer, Editor of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. He also serves on the European School of Oncology (ESO) faculty committee. He is member of the Italian National Health Council.

Dr. Curigliano serves ESMO as the Chair of the Guidelines Committee and is a Council Member. He is also the Chair of the ESMO Nomination Committee. He was awarded with the first ESO Umberto Veronesi Award in Vienna in 2017 and with the Fellowship of the European Academy of Cancer Sciences in Paris in 2017.He has contributed to over 440 peer-reviewed publications.



Speaker
The Year in Review
"Translational research"

Christina Curtis, PhD, MSc
Associate Professor of Medicine and Genetics
Stanford University

Trained in molecular and computational biology and jointly appointed in Medicine and Genetics, Dr. Christina Curtis pursues systems biology and computational approaches to establish a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of cancer progression. Dr. Curtis’s laboratory leverages multi-omic data coupled with computational modeling and iterative experimentation in order to define the molecular determinants and dynamics of tumor progression and to identify robust biomarkers. Her research has helped to redefine the molecular map of breast cancer and led to new paradigms in understanding how human tumors progress. Dr. Curtis is the recipient of the awards from the V Foundation for Cancer Research, STOP Cancer, the AACR and is a Kavli Fellow of the National Academy of Sciences. She received the National Institutes of Health Director's Pioneer Award in 2018 and was named a Komen Scholar in 2020. Dr. Curtis is the principal investigator on grants from the NIH/NCI, NHGRI, Department of Defense, American Association for Cancer Research, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Susan G. Komen Foundation and Emerson Collective. She serves on the Editorial Boards of Breast Cancer Research, Cancer Discovery, Carcinogenesis: Integrative Biology, Cell Systems, JCO Precision Oncology and the Journal of Computational Biology.



Panel Member
Special Session
"Trust in Science and Healthcare"

Melissa B. Davis, PhD
Research Faculty Member
Weill Cornell Medicine 

Dr. Melissa Davis is a research faculty member of the Department of Surgery at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York, NY. She holds adjunct faculty appoints in the Department of Genetics at the University of Georgia in Athens, GA and in the Department of Population Health Sciences at Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, MI.Dr. Davis received her Ph.D. in Molecular Genetics at the University of Georgia. Following this, she completed Postdoctoral Fellowships in Functional Genomics and Systems Biology in Departments of Human Genetics at Yale School of Medicine and the University of Chicago, where she also trained at the U-Chicago Center for Interdisciplinary Health Disparities.  This final stop in her training is where she began work in her current research interest:  To identify biological mechanisms of racial disparities in cancer risk and clinical outcomes of cancer diagnoses. The Davis lab has produced findings that have established that unique genetic signatures in both breast and prostate tumors of African and African American patients are enriched for mechanisms that correlate with aggressive tumor progression, which generate novel opportunities for precision medicine applications in minority populations. Her current work builds upon findings in her breast cancer research, where she has identified that and African-Ancestry allele, and the recently discovered tumor expression, of a gene named DARC (ACKR1) is linked to the tumor-specific immune/inflammatory response. Emerging findings of this project indicate that unique immune response in tumors of African Americans may be linked to worse clinical outcomes, yet hold the potential for novel targeted therapies.



Panel Member
Educational Session
"Fine Tuning Risk Assessment and Risk Reduction"

Ashley A. Dedmon, MPH,CHES
Patient Advocate 

Ashley Dedmon is a native Houstonian. Ashley holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Community Health from Prairie View A&M University. She also earned a Master of Public Health from Florida A&M University. She is a Certified Health Education Specialist and holds a Lean Six Sigma Green Belt. Ashley has a diverse and multisectoral career background ranging from non-profit, education, healthcare, policy, and government. Her experience has positioned her with unique business acumen. 

Ashley is a BRCA2+ previvor and was a teen caregiver of two parents with cancer. During her journey, she authored "The Big Discovery." A children's book that facilitates and guides families through a breast cancer diagnosis. Ashley has enthusiastically as a research advocate with Houston Methodist Research Institute CITO. She is a member of the National Cancer Institute and National Institute of Health Physical Sciences-Oncology Advocacy Network, and the Penn Medicine: Basser Center for BRCA Young Leadership Council. She actively volunteers with The Tigerlily Foundation on various health equity initiatives, Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered (FORCE) as a peer navigator and Angles Surviving Cancer. Ashley serves on a myriad of  breast cancer and BRCA workgroups and committees and has presented at institutions such as MD Anderson Cancer Center, Yale University, Houston Methodist Research Institute, and CURE® Education, to name a few. Ashley and her journey have been featured speaker on the TED platform, Women's Health Magazine, and FOX News.

Her greatest accomplishment is being a wife to her husband for seven years and a mother to their two children. When she is not working, she loves to spend time with family, work out, and ride her Peloton.



Moderator
Educational Session
"Emerging Adjuvant Therapies: What's Ready for Prime Time?"

Angela DeMichele, MD, MSCE
Professor of Medicine
Abramson Cancer Center
Penn Medicine

Dr. DeMichele is a Professor of Medicine  at the University of Pennsylvania and holds the Jill and Alan Miller Endowed Professorship in Breast Cancer Excellence. She earned an M.S. in Biochemistry at Brown University, an M.D. at Washington University School of Medicine, where she was a 4-School Physician/Scientist Scholar, and an MSCE at the University of Pennsylvania.  She completed her residency in Internal Medicine, fellowship in Hematology/Oncology and post-doctoral training in Clinical Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania, before joining the faculty in 2000.  She has been the Co-Leader of the Breast Cancer Research Program in the Abramson Cancer Center since 2005, where she also directs both the Breast Cancer Clinical Trials Program and the Breast Cancer TRACR Biobank.  

Dr. DeMichele’s research program is focused on drug development, innovative clinical trial design and investigation of biomarkers for precision therapy.  As Co-Director of Penn’s  2-PREVENT Breast Cancer Translational Center of Excellence, she leads a multidisciplinary team to tackle the problem of breast cancer recurrence through novel clinical trials targeting disseminated and circulating tumor cells, and developing new assays to detect and characterize circulating tumor and dormant cancer cells.  She also leads clinical research teams as Co-Chair of the Breast Committee of the ECOG/ACRIN Cooperative Group, Trial Operations Chair of the I-SPY2 multicenter, neoadjuvant trial, and Penn PI for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium. She has played a pivotal role in the development of numerous targeted therapies, including phase I and II development of the CDK4/6 inhibitor, Palbociclib and is currently co-PI of two international trials: the PALLAS Adjuvant Trial and PATINA Trial for Her2+ disease. She currently holds an R01 from the NCI to fund an innovative clinical trial targeting minimal residual disease to reduce recurrence.  Her research is has been funded by the NIH, NCI, DOD, Komen Foundation, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Cancer Society and other philanthropic sources. She has authored over 150 publications in high impact journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine and Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), is an Associate Editor at Breast Cancer Research and serves on numerous editorial boards. 

Dr. DeMichele also maintains an active breast oncology practice, where she is sought nationally for consultative service.  Her clinical excellence has been recognized in Philadelphia Magazine’s Top Docs.  She also has extensive experience in teaching at all levels of medical education.  She developed EP650, a graduate course on Clinical Trials and Translational Research in the Perelman School of Medicine and has served as Clinical Epidemiology Thesis Advisor to numerous Masters and PhD candidates.  She led the Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania, training many generations of medical students to pursue careers in clinical research, and has mentored over 20 pre and post-doctoral students, in addition to teaching medical students in clinical oncology for over 20 years. She  has held leadership positions in several international societies, including Chairing the Metastatic Breast Cancer Scientific Program and Breast Cancer and Clinical Trials Education Committees of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and serves on numerous national committees including the ASCO Guidelines Advisory Committee and the NCCN Clinical Research Steering Committee.  She previously served as Physician Secretary on the American Board of Internal Medicine Oncology Subspecialty Board. 



Speaker
Educational  Session  
"Immunotherapy in the metastatic setting - chemo backbone and biomarker"

Rebecca Dent, MD, MSc
Head and Senior Consultant
National Cancer Centre Singapore

In Dr. Rebecca Dent's early North American career, she served as Chair of the locally advanced breast cancer program and Head, Breast Cancer Clinical Trials at the Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Center in Toronto, Ontario Canada from 2008-2011 after 10 years of breast oncology there. 

In February 2011, she began the next phase of her career as a consultant and now senior consultant at the National Cancer Center in Singapore (NCCS). Recognizing the need for a pan-Asian regional educational interaction she co-founded and co-chaired nine Asia Pacific Breast Cancer Summits. This is a multidisciplinary meeting for the treatment of breast cancer in which they are able to attract over 2000 attendees from over 25 countries. She is a steering committee member and PI for a number of large international trials in TNBC. They have secured funding for an investigator initiated global study evaluating the role of PARP inhibition with or without immune checkpoint inhibition in platinum sensitive TNBC. This and other TNBC research have been cited extensively with the number of citations now exceeding 10,000 and an h-index of 42. 

She has served on a number of prominent international committees such as the American Society of Clinical Oncology Scientific Committee (ER/HER2 track), Education Chair Breast Track ASCO Annual Meeting, the Editorial Board of the Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO) and now Lancet Oncology, Scientific Chair of European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) Asia and Chair, ESMO Metastatic Breast Track and Scientific Committee Member ASCO Breakthrough Asia.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 14  
"Clinical Translational Updates in Invasive Lobular Carcinoma"

Christine Desmedt, PhD
Head of Lab
KU Leuven

Christine Desmedt received her bio-engineer degree in Cells and Genes Biotechnology from the KU Leuven in 2000. In September 2000, she started working at the Jules Bordet Institute, Brussels, an autonomous comprehensive cancer center devoted entirely to the fight against cancer. For two years, she worked as a clinical monitor for the Breast European Adjuvant Studies Group (Br.E.A.S.T), coordinating the monitoring activities of external groups for the conduct of breast cancer trials. This experience gave her the necessary clinical background for carrying optimal translational breast cancer research.

In 2003, she joined the Breast Cancer Translational Research Laboratory of this Institute, headed by Prof. Christos Sotiriou, where she started a PhD entitled “Multimarker approach for improving breast cancer treatment tailoring” with Prof. Martine Piccart as co-promoter. In 2004, she earned a master in bio-medical sciences at the Université Libre de Bruxelle (U.L.B.) and defended successfully her PhD in 2008. Until 2018, she acted as the Translational Research Coordinator of the lab, conducting research projects and assisting the head of the lab in the scientific and administrative management of the lab. From October 2010 till April 2011, she was a visiting scientist at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, UK, under the supervision of Dr. P. Campbell in the Cancer Genome Project lab. This allowed her to have a detailed introduction to next generation sequencing and to develop important collaborations in the field of genomics and cancer.In October 2018, Christine Desmedt was appointed as Assistant Professor at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KU Leuven, Leuven), where she is heading the Laboratory for Translational Breast Cancer Research. The main research areas of the Lab are the molecular characterization of breast cancer, including the unraveling of metastatic progression, the better understanding of rarer cancer subtypes such as lobular and mucinous breast tumors, the identification of mechanisms of treatment efficacy and the impact of patient adiposity on breast cancer biology. She is also the co-leader of the Breast Cancer group of the Leuven Cancer Institute (LKI) with Prof. Dr. Hans Wildiers. She is also co-developer and co-leader of the breast cancer research autopsy program at UZ/KU Leuven with Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Floris. Prof. Desmedt is very active in lobular breast cancer research. She is the co-founder and co-coordinator of the European Lobular Breast Cancer Consortium (www.elbcc.org) together with Prof. P. Derksen (University of Utrecht, The Netherlands) and Prof. Dr. A. Salomon (Institut Curie, Paris, France), and the vice-president of the COST Action CA 19138 LOBSTERPOT, entirely devoted to lobular breast cancer research. She is also co-coordinator of the Doctoral School Cancer at the KU Leuven.



Panel Member
Molecular Tumor Board

Susan Domchek, MD
Executive Director, Basser Center for BRCA
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine 

Susan M. Domchek, MD is the Basser Professor in Oncology at the Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania. She serves as Executive Director of the Basser Center for BRCA at the Abramson Cancer Center and Director of the Mariann and Robert MacDonald Cancer Risk Evaluation Program.

Her work focuses on the genetic evaluation and medical management of individuals with inherited risk factors for cancer. Dr. Domchek is particularly interested in developing new cancer therapies, such as PARP inhibitors, for breast cancer due to genetic risk factors.

An elected member of the National Academy of Medicine, the American Society of Clinical Investigation, and the Association of American Physicians, Dr. Domchek is also a Fellow of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (FASCO).  A significant contributor to the oncology literature, she has authored/co-authored more than 350 articles appearing in scholarly journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Association and the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Domchek also serves on a number of editorial review boards, including the Journal of Clinical Oncology, as well as on the Scientific Advisory Board for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.



Speaker
Plenary Lecture
"Genomic Profiling in Early Stage ER Positive Breast Cancers/Precision Medicine"

Mitch Dowsett, BSc, PhD, FMedSci
Consultant Clinical Scientist
Royal Marsden Hospital

Prof. Mitch Dowsett has been involved in researching hormonal aspects of breast cancer for over 40 years and have covered issues relating to etiology, prevention, prognosis, treatment and treatment resistance. He has led collaborative initiatives on the comparative assessment of multiple genomic signatures used for management of ER-positive breast cancer. Most recently his group has focused on  genomic analyses of ER-positive disease treated with estrogen deprivation by aromatase inhibition in large presurgical clinical trials encompassing several thousand patients and extended these to studies of aromatase inhibitors combined with CDK4/6 inhibition. These studies have enabled them to identify the molecular features and alterations that characterize and differentiate estrogen responsive from resistant tumors and the effectiveness of CDK4/6 inhibition in those resistant tumors. 

He serves on the ASCO/CAP Steering Committee for guidelines on ER/PgR and HER2 and co-chairs the International Ki67 in Breast Cancer Working Party. He has been an author of over 700 papers.

His awards include the William McGuire Memorial Award and the Brinker Award both of which were made at SABCS.



Speaker
Mini-Symposia
"CRISPR screens to identify novel DNA repair defects synthetic lethal therapies"

Daniel Durocher, PhD
Senior Scientist
Lunenfeld- Tanenbaum Research Institute
Sinai Health System

Daniel Durocher is a Senior Investigator at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute where he also acts as Director of the Biomedical Program. He is a Full Professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics at the University of Toronto and a Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Molecular Genetics of the DNA Damage Response. Dr. Durocher studied at Université de Montréal and McGill University before undertaking his postdoctoral training at the University of Cambridge. Dr. Durocher’s overarching interest lies in understanding how cells maintain genome integrity, with an emphasis on the detection, signaling and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. His work often employs functional genomics as a tool to chart DNA repair and genome stability processes, with the added aim of discovering novel cancer drug targets. Dr. Durocher has received numerous awards for his work, including the 2015 Paul Marks Prize from Memorial Sloan-Kettering. Dr. Durocher also co-founded Repare Therapeutics, an oncology drug discovery company that aims to discover new drugs that target genome instability in cancer based on the principle of synthetic lethality.



Panel Member
Special Session
"Trust in Science and Healthcare"

Ysabel Duron, BA
Founder and Executive Director
The Latino Cancer Institute

Ysabel Duron is a pioneering, award-winning, Latina journalist, a cancer survivor, and for the last 21 years, a leader in Latino/Hispanic cancer education, advocacy and research collaboration. In 2017, Ms. Duron founded The Latino Cancer Institute (TLCI) a nationwide network dedicated to developing and sharing best practice programs to enhance the work of Latino community service agencies, to provide collaboration with the global cancer research community, and drive policy to address the issues and diminish the burden of Latino cancer. Duron has served on the Institutional Review Board (IRB) for the All of Us Research Program at the NIH since 2016. She is a member of the Advisory Council of the California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine (CIAPM), and a Board member of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM /Stem Cell Research). One of her first policy acts was to drive a requirement that scientific applicants for CIRM taxpayer dollars must show an inclusive plan for the engagement of racial/ethnic communities in clinical trials. This now extends to most research. Reviewers must take these plans into consideration and patient advocates can award up to ten points for the worthiest proposals. Since then, diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) have been wrapped into most of CIRM’s internal and external policies. Duron also serves on CommuniVax: A Coalition to Strengthen the Community’s Involvement in an Equitable Vaccination Rollout, at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security. Most recently, CommuniVax recommendations, from its second national report, helped inform President Biden’s rollout of a new, 65 billion dollar 10-year pandemic response plan that specifically calls for the engagement and funding of community-based organizations and community health workers. (https://www.centerforhealthsecurity.org/our-work/). 

As the past founder and CEO of Latinas Contra Cancer for 14 years, Duron and her team addressed gaps in services along the cancer continuum, providing education, navigation into screening, support groups and patient navigation for the Spanish speaking, low income, immigrant and undocumented. During her tenure, Duron launched the bi-ennial National Latino Cancer Summit dedicated to research on Latinos and cancer, from 2008 through 2016, bringing together researchers with community agencies and community health workers to network, learn from each other and collaborate. Over 1000 people attended these events with at least 25% attending all 5 Summits. Duron also piloted a community navigator in the public health care system cancer center in Santa Clara County (CA), where the navigator supported at least 1000 Spanish speaking cancer patients over a decade from diagnosis through survivorship to end of life. Over these two decades Duron and her teams have engaged in collaborative research with institutions such as Georgetown University (Engaging Latina cancer survivors, their caregivers and community partners in a randomized, controlled trial:Nueva Vida intervention), George Washington University Cancer Center,  UCSF (Nuevo Amanacer - Results of a randomized control trial of a community based, peer delivered stress management intervention to improve quality of life among Latina breast cancer survivors Oct 15, 2015), UCLA (NIH/CEAL funded media series project, Reporting from the Frontlines of a Pandemic) and Stanford (Community Health Workers and Precision Medicine).She has joined as a supporting author in a number of research papers, and written articles that have appeared in Spanish language and Hispanic publications on stem cell research (Title: Proposition 14 Will Continue Efforts in Creating New Opportunities-La Opinion, Oct 25,2020), the value of engaging in research (Healthy Hispanic Living - We still don't know enough about Latina and breast cancer/ 12-02-2015/  Patients Should Engage in Research/ Let's Embrace Research, It Can Teach Us the Darndest Things/  3-24-2015)



Moderator
Translational Science Forum
"HER2 Heterogeneity"

Matthew J. Ellis, MB, BChir, BSc, PhD, FRCP
Director
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr Matthew James Ellis a physician scientist who completed his training at the University of London (PhD) and the University of Cambridge (MB BChir).  He is currently the Director for the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine where he coordinates an interdisciplinary team of oncologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, basic scientists and statisticians focused on improving our ability to prevent, detect and treat breast cancer.  In addition, he is the Associate Director for Translational Research at the Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, with a broad role in promoting translational research.  

His research has focuses on estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. He has championed neoadjuvant endocrine therapy as a non-toxic alternative to chemotherapy for promoting breast-conserving therapy in postmenopausal women with ER+ HER2- stage 2 and 3 disease (Journal of Clinical Oncology 2001).  He developed the Ki67 proliferation marker-based Preoperative Endocrine Prognostic Index (Journal of Clinical Oncology 2017) that is now undergoing a large validation study (the ALTERNATE study).  These clinical studies have provided the context and tumor specimens for seminal investigations into the ER+ breast cancer somatic genome, with insights into clonal heterogeneity (Nature Communications 2015), new tumor suppressor gene discovery specific to ER+ disease and new therapeutic targets (Nature 2012).  These include activating mutations in the HER2 gene that have been shown respond to HER2 kinase inhibition in clinical trials, particularly metastatic lobular carcinoma (Cancer Discovery 2013, Clinical Cancer Research 2017).  He also is a pioneer of patient-derived xenograft research (PDX).  A PDX study in triple negative breast cancer revealed clonal remodeling during brain metastasis (Nature 2010).  PDX analysis also revealed acquired resistance to endocrine therapy is a consequence of ESR1 ligand-binding mutation; ESR1 amplification and most uniquely chromosomal translocation causing fusions between the N terminus of ESR1 and the C-terminus of genes that can confer constitutive transcriptional activity (Cell Reports 2013).  To improve our ability to understand the complex genomic changes he has been working with the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium at the US National Cancer Institute to develop proteogenomic analysis of breast cancer.  This mass spectrometry-based approach recently elucidated the functional consequences of somatic mutations, narrowed candidate nominations for driver genes within large deletions and amplified regions and identified therapeutic targets (Nature 2016, Nature Communications 2017, Cell 2020).  

His work has been cited over 58,000 times with an h-index of 97(Google Scholar).



Chair
Spotlight Session 2
"Insights to CDK4/6i resistance: Novel models and clinical/translational genomics"

Richard S. Finn, MD
Professor
Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA

Dr Finn is a Professor of Clinical Medicine in the Division of Hematology/ Oncology at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine and Director of the Signal Transduction Program in the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA.

He currently splits his time between patient care and laboratory and clinical research.  His research interests lie in the development of molecular targeted agents and biomarkers in liver cancer and breast cancer.  Dr Finn has served as principal and sub-investigator in trials exploring the use of targeted therapies in breast and hepatocellular cancers. He has a particular interest in identifying predictive markers of response to novel therapeutics. His work has been published in journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine, The Lancet, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Lancet Oncology, Cancer Research, Clinical Cancer Research, Hepatology, Cancer Cell and elsewhere. Dr Finn has also given oral presentations at major meetings including American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), European Cancer Conference (ECCO/ ESMO), and the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR) and others.  An active cancer researcher, he has been involved in the development of several novel therapeutics in cancer medicine.  He has brought several practice changing advanced to cancer medicine. He played a lead role in  the approval of palbociclib (Ibrance), the first CDK 4/6 inhibitor in cancer medicine, from pre-clinical development to global registration and more recently the combination of  atezolizumab and bevacizumab for the treatment of advanced liver cancer.

Dr Finn is a member of ASCO, American Association of Cancer Research (AACR) and the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO).  He is on the editorial board of Clinical Cancer Research and Breast Cancer Research.



Panel Member
Educational Session 
"Refining Heredity Risk"

Sue Friedman, DVM
Executive Director 
FORCE - Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered

Dr. Sue Friedman was a practicing small animal veterinarian when she was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 33, and afterwards learned she carried a BRCA mutation. She recognized gaps in information and resources for people making medical decisions around hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). She was determined that no one else should face hereditary cancer alone. After finishing treatment, she founded Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered (FORCE) in 1999 to fill the information void for people facing hereditary cancers and to help them advocate for themselves. FORCE serves a diverse population across the hereditary cancer care continuum, including the newly diagnosed, long-term cancer survivors, previvors, caregivers, and relatives; requiring our organization to personalize the information and resources we provide. 

As founder and Executive Director of the nonprofit FORCE organization, Dr. Friedman has twenty-two years of experience assessing and addressing the unique needs of individuals affected by hereditary cancer. Her role at FORCE involves  directing their research and education efforts.



Speaker
Educational Session 
"Artificial intelligence: guiding the pathologists’ eyes"

Thomas J. Fuchs, DSc
Dean of Artificial Intelligence and Human Health
Mount Sinai Health System



Speaker
Susan G. Komen Brinker® Award for Scientific Distinction in Clinical Research

Judy E. Garber, MD, MPH
Susan F. Smith Chair
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Judy E. Garber is a professor of medicine with sub-specialties in breast oncology and in clinical cancer genetics. She has multiple publications in refereed journals and is generally considered an expert in the treatment of triple negative breast cancer in particular, as well as breast cancers occurring in carriers of mutations in cancer predisposition genes. She has an MPH in chronic disease epidemiology as well, which has enabled her to develop specialized expertise in cancer risk estimation. She runs a clinical program in breast cancer risk estimation and management and in clinical cancer genetics broadly but with a particular focus in breast cancer genetics



Speaker
Educational Session
"Polygenic risk score: Should clinicians use it"

Montserrat Garcia-Closas, MD, DrPH
Deputy Director, DCEG
National Cancer Institute

Dr. Montserrat García-Closas received her M.D. from the University of Barcelona, Spain, a Master of Public Health in quantitative methods, and a Doctorate of Public Health in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health. She joined DCEG in 1996 as a postdoctoral fellow, became a tenure-track investigator in 1999 and a tenured senior investigator in 2007. From 2008-2010, she was a visiting scientist at the Department of Oncology and Strangeways Laboratory, Cambridge University, U.K. In 2010, she became a Professor of Epidemiology at the Division of Genetic and Epidemiology of the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR), University of London, U.K. In 2015, she returned to DCEG as Deputy Director and senior investigator. She was appointed Interim Branch Chief for the Integrative Tumor Epidemiology Branch (ITEB) from 2016-2020, and in 2020 she was appointed Director of the Trans-Divisional Research Program (TDRP).

As Deputy Director for the NCI Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG), and Director of the TDRP, Dr. García-Closas focuses not only on her own research interests, but also on the management of the broad scientific program of the Division



Panel Member
Special Session
Trust in Science and Healthcare

Sophia George, PhD
Research Associate Professor
University of Miami Health System

Conducts studies to understand pathogenesis of sporadic and hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. The lab uses molecular genetics, epigenetics and transcriptomics to study disease pathogenesis and overall outcome of women diagnosed with these diseases. High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) remains the deadliest gynecological cancer due to presentation at advanced stage with metastatic disease; eventually become drug chemotherapy resistant. Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a similarly aggressive tumor with poor prognosis. HGSC and TNBC are genomically unstable due to loss-of-function mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM, RAD51 and TP53 genes involved in DNA damage response. These breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes also regulate cellular metabolism, growth, stemness, antioxidant and detoxification processes. Black and Ashkenazi Jewish women are at increased risk for developing these diseases. The HBOC laboratory uses molecular epidemiology, translational and basic sciences techniques to study disease pathogenesis in hereditary and sporadic HGSC and TNBC in these populations.



Presenter - Pro
Debate
"RxPONDER: Was it all OFS?"

Michael Gnant, MD, FACS
Professor of Surgery
Medical University of Vienna

Dr. Michael Gnant is currently working as a Professor in the Department of Department of Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Austria. His research interests includes Surgery. He  is serving as an editorial member and reviewer of several international reputed journals. Dr. Michael Gnant is the member of many international affiliations. He has authored of many research articles/books related to Surgery.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 2
"Insights to CDK4/6i resistance: Novel models and clinical/translational genomics"

Shom Goel, B Med Sci (Hons), MBBS (Hons), FRACP, PhD
Medical Oncologist and Group Leader
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre

Dr Goel is a clinician-scientist at the University of Melbourne and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre. Having spent ten years in Boston, where he completed his doctoral and postdoctoral research, Dr Goel returned to Australia in 2019. In addition to maintaining a clinical practice as an oncologist, he also leads a research group positions itself at the intersection of cell cycle biology, epigenetics, and tumour immunology in breast cancer. They have developed several new transgenic mouse models of breast cancer, which have proven valuable for uncovering new mechanisms of drug activity and resistance, and their work has been published in high-impact journals including Nature, Cancer Cell and Nature Cancer. He serves as either Global PI or Translational PI for four randomised clinical trials in breast cancer and was recently appointed Chair-Elect of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Education Committee. Dr Goel is also a recent awardee of a prestigious Snow Fellowship which will accelerate his laboratory’s work from 2022 – 2030.   



Moderator
Clinical Case Discussion

Matthew P. Goetz, MD
Erivan K. Haub Family Professor of Cancer Research Honoring Richard F. Emslander, M.D.
Mayo Clinic

Matthew P. Goetz, M.D., is a consultant in the Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Oncology, at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Dr. Goetz joined the staff of Mayo Clinic in 2003 and holds the academic rank of professor of oncology and pharmacology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science. He is recognized with the distinction of the Erivan K. Haub Family Professorship in Cancer Research Honoring Richard F. Emslander, M.D.

Dr. Goetz received his B.A. in music at Wheaton College and his M.D. at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine. He completed an internship in internal medicine and a residency in internal medicine at the University of Michigan in addition to a postdoctoral fellowship in hematology and oncology at Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical Education.

Dr. Goetz leads breast cancer research activities at Mayo Clinic where he is chair of the Mayo Breast Cancer Research Disease Group, co-leader of the Women’s Cancer Program within the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Director of the Mayo Breast Cancer SPORE and Vice Chair, Academic and Community Cancer Research United (ACCRU).

Dr. Goetz has been extensively involved in both translational research as well as in the conduct of early- and late-phase clinical trials, with a focus on germline and tumor factors that alter endocrine responsiveness including the development of novel SERM’s as well as CDK 4/6 inhibitors. A notable area of research focus has been the pharmacogenetics of tamoxifen, where Dr. Goetz has led multiple studies demonstrating the importance of CYP2D6 genetic variation as a predictor of tamoxifen response, resulting in Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guidelines for use of CYP2D6 genotype for tamoxifen dosing. Emanating from this work, and in collaboration with the Developmental Therapeutics Program of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Dr. Goetz has led a team of investigators in the development of a novel formulation of endoxifen for the treatment of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer through both phase I and II clinical studies.   

Dr. Goetz also worked to develop prospective “multi-omic” prospective studies including the Breast Cancer Genome-Guided Therapy (BEAUTY) and PROMISE studies, wherein blood and tumor biopsies are obtained for comprehensive “omic analyses’ and patient derived xenografts (PDX).  Together, the combined “omic”, PDX, and clinical trial outcome data provide a resource to drive new therapeutic approaches for treatment resistant breast cancer.

In addition to his clinical and research roles, Dr. Goetz is active in professional organizations. He currently serves on steering committees and panels including the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, the NCI Breast Cancer Steering Committee, and the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium and the Academic and Community Cancer Research United Clinical Trial Group.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Macro and micro: Macrophage and microbiome diversity in the breast cancer microenvironment"

Jennifer Guerriero, PhD
Lead Investigator
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Dr. Guerriero received her Bachelor’s degree in BioChemistry from Northeastern University and has a PhD in Molecular and Cellular Biology and Immunology and Pathology from Stony Brook University where she trained under Dr. Wei-Xing Zong and completed her thesis entitled, “A study of cell death pathways and innate immunity in cancer chemotherapy”. Dr. Guerriero completed her postdoctoral training in the laboratory of Dr. Anthony Letai at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute where she investigated the role of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) in breast cancer and identified novel mechanisms to target pro-tumor macrophages to an anti-tumor phenotype to induce tumor regression. Dr. Guerriero then joined the laboratory of Dr. Elizabeth Mittendorf as an Instructor in the where she investigated macrophage biology and diversity in breast cancer.

Dr. Guerriero is now a Lead Investigator and runs an independent laboratory at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, she serves as the Director of the Breast Tumor Immunology Laboratory (BTIL) in the Susan F. Smith Women’s Cancer Program at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and is an Instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School. The Guerriero Laboratory focuses on developing novel strategies to modulate TAMs and works on unraveling the complexity of TAM biology, ontogeny and metabolic regulation with the goal of developing clinically effective strategies to target TAMs to promote T-cell activation and weaken the immune-suppressive TME to improve immunotherapy response rates. As the Director of the BTIL, Dr. Guerriero’s translational research efforts are focused on investigating innovated methods to modulate the immune response in breast cancer as well as to better understand the mechanistic basis for sensitivity and resistance to currently available immunotherapies. The major goals of Dr. Guerriero’s work are to elucidate the molecular and functional regulation of TAM phenotype and subsets, identify how tumor macrophages inhibit T cell function and limit the effectiveness of immunotherapy and identify novel strategies to target macrophages therapeutically. 



Speaker
Basic Science Forum
"PR"

Christy Hagan, PhD
Associate Professor
University of Kansas Medical Center

Dr. Christy Hagan's research is focused on how hormones affect breast cancer growth; in particular how progesterone, working through the progesterone receptor (PR), influences breast cancer progression. The progesterone receptor, a nuclear transcription factor, is heavily post-translationally modified via phosphorylation, and these modifications are key to determining many aspects of receptor function. During her post-doctoral fellowship, she characterized how phosphorylation at multiple sites in PR dictates highly context-specific effects on transcription, as well as how these phosphorylation events dictate key protein-protein interactions that bridge PR action and cytoplasmic kinase signaling. Understanding how mitogenic protein kinases (like ck2, MAPK, cdk2) alter PR is critical to understanding breast tumor etiology and developing better treatments. In environments with increased kinase activity, like breast cancer, PR may be aberrantly phosphorylated on key target residues, inappropriately driving proliferative gene programs in the absence of hormones. Her independent laboratory has focused on how PR may promote breast tumor progression through evasion of immune surveillance. Interferon-activation is a key step in immune surveillance and destruction of nascent tumors. They recently described how interferon-stimulated genes, an end product of interferon signaling, are transcriptionally repressed by PR. This represents a novel subset of genes not previously known to be regulated by PR. Moreover, PR-dependent attenuation of interferon signaling suggests a mechanism through which PR may aid early breast cancer lesions in escaping immune surveillance. As such, they have shown that PR promotes immunosuppressive changes in the immune microenvironment of the mammary gland. These data have significant implications for the use of progesterone-containing hormone replacement therapy in post-menopausal women, as well as underscore the importance of studying anti-progestins (synthetic progesterone) as novel chemo-preventative agents for breast cancer. Moreover, modulating PR action in breast tumors may make these tumors more susceptible to treatment with new immunotherapy agents, such as checkpoint inhibitors. Dr. Hagan has put together an excellent collaborative team to execute the experiments propose herein. She has worked in the field of cancer research for over 15 years, and remain committed to understanding the biology of breast cancer through biochemistry, molecular biology, genomics, epigenetics and mouse models of cancer.



Panel Member
View From The Trenches-What Will You Do On Monday Morning?

Erika Hamilton, MD
Director, Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Program
Sarah Cannon Research Institute/Tennessee Oncology

Dr. Hamilton received her undergraduate degree from Washington and Lee University in Virginia and received a NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship.  She then completed her medical degree and residency from University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. She received her fellowship training in hematology and oncology from Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, where she was recognized as a Top 5 Finalist for Duke’s Annual House staff Fellow Teaching Award. Dr. Hamilton is board certified in both internal medicine and oncology.

She joined Sarah Cannon Research Institute (SCRI) as investigator in drug development with a women’s cancer focus in 2013. In 2015 she became the director of the breast cancer research program and gynecologic cancer research program.  She sees patients in both the phase I drug development unit and the standard of care clinic including phase II/ III clinical trials.  She is also a partner within Tennessee Oncology. 

Dr. Hamilton is the Chair of ASCO’s (American Society of Clinical Oncology) Scientific Committee for Metastatic Breast Cancer for 2019-2020 and has served on that committee as a member for the past 3 years.  She also serves as an Associate Editor for Clinical Breast Cancer.  



Speaker
Educational Session
"Escalating and de-escalation - titrating the right regimen in early stage HER2 positive"

Nadia Harbeck, MD, PhD
Director, Breast Center
LMU University Hospital

Nadia Harbeck, MD, PhD, is head of the Breast Center and holds the chair for Conservative Oncology at the Dept. of OB&GYN, University of Munich (LMU), Germany. She obtained her specialist degree (OB&GYN) at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and her medical degree from the University of Munich. From 2005-2009, she was an assistant professor and head of Conservative Senology at TUM and from 2009-2011, she was head of the Breast Center at the University of Cologne, Germany.

Professor Harbeck is a member of the expert panel issuing the yearly updated evidence-based AGO Guidelines for breast cancer therapy in Germany (www.ago-online.de). She is scientific director of the West German Study Group (www.wsg-online.com). From 2009-2015, she served on the executive board of the EORTC as the chair of the translational research division. Professor Harbeck is principal investigator or steering committee member of numerous breast cancer trials, particularly with novel targeted compounds. Her translational research focuses on prognostic and predictive factors in breast cancer and other solid tumours. She has a strong interest in eHealth and is a co-developer of CANKADO, an international digital patient diary (www.cankado.com).

Professor Harbeck has authored more than 500 papers in peer-reviewed journals (h-index 87) and is coordinating editor-in-chief of Breast Care (Karger Publishers). She is a panel member of several international breast cancer consensus conferences, such as for advanced breast cancer (ABC), breast cancer in young women (BCY), and early breast cancer (St Gallen).

In 2020, Professor Harbeck received the 2020 ESMO Lifetime Achievement Award. She has also numerous other recognitions of her clinical and translational research such as the 2015 Bavarian Cancer Patient Award, the 2012 Claudia von Schilling Award, the 2008 EBCC Award (Emmanuel van der Schueren Lecture), the 2002 AGO Schmidt-Matthiesen Award, a 2001 AACR Award, and the 2001 ASCO Fellowship Merit Award for the highest ranking abstract



Speaker
Educational Session
"Emergent pharmacologic interventions for prevention: Non endocrine treatments"

Brandy Heckman-Stoddard, PhD, MPH
Chief, Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group
National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention

Dr. Brandy Heckman-Stoddard received a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Molecular and Cellular Biology at Baylor College of Medicine focusing on the intersection of Rho and IGF signaling in mammary gland development and breast cancer before joining the National Cancer Institute as a Cancer Prevention Fellow. During the fellowship she completed a Master's in Public Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health working with the Institute for Global Tobacco Control and the Evidence-Based Practice Center. During her time at NCI as a fellow, she focused on breast cancer prevention research including preclinical development and early phase clinical trials.

Dr. Heckman-Stoddard became a Program Director within the Division of Cancer Prevention's Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group in 2011 and became Chief of the group in 2018.  Dr. Heckman-Stoddard's research focuses on drug development for breast cancer prevention and biomarker development. She is particularly interested in local delivery of agents, alternate dosing strategies, biomarkers of efficacy to reduce the number needed to treat, and targeting of stem cells. She serves as Program Director for the early phase breast cancer prevention clinical trials grants portfolio for which she received an NCI Director's award in 2020 and Scientific Lead of early phase breast cancer clinical trials within the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention Early Phase Prevention Consortia and the Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Network (CP-CTNet). Dr. Heckman-Stoddard is also the NCI Project Scientist for an NCI-NIDDK collaboration examining cancer incidence within the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study a randomized study of metformin, lifestyle intervention, versus placebo as well as the Breast Cancer Project Scientist for Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network (CISNET).



Moderator
Educational Session
"Evidence Based Integrative Therapies - During and Beyond Treatment"

Dawn L. Hershman, MD, MS
Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology
Columbia University

Dr. Hershman is an American Cancer Society Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology with Tenure at Columbia University Medical Center. She is Director of Breast Oncology and Leader of the Population Science Program of the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center. She has developed nationally recognized expertise in cancer care delivery, late-effects of cancer therapy, health outcomes and health disparities research. She has received research funding from the NCI, American Cancer Society, ASCO, Department of Defense, Susan Komen Foundation, and the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. She has mentored numerous faculty members who have been granted mentored career development awards. She has a strong publication record with over 400 papers and including many in high profile journals, with many receiving national press coverage.

She has several national leadership roles in oncology. She is the Vice-Chair of the SWOG NCORP research base and Co-Chair of the Cancer Care Delivery Committee. She serves on the breast cancer care delivery steering committees of NCI. She is on the editorial board for the Journal of Clinical Oncology and is an Associate Editor at the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. She is a member of the American Association of Clinical Investigation and the Award in Breast Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, a Conquer Cancer Foundation Research Professorship in Breast Cancer Comparative Effectiveness Research, the Advanced Medical Achievement Award from the Avon Foundation. She is a Komen Scholar and was awarded the Conquer Cancer Foundation Women who Conquer Cancer Mentorship Award.



Speaker
Special Session
"COVID-19 and Cancer"

Peter Hotez, MD, PhD
University Professor of Biology
Baylor College of Medicine



Speaker
Special Session
"Learning by leading- lessons learned"

Clifford A. Hudis, MD, FACP, FASCO
Chief Executive Officer
American Society of Clinical Oncology

Dr. Hudis is the Chief Executive Officer of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). He also serves as the Executive Vice Chair of its Conquer Cancer Foundation and Chair of ASCO’s CancerLinQ. Dr. Hudis previously served in a variety of volunteer and leadership roles at ASCO, including as its President during the Society’s 50th anniversary year (2013-14). Before coming to ASCO full-time, he was the Chief of the Breast Medicine Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York City and Professor of Medicine at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University. As CEO of ASCO, Dr. Hudis is responsible for delivering on the board’s strategic goals through education, research, and support for the delivery of the highest quality of care by the Society’s nearly 45,000 members.



Speaker
Educational Session
"The ideal partner to HER2 directed therapies"

Sara A. Hurvitz, MD
Professor of Medicine
University of California - Los Angeles (UCLA)

Sara A Hurvitz, MD, is Professor of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA); co-director of the Santa Monica-UCLA Outpatient Oncology Practice; Medical Director of the Clinical Research Unit of the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA; and Director of Breast Oncology. Dr. Hurvitz earned her MD from the University of Southern California. She served internship/residency at UCLA, was Chief Resident of internal medicine and completed a hematology-oncology fellowship at UCLA in 2006. Dr. Hurvitz received board-certification in internal medicine, hematology, and medical oncology.   

Dr. Hurvitz has won numerous awards over the past few years, among them the Marni Levine Memorial Breast Cancer Research Award 2008 through 2015. She has an active clinical practice specializing in the treatment of women with breast cancer. She is involved in designing, implementing and leading multiple national and international clinical trials testing new targeted therapies and also leads the preclinical evaluation of novel breast cancer targets in the Translation Oncology Research Laboratory at UCLA. 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Lifestyle: Exercise and diet"

Neil M. Iyengar, MD
Assistant Attending
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Neil M. Iyengar is a clinical-translational investigator and board certified medical oncologist specializing in the care of patients with breast cancer. His translational focus centers on the oncogenic implications of metabolic health and energy balance. At Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) he has developed a robust biobanking system in which they collect and store tissues and blood from patients undergoing surgery for cancer treatment. Their group was the first to report adipose tissue inflammation as a central driver of obesity-related cancers. They discovered that the presence of adipose inflammation is associated with an immune-privileged microenvironment in addition to systemic insulin resistance and other metabolic disturbances which together drive the development of primary cancers and cancer recurrence. While they have elucidated these mechanisms predominantly in the context of breast cancer, they also have active lines of research in prostate, head and neck, endometrial, ovarian, and renal cancers. Building on their mechanistic findings, his research program is now supported by grants from the National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, and others to extend this work and develop lifestyle interventions that offset the negative impact of energy imbalance on cancer development and progression. They currently have 4 actively accruing randomized control trials of diet and/or exercise interventions for patients with cancer and 2 ongoing cancer prevention trials for high risk individuals. 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Can radiation replace ALND after + SLNB"

Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil
Newman Family Professor
University of Michigan

Reshma Jagsi, M.D., D.Phil., is Newman Family Professor and Deputy Chair in the Department of Radiation Oncology and Director of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine at the University of Michigan. Gender equity in academic medicine has been a key area of her scholarly focus and leadership since she was a trainee, and she brings to her research in this area her perspective as a physician and social scientist to promote evidence-based intervention. Author of over 300 articles in peer-reviewed journals, including multiple high-impact studies in journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine, the Lancet, and JAMA, her research to promote gender equity has been funded by an R01 grant from the National Institutes of Health as well as large independent grants from the Doris Duke Foundation and several other philanthropic foundations. She has mentored dozens of others in research investigating women’s under-representation in senior positions in academic medicine and the mechanisms that must be targeted to promote equity. Active in organized medicine, she has served on the Steering Committee of the AAMC's Group on Women in Medicine in Science and now serves on the Board of Directors of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. She was part of the Lancet’s advisory committee for its theme issue on women in science, medicine, and global health, which served to foster additional research. Her research also includes leadership of numerous other substantial studies in the field of bioethics, including a current NIH R01-funded investigation using deliberative democratic approaches to illuminate patients’ attitudes towards secondary use of data collected in routine clinical encounters and a current Greenwall Foundation-funded investigation of patient attitudes towards approaches used by hospitals to encourage donations from grateful patients. Also an internationally recognized clinical trialist and health services researcher in breast cancer, her work is frequently featured in the popular media, including coverage by the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, NPR, and national network nightly news. Frequently invited as a keynote speaker, she has delivered invited talks at over 50 institutions and professional societies, including the AAMC, the NIH, and the National Academy of Medicine and National Academy of Sciences. Her contributions have been recognized with her election to the American Society of Clinical Investigation and the Leadership Award of the AAMC’s Group on Women in Medicine and Science.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 14
"Clinical Translational Updates in Invasive Lobular Carcinoma"

Rachel Jankowitz, MD
Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine
Penn Medicine Abramson Cancer Center

Dr. Rachel Jankowitz is an Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine in the Division of Hematology/Oncology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Director of the Rena Rowan Breast Center at the Penn Medicine Abramson Cancer Center.  Her clinical practice is focused on care of patients with breast cancer and her research has centered around invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) and breast cancer clinical trials.  She serves as a member of the scientific advisory board for the Lobular Breast Cancer Alliance (LBCA).  

In collaboration with colleagues from the University of Pittsburgh and the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC), and thanks to support from a Komen Career Catalyst Research Grant awarded by the Susan G. Komen® organization, she initiated a prospective clinical trial for patients with ILC: TBCRC037, A Trial of Endocrine Response in Women With Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer (NCT02206984).    



Discussant
Spotlight Session 1
"Endocrine Resistance: Novel mechanisms and emerging new therapies"

Rinath Jeselsohn, MD
Assistant Professor
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr Jeselsohn is a breast oncologist and physician scientist at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Her research focuses on mechanisms of tumor progression, metastases and endocrine resistance in hormone receptor positive breast cancer. She studies genomic and epigenetic alterations in breast cancer, employing pre-clinical models and human derived specimens. Her work in pre-clinical models of endocrine resistance demonstrates novel roles for the RUNX2 and SOX9 transcription factors in tamoxifen resistance. Her work along with the work of other groups has led to the identification of ESR1 mutations that render constitutive activity and endocrine resistance. She has been a moderator for poster sessions at the SABCS in the past and has also presented at the educational session at the SABCS. She has been awarded research funding from the NIH, the Alliance and private foundations. 



Speaker
Translational Science Forum
"ER+ word salad decoded: SERD, SERM, SERCA, CERAN, PROTAC"

Komal Jhaveri, MD, FACP
Attending, Breast Medicine and Early Drug Development Service
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Jhaveri is an Assistant Attending Physician and serves as the Section Head for the Endocrine Therapy Research Program within the Breast Medicine Service and as the Clinical Director for the Early Drug Development Service at MSKCC.  She is also an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City. She earned her medical degree from the University of Mumbai followed by a training in nuclear medicine also from the University of Mumbai. She later completed her Internal Medicine residency from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (Morningside/West) Program in New York and her Medical Oncology and Hematology fellowship at MSKCC. From July 2012-May 2015, she served as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at New York University and as an Attending Physician at the Langone Medical Center and at Bellevue Hospital.

Dr. Jhaveri’s primary research interests focus on the development of improved therapies for patients with breast cancer, with a focus on conducting novel clinical trials integrated with translational biomarker work. She conducts companion translational research in collaboration with her laboratory and imaging colleagues and is focused on identifying and understanding the biomarkers of response and/or resistance to novel therapies through acquired biospecimen (cfDNA and tumor) or imaging analyses. She has led the development of many targeted therapies including and not limited to PI3K/Akt inhibitors, FGFR inhibitors, ERBB2 inhibitors, oral SERD’s, Antibody-drug conjugates, amongst others.

Dr. Jhaveri has served on the ASCO Cancer Research Committee and currently serves as a member of the ASCO/TAPUR Molecular Tumor Board and as a member of the expert panel for ASCO’s guideline on use of biomarkers to guide decisions on adjuvant systemic therapy for women with early-stage invasive breast cancer. She is also a member of the Alliance Breast Committee and the Endocrine Resistance working group within the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium. Her work has been presented at annual scientific meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) and the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) and has been published widely in many reputable journals.



Panel Member
Special Session
"COVID-19 and Cancer"

Abigail Johnston
Patient Advocate
Connect Iv Legal Services, Inc.



Moderator
View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?

Stephen Johnston, MBBS, ARCP, PhD
Professor of Breast Cancer Medicine
The Royal Marsden Hospital

Stephen Johnston is Professor of Breast Cancer Medicine, Consultant Medical Oncologist and Head of The Breast Unit at the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust & Institute of Cancer Research, London. He was appointed Head of Medical Oncology at The Royal Marsden in 2019, having previously been the first Director of the UK’s National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre for Cancer at The Royal Marsden from 2006-12. He graduated in 1983 from Trinity College at The University of Cambridge, and in 1986 from The Medical School at The University of Newcastle upon Tyne. He trained in General Medicine at St Bartholomew's Hospital and Hammersmith Hospital in London, and subsequently in Medical Oncology at the Royal Marsden Hospital. He gained his PhD from the Institute of Cancer Research at the University of London, and took up his current position as Consultant Medical Oncologist on the Breast Unit at the Royal Marsden Hospital in 1997. He has a specialist interest in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, and his major research interests lie in understanding mechanisms of endocrine resistance in breast cancer. He is actively involved in facilitating the interface between basic and applied research, and has been Chief Investigator of several phase II / III trials of novel endocrine based therapeutic approaches in both advanced and early stage disease, including one of the large global adjuvant CDK 4/6 inhibitor studies in early breast cancer. He has published over 260 breast cancer related articles in peer-reviewed journals, and is a regular invited lecturer at national & international meetings. He is a member of various scientific committees and international advisory boards, has served as Faculty Member at the American Society for Clinical Oncology, Deputy-Editor of the international journal ‘Breast Cancer Research’, and is currently Trustee of the UK charity ‘Walk the Walk’



Chair
Spotlight Session 10
"Novel Immunotherapy Approaches"

Kevin Kalinsky, MD
Director
Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University

Kevin Kalinsky is the director of the Glenn Family Breast Center at Winship. A breast cancer physician and investigator, Dr. Kalinsky's research focus is developing new therapeutic approaches to patients with breast cancer. His work involves the development of clinical trials to assessing novel therapeutic agents in breast cancer based on tumor genomics.



Co-Moderator
Special Session
"Trust in Science and Healthcare"

Maimah Karmo
President/CEO
Tigerlily Foundation

Maimah Karmo is the Founder/CEO of the Tigerlily Foundation (Tigerlily) and a fourteen-year survivor of breast cancer.   On February 28, 2006, at 4:45 p.m., Maimah was diagnosed with Stage 2 breast cancer. She had no family history and was 32-years old.  While undergoing her second round of chemotherapy, she made a promise to God that if she survived, she would create an organization to educate, empower, advocate for and support young women affected by breast cancer.  After her second treatment, Tigerlily Foundation was born.  Tigerlily provides breast health, educational, empowerment wellness and transformational programs to young women; and works to end disparities of age, stage and color.

After working with Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz to develop the Breast Cancer Education and Awareness Requires Learning Young (EARLY) Act, in October 2011, Maimah was appointed to the Federal Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women, a committee established by the Affordable Care Act, on which she works to develop initiatives to increase knowledge of breast health and breast cancer, for women under the age of 45 and those at heightened risk for developing the disease.   In 2015, Maimah advocated with Members of Congress to ensure that young women had access to breast screening.  Tigerlily Foundation flew young women to Washington, D.C. to meet with 74 members of Congress.  The visit resulted in doubling the House and Senate support for the Protecting Access to Lifesaving Screening (PALS) legislation.  The bill was signed into law within a month, protecting the lives and rights of millions of women. Maimah has worked with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to launch national campaigns and has served as an Ambassador for National Women’s Health Week, an initiative of the Office of Women’s Health. 

A first generation immigrant from Liberia, who has experienced disparities first-hand, she is a leader in the women’s health field, creating and implementing national health initiatives for women and girls, with a goal of eliminating disparities of age, stage and color.  Under Maimah’s leadership, Tigerlily Foundation has launched national and global health initiatives focused on ending disparities, through its #InclusionPledge, partnering with global stakeholders, with a call to action to recognize health disparities as a social justice issue; and working to end disparities for black women in our lifetime.  She is a global health advocate, committed to justice and equity for all.  Maimah has appeared in USA Today, U.S. News and World Report, Black Enterprise, Oprah Magazine, Essence Magazine, Ladies Home Journal, Cosmopolitan,Glamour, Seventeen, Good Housekeeping, Harper’s Bazaar, Marie Claire, Redbook, Women and Cancer, Cure Magazine, Traditional Home Magazine and more. She has also been featured on Fox 5, ABC 7, CBS, the Oprah Winfrey Show, OWN, Good Morning America, the Today Show and more. She is a sought-after speaker by the media and for policy events; and she is a philanthropist.  Most dear to her heart is her 17-year old daughter, Noelle.  Noelle and Maimah dote on their Morkies, Honey and Sugar.  Maimah has published four books, and empowers people to transform through her podcast and conferences. Visit www.maimah.com to learn about her podcast, products, workshops, masterclasses, and visit www.tigerlilyfoundation to learn about how you can support young women – before, during and after breast cancer! Follow Maimah on Twitter @maimah, on Instagram @maimah and on Facebook @maimahkarmoofficial. 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Local therapy of the primary tumor"

Seema A. Khan, MD
Professor of Surgery
Northwestern University

Dr. Seema Ahsan Khan is Professor of Surgery at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University and is trained in Surgical Oncology. Her clinical practice at the Lynn Sage Comprehensive Breast Center includes the surgical therapy of women with breast cancer, and the evaluation and management of women at high risk for breast cancer. She also has an active research program in breast cancer risk assessment and prevention, and is PI of the Northwestern Cancer Prevention Consortium. This is funded by the Division of Cancer Prevention of the NCI, and conducts early-phase trials in cancer prevention at all organ sites. 

Dr. Khan’s current research is focused on the development of novel agents for breast cancer prevention, and on transdermal drug delivery to the breast through the breast skin so as to avoid or reduce the systemic effects associated with oral drug administration. She has also conducted studies on breast cancer risk biomarkers in breast tissue, and on minimally invasive techniques of obtaining breast samples for biomarker research.   



Moderator
Mini-Symposium
"The Evolution of Local Therapy in the Genomic Era"

Tari A. King, MD
Chief Division of Breast Surgery 
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Tari A. King is the Anne E. Dyson Professor of Surgery in the Field of Women's Cancers at Harvard Medical School, the chief of the Division of Breast Surgery and the associate chair of multidisciplinary oncology in the Department of Surgery at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and the chief of breast surgery at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center. She is also the director of the Breast Cancer Personalized Risk Assessment, Education and Prevention (B-PREP) Program at Brigham and Women's Hospital. Dr. King received her medical degree from University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and completed a general surgery residency at Ochsner Clinic Foundation Hospital (now Ochsner Medical Center) in New Orleans. Dr. King completed both a surgical research fellowship and a breast surgery clinical fellowship at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Her clinical and research efforts focus on tailoring local therapy and improving clinical management strategies for women at high risk of developing breast cancer. Dr. King currently serves on the Steering Committee for the TBCRC, the NCI Breast Oncology Local Disease Task Force and the Executive Council of the SSO.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Targeting EZH2 functions"

Celina G. Kleer, MD
Harold A. Oberman Collegiate Professor of Pathology
University of Michigan

Dr. Celina Kleer received her medical degree from the University of Buenos Aires School of Medicine in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 1993. She began her residency in Anatomic and Clinical Pathology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and continued her residency and surgical pathology fellowship training at the University of Michigan where she specialized in breast pathology with Dr. Harold A. Oberman, a pioneer in breast pathology. In 1999 she joined the faculty at the University of Michigan Department of Pathology. In November 2007 Dr. Kleer became the first Harold A. Oberman Collegiate Professor of Pathology at age 36, and reached the rank of full Professor with tenure in 2011. 

In conjunction with her clinical work, Dr. Kleer is the principal investigator of an NIH-funded research laboratory at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center working to understand mechanisms of breast cancer invasion and metastasis, and to develop useful breast tissue-based biomarkers. Her work bridges basic science and clinical application, having published over 150 peer-reviewed studies largely in breast cancer. 

The Kleer laboratory has pioneered studies on the function and mechanism by which EZH2, a regulator of cellular transcriptional memory and cell type identity, promotes breast cancer invasion and metastasis, and has demonstrated that EZH2 overexpression in human breast cancer samples is an independent indicator of survival. Mechanistic studies from the Kleer lab recently demonstrated that in triple negative breast cancer, EZH2 has non-canonical functions, independent of H3K27me3 activity which may have therapeutic implications. The Kleer lab has shed light into the pathobiology of metaplastic breast carcinomas, an aggressive and poorly understood form of triple negative breast cancer. Her hypothesis-driven research and pathology expertise resulted in a major breakthrough: conditional, mammary epithelial cell-specific Ccn6 knockout mice developed mammary carcinomas that closely recapitulate human metaplastic carcinomas. This research has far reaching implications, as it may enable a better understanding of the molecular determinants of this aggressive form of breast cancer, and provide a model to test new and existing treatments for metaplastic carcinomas.

Dr. Kleer is a dedicated mentor to medical students, graduate students, and physicians both in the laboratory and in surgical pathology. Celina’s easy and jovial manner overlays the resolution of a woman who recognizes the value of hard work, determination, and respect for others, and instills these values to her trainees, many of whom have been women and persons of color, or from families where the trainee may have been the first one to attend college. Because of her dedication to education, she received the 2018 Distinguished Clinical and Translational Research Mentor Award by the University of Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research, which recognizes mentors across disciplinary boundaries in pursuit of science, from across the University of Michigan.

She is a permanent member of the NIH/NCI Cancer Prevention Study Section and participates in scientific Editorial Boards including serving as Associate Editor of JCI Insight. In 2014, Dr. Kleer was inducted as an Active Member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI). In December 2019 she received the AACR Outstanding Investigator for Breast Cancer Research Award, supported by the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, which was awarded at the 2019 SABC Symposium. This year Dr. Kleer was awarded the 2020 Outstanding Investigator Award from the American Society of Investigative Pathology (ASIP).



Speaker
Educational Session
"Optimizing immunotherapy efficacy in the clinic through biomarkers: Advances in single cell and spatial histology analyse  "

Marleen Kok, MD, PhD
Medical Oncologist, Groupleader Tumor Biology & Immunology
Netherlands Cancer Institute

After finishing Medical School (2004) including an undergraduate research training on neuroblastoma genetics at the prestigious University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, USA), Marleen Kok performed her Ph.D. research from 2004-2009 at The Netherlands Cancer Institute. Working in the labs of Laura van 't Veer (currently at UCSF) and Sabine Linn (NKI, Amsterdam), she tested the predictive value of gene signatures as well as modifications of the Estrogen Receptor to predict tamoxifen resistance. This training by true experts in the field of breast cancer biomarkers forms a solid basis to pursue her career in translational breast cancer research. 

After her residency/fellowship (2009-2015) in Internal Medicine/Medical Oncology she worked as postdoctoral fellow (2015-2016) of the Dutch Cancer Society at John Hopkins University (Baltimore, USA) in the labs of Leisha Emens and Drew Pardoll. We showed that intratumoral STING (Stimulator of Interferon Genes) agonists can potently prime tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses. 

In 2016 Marleen Kok returned to the NKI to work as Medical Oncologist and translational research fellow in the lab of Ton Schumacher (2016-2018), who is world-leading in the field of T cell biology. She is the lead PI of several innovative investigator-initiated breast immunotherapy trials evaluating the efficacy of PD1-blockade with (low dose) chemotherapy and since 2019 she is Group Leader at the NKI with a focus on translational breast cancer immunology.



Chair
Spotlight Session 8
"HER2 Positive Breast Cancer"

Ian E. Krop, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Ian Elliott Krop, MD, PhD, is the Associate Chief, Division of Breast Oncology. He is also an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Krop is a translational investigator focused on the development of novel molecularly targeted therapies and immunotherapies for breast cancer, and elucidating the mechanisms of resistance to these treatments. The majority of his effort is concentrated in the area of HER2+ breast cancer. He was a leader in the development of the antibody-drug conjugate trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1).

Dr. Krop currently serves as Chief Scientific Officer for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium. He is a member of the National Cancer Institute’s Breast Cancer Steering Committee and co-chairs its Immuno-Oncology Working Group. He is also the co-vice chair for correlative science for the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology. He is a member of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Data Monitoring Committee.

Dr. Krop is a graduate of Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He trained at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He completed a medical oncology fellowship at Dana-Farber.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Clinical management of moderate penetrance genes"

Allison W. Kurian, MD, MSc
Professor of Medicine and of Epidemiology and Population Health
Stanford University School of Medicine

Dr. Kurian’s research focuses on the identification of women with elevated breast and gynecologic cancer risk, and on the development and evaluation of novel techniques for early cancer detection and risk reduction. As Director of the Stanford Women’s Clinical Cancer Genetics Program, her practice centers on women at high risk of breast and gynecologic cancers. Dr. Kurian is a leader of the Population Sciences Program at Stanford Cancer Institute and serves as Associate Division Chief for Academic Affairs in the Stanford Oncology Division.

Dr. Kurian earned her M.D. degree at Harvard Medical School, completed residency in Internal Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, then trained in Medical Oncology and earned her M.Sc. degree in Epidemiology at Stanford University. She is an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation. Dr. Kurian has published more than 200 peer-reviewed articles, many in high-impact journals such as JAMA, the Journal of Clinical Oncology and the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Kurian’s research has been supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, California Breast Cancer Research Program, Komen for the Cure Foundation, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, BRCA Foundation and others. Dr. Kurian serves on several national committees that advance the clinical and research mission of women’s cancer genetics: she develops evidence-based practice guidelines as a member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network and has led the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s Scientific Program Committee for Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention. 



Moderator
Basic Science Forum
"Targeting Nuclear Steroid Receptors"

Carol A. Lange, PhD
Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology
University of Minnesota Masonic Cancer Center

Dr. Carol Lange's research program in the areas of breast and ovarian cancer is focused on the integrated actions of growth factor- and stress-activated protein kinases and steroid hormone receptors (SRs). They have made critical contributions to the understanding of mechanisms of both ligand-induced and ligand-independent SR actions and their role in tumor progression towards therapy resistance and metastasis. Estrogen receptor α (ER) and progesterone receptors (PRs) are context-dependent transcription factor partners, essential for development of the breast and reproductive tract. Altered sex hormone levels contribute to cancer risk in these tissues and drive early tumor progression. The presence of abnormally activated ERs and imbalanced/activated PR isoforms in tumors can dramatically influence responses to endocrine or other therapies. Like PRs, functionally redundant and inducible glucocorticoid receptors (GR) are emerging as important drivers of advanced cancer biology, including metabolic plasticity, stemness properties, and metastasis. All SRs can rapidly activate cytoplasmic protein kinases and act as “growth factor sensors”. In this role, SRs are heavily phosphorylated by mitogenic protein kinases (MAPKs, AKT, CDKs) that are frequently elevated and activated in breast and other cancers. Phosphorylation of SRs alters their binding partners (co-activators, pioneer factors) and promoter selection and influences cancer cell fate/plasticity by regulating genes that specify proliferative, pro-survival, metabolic, inflammatory, and stem cell programs via expression of autocrine and paracrine factors. A deeper understanding of SR/growth factor interplay will provide new biomarkers and enable improved SR targeting, modernizing endocrine therapies to halt cancer progression, prevent recurrence, and increase patient survival.

As a research advisor and T32-supported Training Program Director, she is committed to providing high quality training and mentoring in a supportive environment that fosters creativity and embraces diversity. Over the past 22 years as an independent investigator, she has mentored trainees at all levels, including as primary advisor to 12 predoctoral and 12 postdoctoral trainees, and has served as faculty mentor to numerous junior faculty members in her leadership roles within the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) Internal Advisory Board and the University of Minnesota Masonic Cancer Center (MCC), where she serves as the Director of the Targets of Cancer Training Program (NIH/NCI T32) and co-lead of the Cellular Mechanisms of Cancer Program. Dr. Lange has a long-standing interest in professional career and leadership development and has routinely organized and participated in events designed for supporting young people who are pursuing basic and translational research careers both locally and nationally, and through her career-long affiliation with The Endocrine Society. 



Discussant
Spotlight Session 4
"Brain Metastases: Managing LMD / Targeting HER2"

Eudocia Q. Lee, MD, MPH
Director of Clinical Research
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Eudocia Q. Lee is a neurology trained neuro-oncologist at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Her clinical interests and expertise revolve around the development of novel therapies for CNS tumors including gliomas and metastases. She is overall PI of several ongoing multi-center clinical trials of targeted agents in patients with GBM and has served as site PI of several ongoing brain metastases and leptomeningeal metastases clinical trials. In addition, she leads a collaborative effort between Radiographic Assessment in Neuro-Oncology, the Society for Neuro-Oncology, clinical trial cooperative groups, patient advocacy groups, and community members to increase accrual to brain tumor clinical trials. She is co-leader of the brain metastases working group within Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO), an international collaborative effort to develop guidelines and radiographic response criteria for metastatic brain tumor trials. These response criteria have now been widely adopted within the brain metastasis community. Given this expertise, she was selected as co-chair of the first inaugural Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO) Brain Metastases Symposium in 2019. 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Imaging/AI"

Connie Lehman, MD, PhD
Professor of Radiology, Chief of Breast Imaging
Harvard Medical School/Mass General Brigham

Constance “Connie” Lehman is Professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School, Chief of Breast Imaging, and Co-Director of the Avon Comprehensive Breast Evaluation Center at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. She received her undergraduate education at Duke University, MD and PhD from Yale University and holds an honorary medical degree from Harvard Medical School. She has co-authored or authored national and international breast cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment recommendations by the American Cancer Society, the American College of Radiology, and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and over 250 peer-reviewed scientific publications. Her current research has demonstrated the power of AI tools to exceed current methods to predict future breast cancer risk and to interpret mammograms.  She has led several programs to improve breast cancer detection and diagnosis in global communities with limited resources.  With this continued work, the goal of autonomous imaging interpretation of a large subset of imaging studies will be realized, allowing expansion of the power of the imaging sciences to diagnose earlier, more accurately, and at lower cost a wide range of disease states. Collectively, her experiences support methods to guide effective, safe, timely, cost effective and quality implementation of AI tools to improve patient outcomes.  



Speaker
Clinical Science Forum
"Oligometastatic disease: Definitions and practice patterns"

Yolande Lievens, MD, PhD
Professor
UZ Gent
Ghent, Belgium



Speaker
Basic Workshop
"Meeting the bar: How to tell when basic science discoveries are ready to translate"

Bora Lim, MD
Associate Professor
Baylor College of Medicine

As an associate professor of breast oncology and a director of translational research, breast research program at Baylor college of Medicine, I have extensive experience with biospecimen analysis, pre-clinical studies and drug discovery work. My own research interests focus on the discovery of novel therapeutic strategies for breast cancers like triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and inflammatory breast cancer (IBC), as well as potential new biomarkers and agent delivery methods for these cancer types. My expertise in translational research along with clinical trial-based practice provides me key insights to identify a right project that can improve the outcome of patients suffering from advanced breast cancer. 



Discussant
General Session 3

Minetta C. Liu, MD
Professor and Research Chair of Oncology
Mayo Clinic

Minetta C. Liu, M.D., conducts patient-oriented research focused on two major areas: The development of clinically relevant molecular markers to allow for the most accurate prediction of treatment benefit and patient outcomes in solid tumor malignancies, and the development of novel therapeutics to improve survival in early-stage and metastatic breast cancer.

Dr. Liu leads a collaborative effort to optimize and validate platforms for isolating and analyzing circulating tumor cells (CTCs), cell-free DNA (cfDNA), and other blood components. Although her clinical expertise is in breast cancer, her "liquid biopsy" efforts are not restricted to any particular malignancy. Dr. Liu's current work includes the characterization of breast cancer stem cells in the peripheral circulation and the development of assays for the reliable detection of BRAF, EGFR, KRAS and ESR1 mutations to assist in treatment selection and disease monitoring in melanoma, lung cancer, colorectal cancer and breast cancer, respectively.

Dr. Liu also leads several collaborative multi-institutional clinical trials through such mechanisms as the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology and the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium. The investigational agents explored in these studies have the potential to improve outcomes in all settings of breast cancer for hormone receptor positive breast cancer, HER2-positive breast cancer, and hormone receptor negative breast cancer and HER2-negative breast cancer. This includes a series of phase I trials with oncolytic measles virotherapy as part of the Mayo Clinic Specialized Program of Research Excellence in breast cancer.



Speaker
Educational Session
"IO vs Capecitabine for TNBC"

Sherene Loi, MBBS (Hons), FRACP, PhD, FAHMS, GAICD
Medical Oncologist
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre

Sherene Loi is a Medical Oncologist specialized in breast cancer treatment as well as clinician scientist with expertise in genomics, immunology and drug development. Her work is focused on developing new therapeutic approaches that may improve outcomes of breast cancer patients.

After completing Medical Oncology specialist clinical training in 2003 she undertook a PhD and postdoctoral studies at the Institut Jules Bordet in Brussels, Belgium (2003-2012). In 2013, she returned to head the newly created Translational Breast Cancer Genomics and Therapeutics laboratory at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, as well as Consultant Medical Oncologist in the Breast Service and head of the Breast Cancer Clinical Trials Unit.

She is recognised internationally as a leading clinician scientist whose work has led to new insights into the immunology field in breast cancer. As a result of her research, she leads a number of international breast cancer clinical trials in immunotherapy.

Over her career to date she has published 150 peer-reviewed research articles with a lifetime H index of 46. Her recent work has been highly influential with 14,651 total citations and 10,532 (72%) within the past 5 years (Google Scholar). She is on the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Australia New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group (BCT Australia/NZ), which is the largest breast cancer clinical trials cooperative group in Australia and also co-chairs the Translational Working Group of the International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) based in Bern, Switzerland which conducts academic global breast cancer clinical trials in over 16 countries world-wide. Prof. Loi is the current holder of the inaugural National Breast Cancer Foundation of Australia Endowed Chair. She is a research fellow of the Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF), New York and is on the Scientific Committee for Breast Cancer for the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)



Presenter - Con
Debate
"RxPONDER: Was it all OF S?"

Sibylle Loibl, MD, PhD
Chair
GBG Forschungs GmbH

Prof. Dr. Sibylle Loibl is Chief Executive Officer of the GBG Forschungs GmbH and Chair of the German Breast Group(study group).

Prof. Dr. Loibl has gained international recognition for her research into neoadjuvant breast cancer therapy, breast cancer during pregnancy and breast cancer in young women. She was responsible for establishing the Translational Research Department within the German Breast Group and has headed numerous research projects. In addition, Prof. Dr. Loibl has been involved in conducting and managing a significant number of national and international clinical trials. In 2014, she was appointed to the Executive Board of the Breast International Group (BIG) and also sits on several international steering committees, translational research committees and independent data monitoring committees.

Prof. Dr. Loibl is an associate professor at the Goethe University of Frankfurt. She gained a doctorate at the Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg and trained as a consultant in gynaecology and obstetrics at the women’s clinics of the university hospitals in Heidelberg and Frankfurt am Main. She devotes most of her time to clinical research within the German Breast Group and clinical work at the Centrum für Hämatologie und Onkologie Bethanien, Frankfurt.

Prof. Dr. Loibl is author of more than 350 original and peer review articles and co-author of more than 550 scientific papers; she has also written numerous books and book contributions. She is an active member of many important national and international organisations, such as ASCO, ESMO, DKG and the AGO Kommission Mamma and S3 Letilinien kommission to develop the breast cancer guidelines.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Special indications where local therapy should be considered"

Anthony Lucci, MD
Professor of Surgery
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Lucci is a Professor of Surgery in The Department of Breast Surgical Oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. He will be presenting in the session entitled "Local Therapy of the Primary and Beyond in Patients with Advanced Disease”. Dr. Lucci will discuss special indications where local therapy can be considered, including subtypes of breast cancer patients with advanced / metastatic disease who may benefit from local therapy. 

Dr. Lucci has extensive experience in the management of patients with advanced breast cancer. He serves as the Surgical Core Leader for the MD Anderson Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic and Research Program, and consults with approximately 100 patients each year with inflammatory/advanced breast cancers.  Dr. Lucci has also published extensively on the management of patients with inflammatory breast cancer, including outcomes related to removal of the primary tumor in patients with stage IV disease. He has been a frequent invited speaker on breast cancer management both nationally and internationally, and is excited to participate in this activity at the 2021 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 5
" Life after breast cancer: Cardiac health, fertility preservation, and returning to life"

Maryam Lustberg, MD, MPH
Director Breast Program
Yale University School of Medicine

Maryam Lustberg, MD, MPH, is Director of The Breast Center at Smilow Cancer Hospital and Chief of Breast Medical Oncology at Yale Cancer Center. She is also an Associate Professor of Medicine (Medical Oncology). She has been recognized for her patient-focused care with awards that include being rated by Forbes as one of the top breast medical oncologists in the nation and named to the Castle Connolly list of “Regional Top Doctors,” and “Exceptional Women in Medicine” for 2020. She is currently participating in the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Leadership Development Program.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 1
"Endocrine Resistance: Novel mechanisms and emerging new therapies"

Luca Magnani, PhD
Chair in Cancer Adaptation and Evolution
Imperial College London

Dr. Luca Magnani conducted his post-doctoral training at the Geisel Medical School, Dartmouth College and at the University of Toronto. He opened his lab in 2013 at Imperial College London with a focus on breast cancer and epigenetics. He was promoted to Full professor in 2020. Dr. Magnani has lectured in over 50 institutes and Universities and consistently presents his work at major international conferences. He has received over 2.5 million pounds in funding, received the prestigious CRUK Career Development Fellowship and won several award for his scientific achievements. 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Single cell analysis of circulating tumor cells"

Shyamala Maheswaran, PhD
Professor
Massachusetts General Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Dr. Shyamala Maheswaran is a world-renowned expert in cancer metastasis and studies this phenomenon specifically by examining cellular plasticity and cell states. She serves as the Scientific Director, Center for CTC Innovation at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center. She has been awarded multiple patents for her innovative work and is one of the Founders of the biotech company, TellBio, Inc. Dr. Maheswaran has published several high-profile papers on cancer metastases and has been invited to present her work at several national and international meetings. Born in Sri Lanka, she received her Ph.D. at Boston University, followed by postdoctoral studies at MGH. She joined the Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School faculty as Assistant Professor of Surgery and is currently a full Professor. She has received multiple awards for her work including the MGH Clinical Research Team Award (2008), AACR Team Science Award (2010), Douglass Family Foundation Prize for Excellence in Oncology Research (2016), MGH Martin Prize for Basic Research(2015) and the Outstanding Scientist Award, American Association of Indian Scientists in Cancer Research (AAISCR) (2018). 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Refining axillary management after neoadjuvant chemotherapy - what does the evidence support"

Eleftherios Mamounas, MD, MPH
Medical Director, Comprehensive Breast Program
Orlando Health Cancer Institute

Terry Mamounas, MD, MPH, FACS, received his medical degree from the University of Athens Medical School in Athens, Greece, in 1983 and a Masters of Public Health from the University of Pittsburgh in 1989. He completed his general surgery residency at McKeesport Hospital in Pennsylvania.He then completed a clinical oncology research fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh and a surgical oncology fellowship at the Department of Surgical Oncology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute in New York. He is currently the Medical Director or the Comprehensive Breast Program.

Dr. Mamounas has authored and coauthored more than 300 abstracts, peer-reviewed manuscripts and book chapters and has given numerous lectures at national and international meetings. As part of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project, his clinical research has been funded over the past 20 years by several National Cancer Institute grants and more recently by a Komen for the Cure grant.He has served on the editorial boards of several oncology journals and is a past associate editor of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. He has received several awards and distinctions and has been listed in The Best Doctors in America consistently since 2001. He is considered one of the nation's best cancer physicians.

Dr. Mamounas holds memberships in several professional societies, including the American College of Surgeons, the Society of Surgical Oncology and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.



Panel Member
Molecular Tumor Board

Diana Mandelker MD, PhD
Director for Germline Genetics
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Mandelker is the Director for Germline Genetics at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and a board certified Molecular Pathologist. Prior to joining the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center faculty in 2015, she completed her undergraduate studies at Yale University, her MD/PhD training at The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and her residency and fellowship training at Harvard Medical School.  Her clinical practice focuses on hereditary cancer susceptibility testing and her research interests involve the interplay of germline and somatic genetics.



Panel Member
Special Session
"Trust in Science and Healthcare"

Maria Elena Martinez, PhD
Associate Director
UC San Diego

Elena Martinez, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, having joined the UC San Diego faculty in 2012. She holds the Sam M. Walton Endowed Chair for Cancer Research and Co-leads the Community Outreach & Engagement core at the Moores Cancer Center. Dr. Martinez holds a PhD in Epidemiology and a Master's in Public Health. Dr. Martinez's research interests in colorectal cancer prevention began during the conduct of her doctoral dissertation and extended into her post-doctoral studies at the Harvard School of Public Health. Prior to joining the UC San Diego faculty, she was Professor of Epidemiology in the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health and was the Richard H. Hollen Professor of Cancer Prevention at the Arizona Cancer Center. She had a very active research portfolio at the University of Arizona, including RO1 funding and program leadership in a Program Project (PO1) and a Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) program. She has published extensively in areas of epidemiology, molecular epidemiology, and cancer prevention. Her research currently focuses on breast cancer in Hispanic women, with a prominent leadership role in the Ella Binational Breast Cancer Study. She is currently co-PI of an NCI-funded UO1 grant assessing epidemiologic and epigenetic features of breast tumors occurring in the post-partum period in Hispanic women. In addition, she is a key member of the original investigative team that implemented a large Gates Foundation-funded consortium in six countries in Latin America focusing on Helicobacter pylori eradication and gastric cancer prevention. Nationally, she has established herself as a strong leader in the area of cancer health disparities; evidence of this is her appointment as recent chair of the American Association for Cancer Research Minorities in Cancer Research Council. In addition, she is senior editor of the Cancer Disparities section for the Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention journal. Dr. Martinez was a recipient of the 2013 Women Who Mean Business Award from the San Diego Business Journal. Dr. Martinez has served on the NCI's Board of Scientific Counselors and currently she is a member of the NCI's Board of Scientific Advisors. Dr. Martinez is a member of prestigious Blue Ribbon Panel of experts that informed the scientific direction and goals of Vice President Joe Biden's National Cancer Moonshot Initiative.



Panel Member
Educational Session
"Local Therapy of the Primary and Beyond in Patients with Advanced Disease"

Ginny Mason, RN, BSN
Executive Director
Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Foundation

Following her diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer in 1994, Ginny Mason began getting involved in breast cancer advocacy through grant review of public speaking. She has been volunteering with the Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Foundation since its start in 1999, which has further shaped her role in advocacy. Her background in nursing has been helpful as she has become more involved in research advocacy and has taken advantage of educational programming such as Project LEAD, AACR Scientist Survivor, and other opportunities. From 2007-2011 she served as the Consumer Representative on the Oncology Drugs Advisory Committee for the FDA and has continued to serve on FDA committees in various capacities on an ad hoc basis.

As Executive Director of the Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Foundation, since 2003, she has taken responsibility as PI for our BioBank as well as a Patient Registry for inflammatory breast cancer. Ms. Mason serves as the organization liasion with researchers and works with their Medical Advisory Board on website content and when they have adequate funds for offering research grants. She has served on Boards with the Avon Foundation, Young Survival Coalition, and National Breast Cancer Coaltion and has worked on grant review for the DoD, California Breast Cancer Research Program, Komen Tissue Bank at IU, Florida Breast Cancer Foundation and others.

Over the years Ms. Mason provided advocate input for pharmaceutical companies on educational materials, clinical trial materials and patient feedbackand has made a life-time practice of not accepting payment for these services. In recent years she had the opportunity to move into global breast cancer advocacy work through the ABC Global Alliance and this year she is serving on the Advocacy Planning committee for ABC-6 Consensus Conference and will co-chair a session as well as serve on the consensus panel. She has also worked on two global projects funded by Novartis.

Ginny Mason is a long-time member of AACR, ASCO, ONS and her organization is a member of the Metastatic Breast Cancer Alliance. Over the years she served on various ASCO committees and currently serves on the TAPUR molecular tumor board as a patient representative. In 2020 she began her 2nd term on the Breast Committee of SWOG Cancer Research Network where she also serves on the Digital Engagement Committee and also represents Indiana University Simon Cancer Center on TBCRC (Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium)



Speaker
Educational Session
"CDK4/6 for ER+"

Ingrid A. Mayer, MD, MSCI
Professor of Medicine, Ingram Professor of Cancer Research
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Dr. Mayer is a Professor of Medicine and Ingram Professor of Cancer Research, and a breast medical oncologist by training. She is currently the co-Leader of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC)/ Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) Breast Cancer Program and co-PI of the VICC Breast Cancer NCI Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE). She obtained her medical degree from the Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil in 1993. Thereafter, she came to the United States for her post-graduate training (internship, residency, chief-residency and Hematology/ Oncology fellowship) at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), between 1994 and 2001. In 2003, Dr. Mayer was recruited to VUMC/ VICC, and successfully completed a Master of Science in Clinical Investigation (MSCI) Program at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in 2006.

Since then, her research endeavors and grant funding from the NCI (K23, Breast Cancer SPORE), Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF), SU2C Catalyst grant, ASPIRE grant and a Susan G. Komen Leadership grant have been focused on 1) identification of targetable pathways addressing endocrine therapy resistance in ER+ breast cancers, particularly the PI3K and FGFR pathways, 2) novel immunotherapy strategies in HER2-negative breast cancers, 3) chemotherapy resistance in triple negative breast cancers, and 4) biomarker prediction of treatment response in HER2-negative breast cancers. She has been a Principal Investigator on more than 90 breast cancer clinical trials, spanning from phase I through phase III trials. In view of her clinical trial experience, Dr. Mayer was appointed Chair of the VICC Data Safety and Monitoring Committee (DSMC) in 2010. She became a Komen Scholar in 2018.  Nationally, aside from being an active member of the ECOG-ACRIN Breast Core Committee and the VICC representative of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Breast Cancer Panel of Experts, Dr. Mayer has been highly involved with the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC), and is currently part of its Steering Committee. 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Immune therapy in the (neo) adjuvant setting"

Heather McArthur, MD, MPH
Director, Breast Oncology
UT Southwestern

Heather McArthur, MD, MPH is Medical Director of Breast Oncology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center (CSMC). Dr. McArthur is a medical oncologist with a clinical practice dedicated to the care of patients with breast cancer. Her research activities are focused on innovations in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, with a particular interest in novel immune therapy strategies. For example, she is currently evaluating the impact of tumor destruction with freezing (cryoablation) or radiation in combination with immune stimulation for the treatment of women with early stage breast cancer. It is hoped that by augmenting one's immune response to the unique biologic features of one's tumor, that an affected individual may develop long-term immunity against their tumor, and thus, be cured.

Dr. McArthur completed formal medical oncology training in Canada where she was awarded a highly competitive grant that funded an advanced fellowship at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York. Thereafter, she joined MSKCC as faculty where she developed the institutional breast cancer immunotherapy program before joining CSMC in 2016. She has a Master’s in Public Health with a focus on clinical trial design from Harvard University and has mentored many medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty in the conduct and reporting of several studies - two of which directly informed National Comprehensive Cancer Network treatment guidelines.

Dr. McArthur has held several leadership positions in the field including Co-Chair of a Breast International Group Immunotherapy Taskforce, member of a National Cancer Institute (NCI) Breast Cancer Immuno-Oncology (IO) Working Group, member of a NCI Breast Cancer IO Task Force, and member of an Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology IO Committee. She has served the Amercian Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) on the Annual Meeting IO Scientific Committee, the YIA/CDA Grant Selection Committee, the Breast Cancer Symposium Program Committee, the Annual Meeting Grant Writing Workshop, a Guideline Expert Panel, and Educational Book Expert Panels. She has participated in the ASCO Leadership Development Program; reviewed manuscripts for various high impact journals; authored numerous articles; and served on many study steering committees. She has designed, conducted, and reported on many studies in breast cancer and is currently the co-PI for a large, randomized, international phase 3 study exploring adjuvant chemotherapy with or without immune therapy for the treatment of triple negative breast cancer (IMpassion030).



Speaker
Translational Science Forum
"Next generation sequencing in ER targets"

Donald P. McDonnell, PhD
Professor, Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology
Duke University School of Medicine

Dr. Donald McDonnell is the Glaxo-Wellcome Professor of Molecular Cancer Biology in the Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke University School of Medicine. In addition, he serves as Associate Director of Translational Research within the Duke Cancer Institute. His research focuses on the development and application of mechanism-based approaches to identify novel therapeutics for use in the treatment and prevention of hormonally responsive cancers. Specifically, he is engaged in the pharmaceutical exploitation of the estrogen and androgen receptors as therapeutic targets in breast and prostate cancers and in defining how these receptors influence the pathogenesis of these diseases. From his work has emerged several drugs that are at various stages of clinical development. He received his PhD from Baylor College of Medicine, and his BSc in Biochemistry at the National University of Ireland, Galway. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the National Academy of Inventors and is also a Komen Scholar.



Moderator
Educational Session
"Targeting the "Un-druggable"

Funda Meric-Bernstam, MD
Chair, Investigational Cancer Therapeutics
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center 

Funda Meric-Bernstam is the Chair of the Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics (the Phase I Program at MD Anderson Cancer Center, MDACC), Medical Director of the MDACC Institute for Personalized Cancer Therapy. She is a physician-scientist within basic and translational research programs focused on cell signaling, biomarker discovery and molecular therapeutics with specific focus on FGFR signaling and patient derived models. Dr. Meric-Bernstam has extensive experience with high throughput genomic and proteomic technologies, as well as correlative studies from clinical trials and lead a large institutional effort on genomic profiling for clinical trial allocation and biomarker discovery. She is a co-leader in the Cancer Center Support grant funded Developmental Therapeutics program and co-PI on the Patient-Derived Xenograft consortium grant and PI of the Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network grant.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Optimizing the management of early stage TNBC"

Elizabeth A. Mittendorf, MD, PhD
Professor of Surgery
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Dr. Mittendorf is a Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School as well as the Associate Chair for Research in the Department of Surgery at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and co-leader of the Breast Cancer Program for  the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. Dr. Mittendorf received her medical degree from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine where she completed General Surgery. Training. After serving in the United States military she completed a Surgical Oncology fellowship at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Mittendorf also holds a PhD in Immunology from the University of Texas. Dr. Mittendorf focuses her clinical and laboratory efforts on the study of breast cancer with a specific interest in immunotherapy. She has been the Pl on a number of clinical protocols informed by work from her laboratory including a multicenter trial investigating the a CD8+ T cell eliciting vaccine in combination with trastuzumab and more recently the lmpassion031 trial that showed the benefit of immunotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting for triple negative breast cancer patients. The current focus of her laboratory work is to determine the impact of standard  and experimental therapies on immunologic aspects of the tumor microenvironment to inform rational trials of immunotherapeutic agents. In addition to her work evaluating breast tumor immunology and immunotherapy, Dr. Mittendorf has published extensively on a multitude of subjects related to breast cancer and surgical management of the disease to include incorporation.



Speaker
Special Session
"Regulatory Insights to the 2021 Early Stage Breast Cancer Approval"

Alberto J. Montero, MD, MBA
Clinical Director
University Hospitals
Seidman Cancer Center

Alberto Montero, MD, MBA, is clinical director of the Breast Cancer Medical Oncology Program at University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and professor of medicine at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. He is board certified in medical oncology by the American Board of Internal Medicine.   Dr. Montero has been in academic practice for over 13 years and has demonstrated a strong track record of clinical research in breast cancer. Prior to joining the UH Seidman Cancer Center team, Dr. Montero spent seven years at the Cleveland Clinic, where he served as a staff physician in the hematology and oncology department, as well as chief quality improvement officer and patient experience officer.  Dr. Montero graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree at University of Texas at Austin and earned his medical degree from University of Texas, Galveston. He also earned his MBA at University of Miami School of Business. He completed his internal medicine residency training at University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and his hematology-oncology fellowship at University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

Dr. Montero is very active in breast cancer research and has served as Principal Investigator in numerous clinical trials. He has over 100 peer-reviewed publications. He has served on numerous committees and editorial boards, including serving as associate editor for Breast Cancer Research & Treatment, and recently has served as a reviewer and study chair for the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP). He is a member of several professional societies, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology and American Association of Cancer Research.



Panel Member
View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?

Meena S. Moran, MD
Professor and Chief of Breast Radiation Therapy Service
Yale School of Medicine

Dr. Meena S. Moran attended Cornell Medical College and did her internal medicine internship at Columbia University Hospital in New York City, followed by her residency training in radiation oncology at Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, CT. Board certified by the American Board of Radiology (ABR) in radiation oncology, she is Professor of Therapeutic Radiology at Yale School of Medicine, and Chief of the Yale Radiation Breast Program. She has published numerous peer reviewed papers and chapters related to radiation therapy and local control, standardizing breast cancer care, predictors of local-regional relapse and radiation techniques.   She has worked on editorial boards including Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO); International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics; Breast Journal; Breast Diseases: A Year Book Quarterly and most recently, Breast Cancer Research & Treatment. She has a special interest in development of standards and guidelines for breast cancer care. As one of the founding board members of the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) through the American College of Surgeons, she served 6 years during the initial development of the standards, guidelines and surveying process for the program.  She has also served on the American College of Radiology (ACR) Breast Expert Panel, and was lead author for the Appropriateness Criteria for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (ACR).  She has co-chaired the Society Surgical Oncology (SSO)/ASTRO Margins Guidelines after breast conserving surgery for invasive cancers and DCIS. She has held several prominent positions including co-Chair of ASCO Breast Annual Symposium 2014 (1 year term), Chair of ASTRO’s Annual Meeting Breast Scientific Committee (3 years), and Chair of the Early-Stage Breast Educational Committee at ASTRO’s Annual Meeting (5 years). Currently, she continues on the Breast Panel for the ABR where she has developed written, oral, and MOC boards questions, and continues to serve as a breast oral boards examiner. She is also the current Vice Chair of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Breast Panel.



Speaker
Mini-Symposium
"Is less (or more) axillary surgery needed in the genomic era?"

Monica Morrow, MD
Chief Breast Surgical Service 
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Monica Morrow is Chief of the Breast Service and the Anne Burnett Windfohr Chair of Clinical Oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Professor of Surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College.  

She has published over 600 peer reviewed papers, book chapters, and editorials on issues in local management of breast cancer.  Awards include Gianni Bonnadonna Breast Cancer Award (ASCO 2012), William McGuire Lectureship (SABCS 2013), Susan G. Komen Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction in Clinical Research (SABCS 2016), St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Award (2019), and the John Wayne Clinical Research Award  (SSO 2019). 

Dr. Morrow is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons (Glasgow) and the Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland, and a past President of the Society of Surgical Oncology.  She has led national committees to develop standards for breast conserving surgery and guidelines for margins in DCIS and invasive cancer.   



Discussant
Spotlight Session 11
"The future is Now: Innovation in Pathology and Radiology"

Linda Moy, MD
Professor of Radiology
NYU Langone Perlmutter Cancer Center 

Dr Linda Moy is professor of radiology at NYU. She is the senior deputy editor for the flagship journal of her specialty, Radiology. She also serves as deputy editor of Breast Imaging for Radiology. Her research focuses on diagnostic oncologic imaging, with an emphasis on breast cancer. She is an NIH-funded investigator with applications in multiparametric breast MRI and artificial intelligence. She collaborates with the NYU Center for Data Science to investigate deep learning tools for multitask learning across modalities.



Speaker
Basic Workshop
"Tricking T cells into action: Using patient-derived organoids to identify and expand tumor-specific T cells"

Senthil K. Muthuswamy, PhD
Director of Cell Biology
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Harvard Medical School

Senthil K. Muthuswamy, Ph.D., is the Director of the Cell Biology Program at the Cancer Centre at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre, Harvard Medical School. Dr. Muthuswamy received his Ph.D. from McMaster University, Canada, and did his postdoctoral fellowship with Joan Brugge at Harvard Medical School. He began his independent faculty position at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York, and subsequently moved to Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto. In 2015 he moved to Department of Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and the Harvard Cancer Center. Dr. Muthuswamy was among the first to employ three-dimensional cell culture (referred to as organoids) to bridge the gap between growing cells as a flat monolayer and tumors growing in vivo. His laboratory develops and uses organoid models to understand how cell polarity proteins regulate cancer initiation, progression, and therapy resistance. Ongoing work in his group involves using organoids for understanding cancer initiation, therapy resistance, biomarker discovery, and T cell–tumor cell interactions. In addition, his group works closely with clinical teams to investigate the utility of patient-derived tumor organoids for the personalization of treatment for cancer patients.   

Dr. Muthuswamy is a recipient of the Rita Allen Scholar award, V Foundation scholar award, US Army Era of Hope Scholar Award, Lee K. and Margaret Lau Chair in Breast Cancer Research, and the Canadian Society of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology young scientist award for research achievements



Moderator
Educational Session
"Triple Negative Breast Cancer: Critical Update on Biology and Management"

Rita Nanda, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
The University of Chicago

Rita Nanda, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Director of Breast Oncology at The University of Chicago. Dr. Nanda earned her undergraduate degree in Chemical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and her Medical Degree from The University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine. She subsequently completed her Residency in Internal Medicine and her Fellowship in Hematology/Oncology at The University of Chicago. 

Dr. Nanda’s research interests include identifying novel treatments for the management of breast cancer, particularly triple-negative disease. Dr. Nanda has authored numerous scientific publications and book chapters, including one of the first reports of immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy for triple-negative breast cancer. She is a member of the Breast Immuno-Oncology (BIO) Taskforce of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Breast Cancer Steering Committee (BCSC), and serves as a Principal Investigator for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) and the ISPY2 Clinical Trial Network. 

She is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Association of Cancer Research, and the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer.

Dr. Nanda’s research has been funded by The NIH, The Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, The Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, The Susan G. Komen Foundation, The Metastatic Breast Cancer Network, and the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. She was awarded the 2014 NCI Cancer Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Award, and currently serves as the co-PI for the University of Chicago Interdisciplinary Cancer Health Disparities SPORE.



Speaker
Clinical Research Workshop
"How to design an efficient clinical study"

Valentina Nekljudova, PhD
Head Statistician
German Breast Group

Valentina Nekljudova is an expirienced biostatistician working for more than 15 years on breast cancer clinical trials and translational research projects at GBG; since 2012 leading the statistical team at GBG. As the head statistician of GBG, she is responsible for educating and consulting clinicians in statistical methods, including giving workshops at the GBG yearly meetings, as well as at GBG subboard meetings (e.g. on sample size, adaptive designs, Bayesian methods, and non-inferiority trials). Dr. Nekljudova is closely involved in the preparation of presentations for international congresses and publications and is a statistical reviewer for The Lancet Oncology.Member of the EBCTCG steering committee.



Discussant
General Session 4

Lisa Newman, MD, MPH, FACS, FASCO
Chief, Section of Breast Surgery
Weill Cornell Medicine

Dr. Newman is a surgical oncologist with a practice dedicated to breast cancer management. In August 2018 she was appointed to oversee the breast program for the Weill Cornell Medicine-NewYork Presbyterian Hospital Network, serving its Manhattan, Queens and Brooklyn sites. Previously, she worked at the Henry Ford Health System, where she served as breast program director, covering multiple hospitals throughout Michigan since 2015. She is also the Founding Medical Director for the International Center for the Study of Breast Cancer Subtypes, currently headquartered at Weill Cornell Medicine. Dr. Newman was Professor of Surgery  and Director of the Breast Care Center for the University  of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where she also served as Program Director for the Breast Fellowship from 2002 to 2015. Dr. Newman holds a Masters Degree in Public Health from Harvard University, and she also obtained her undergraduate education at Harvard. She attended medical school and completed her general surgery residency training at the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn. Dr. Newman remained at Downstate following completion of her postgraduate training, and served as an Assistant Professor of Surgery  with this program for several years. She pursued fellowship training in surgical oncology at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center 1997-99, followed by joining the faculty as an Assistant Professor; she continues to hold an Adjunct Professorship with M.D. Anderson.



Speaker
Mini-Symposium
"Genomics of DNA repair defects in breast cancer"

Serena Nik-Zainal, PhD
CRUK Advanced Clinician Scientist
University of Cambridge

Following a first-class degree in preclinical science, Prof. Nik-Zainal obtained a medical degree from the University of Cambridge in December 2000, sponsored by Petroliam Nasional Berhad Malaysia (PETRONAS) and as a Fellow of the Cambridge Commonwealth Trust. She trained in general internal medicine before specializing in Clinical Genetics. She obtained the Certificate of Specialist Training in Clinical Genetics in January 2013 and have been an Honorary Consultant in Clinical Genetics at Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust since February 2013. She recruited patients with DNA repair defects as part of the Insignia project until December 2018.

Prof. Nik-Zainal undertook a PhD at Wellcome Sanger Institute (WSI) exploring cancer using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology in 2009. She was heavily involved in development of the whole genome sequencing (WGS) somatic variation pipeline and the development of an array of analytical principles that revealed the underlying abnormal biology of tumors – including generalized mutational signatures, imprints left by mutagenic processes that have occurred through cancer development, a novel phenomenon of localized hypermutation termed “kataegis”, and developed the principles of constructing a cancer evolutionary tree from a single tumour sample.

In a post-doctoral role and as an early investigator, Prof. Nik-Zainal continued to explore large cancer datasets, leading production and analyses of the largest cohort of WGS cancers of a single tissue-type, of 560 breast cancers. She began pursuing experimental validation of mutational signatures, dissecting mechanisms of mutagenesis using cellular models. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) were used to generate CRISPR-Cas9 knockouts of DNA repair genes and were systematically treated with a variety of environmental mutagens. The results from these endeavors will serve as a reference resource of validated human mutational signatures. 

As a Group Leader at the University of Cambridge, my team has continued to advance the field of mutational signatures through a combination of computational and experimental approaches, to ultimately create clinical applications. With five patent filings made in the last 36 months, we are unravelling mechanisms underpinning mutagenesis, developing machine-learning based clinical algorithms, and are actively connecting with clinical trials to validate our algorithmic tools, to better inform patient stratification for therapeutic intervention.



Discussant
General Session 3

Ciara O'Sullivan, MB Bch BAO
Consultant, Assistant Professor of Medical Oncology
Mayo Clinic

Dr. O'Sullivan is an Assistant Professor of Medical Oncology focusing on clinical and translational research in breast cancer, currently employed at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester MN. She is a prior recipient of a San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium Clinical Scholars Scholarship (2013) Award, an American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Merit Award (2014), and an ASCO Career Development Award (2018). She is currently chair of an FDA registration trial, CompassHER2 RD (CompassHER2 Trials Examining Escalating and De-Escalating Therapy in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer: Optimizing Treatment in Residual Disease [CompassHER2 RD; NCT04457596; A011801]), as well as two other investigator-initiated trials: PROMISE (A Prospective Study to evaluate the role of Tumor Sequencing in Women Receiving Palbociclib for Advanced Hormone Receptor (HR)-Positive, Breast Cancer; NCT03281902) and ACCRU-BR01, A Phase I/II Trial of Abemaciclib and T-DM1 in Women and Men with HER2-Positive Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer Who Progressed on Treatment with a Taxane, Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab (NCT04351230). She is an ASCO Career Conversations Mentor and serves on the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology (ALLIANCE) breast committee. She is also a reviewer for several journals including Breast Cancer Research and Treatment and Clinical Cancer Research.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 13
"Novel therapeutic approaches in HER2 negative breast cancer"

Mafalda Oliveira, MD PhD
Attending Physician
Vall d'Hebron Hospital / VHIO

Mafalda Oliveira MD, PhD, is a medical oncologist at the Medical Department of the Vall d'Hebron University Hospital and Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO) in Barcelona since 2011. She has completed a Master in Clinical Research in June 2013 and a PhD in Medicine in July 2017, both at the Universidad Autònoma de Barcelona.Dr. Oliveira’s research interest focuses on the study of the molecular alterations and evolution of metastatic breast cancer, the clinical development of new drugs (especially by designing clinical trials with innovative biological hypotheses), and on the application of liquid biopsies as diagnostic, predictive, and prognostic tools in breast cancer. She is involved as Principal Investigator in multiple phase I, phase II, and phase III clinical trials in breast cancer, with drugs that target the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, CDK4/6 inhibitors, oral SERDs, new epigenetic drugs, ADCs, and cancer immunotherapy drugs.She is also a member of the Executive Board and the Scientific Committee of SOLTI-Breast Cancer Research Group (an academic cooperative research group based in Spain), and a member of ASCO, ESMO, SEOM, and AACR.



William L. McGuire Memorial Lecture

Moderator
Educational Session
"Refining Hereditary Risk"

Olufunmilayo  Olopade, MD, FASCO, FACP,  OON
Walter L Palmer Distinguished Service Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics
University of Chicago Medicine

Walter L. Palmer Distinguished Service Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics and founding director of the Center for Clinical Cancer Genetics and Global Health at the University of Chicago Medical Center, Olopade's research is focused on gaining a better understanding of the root causes and genomic basis of cancer in diverse populations. She has published extensively on genetic and non-genetic risk factors for breast cancer and is internationally renowned for her seminal work in inherited cancer syndromes and clinical expertise in early detection and prevention of breast cancer in high risk women. Olopade mapped genes frequently altered in cancer and has characterized and dissected molecular pathways defining aggressive forms of breast cancer in women of African ancestry.  A distinguished scholar and mentor, Olopade has received numerous honors and awards including honorary degrees from five universities, elected into the National Academy of Sciences, recipient of the Giants In Cancer Care Award, Franklin Roosevelt Freedom from Want Medal, The Order of Lincoln, Officer of the Order of the Niger and a 2005 MacArthur Fellowship for "translating findings on the molecular genetics of breast cancer in African and African-American women into innovative clinical practices in the United States and abroad." 

Dr. Olopade earned her medical degree from the University of Ibadan College of Medicine in Nigeria. She trained in Internal Medicine at Cook County Hospital in Chicago and in Oncology, Hematology and Cancer Genetics at the Joint Section of Hematology and Oncology at the University of Chicago. She serves as director on several Civic and Corporate Boards.



Speaker
Special Session
"Regulatory Insights to the 2021 Early Stage Breast Cancer Approval"

Christy Osgood, MD
Clinical Team Leader
Food and Drug Administration



Discussant
Spotlight Session 10
"Novel Immunotherapy Approaches"

David B. Page, MD
Medical Oncology
Earle A. Chiles Research Institute of the Providence Cancer Institute

Dr. Page is a medical oncologist and clinical investigator in the field of breast cancer immuno-oncology. He conducted his internal medicine residency at New York Presbyterian Hospital / Columbia University Medical Center (New York, NY), and his medical oncology fellowship at New York Presbyterian Hospital / Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (New York, NY). 

At the Earle A. Chiles Research Institute in Portland, OR, he serves as PI of several investigator initiated trials evaluating the role of novel immunotherapy combinations in both early stage and metastatic breast cancer. In the context of these trials he is developing statistical approaches for characterizing the spatial patterning of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes.

Dr. Page has served on the National Cancer Institute’s Breast Cancer Immuno-Oncology Task Force and the SITC Breast Cancer Immunotherapy Expert Panel. He also also serves as the champion for the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology for two international phase III trials evaluating immunotherapy in breast cancer. 



Speaker
Clinical Science Forum
"OMD data and gaps in breast cancer"

David Palma, MD, PhD
Radiation Oncologist
London Health Sciences Centre

Dr. David Palma is a Radiation Oncologist at the London Health Sciences Centre and a Clinician-Scientist with the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research. He specializes in the treatment of thoracic cancers, head and neck cancers, and oligometastatic disease. 

He holds a BSc from Queen’s University (Canada), an MD from the University of Western Ontario (Canada), a Master’s Degree in Epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health, and a PhD from the VU University Medical Center (Netherlands). He completed his residency training at the University of British Columbia. 

Dr. Palma's research focuses on translational imaging science, including evaluating new imaging and radiotherapy technologies in the pre-clinical and clinical setting. He currently leads or co-leads several clinical trials. He is the chair of the Canadian Pulmonary Radiotherapy Investigators (CAPRI) Group. Dr. Palma has published over 200 peer-reviewed scientific articles.  Dr. Palma is also the founder of the patient information website www.qualitycancertreatment.com, which focuses on empowering patients to obtain the best quality cancer care possible.



Moderator
Special Session
COVID-19 and Cancer

Speaker
Special Session
COVID-19 and Cancer

Ko Un (Clara) Park, MD
Assistant Professor
The Ohio State University
James Comprehensive Cancer Center

Dr. Park is a breast surgical oncologist who specializes in the multidisciplinary treatment of breast cancer patients.She is an assistant professor in the Division of Surgical Oncology at The Ohio State University and a board certified surgeon and completed breast surgical oncology fellowship at MD Anderson Cancer Center.

She maintains a busy clinical research program in implementation science and serves as a member of Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology/American College of Surgeons Clinical Research Program. Her research interests include improving patient outcomes through implementation science, clinical trials, oncoplastic breast surgery, and outcomes research including optimizing pain control and opioid use after breast surgery. 

She has co-authored many articles in well-respected publications, including Annals of Surgery, Annals of Surgical Oncology, Journal of the American College of Surgeons and Journal of Surgical Oncology.



Moderator
Molecular Tumor Board

Ben Ho Park MD, PhD
Professor of Medicine
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

Dr. Park attended The University of Chicago for his A.B. degree, followed by dual training at The University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine where he received both his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees. Dr. Park then trained in Internal Medicine and Hematology/Oncology at The University of Pennsylvania prior to completing a post-doctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Dr. Bert Vogelstein at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Park then joined the faculty in the Breast Cancer Program at The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins and was Professor of Oncology, Associate Director of Education and Research Training and Associate Dean of Postdoctoral Affairs for the School of Medicine prior to joining Vanderbilt University Medical Center in 2018. He is currently the Donna S. Hall Chair in Breast Cancer, Professor of Medicine and Director for the Division of Heme/Onc, Co-Leader of the Breast Cancer Research Program, Associate Director for Translational Research and Director of Precision Oncology at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center. His research program involves identifying and validating genetic targets for breast cancer therapy and diagnostics. In particular, Dr. Park has pioneered the use of “liquid biopsies” to help guide future management of breast cancer therapies. He has also led the formation and implementation of molecular tumor boards at Hopkins and other institutions, and more recently at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 13
"Novel therapeutic approaches in HER2 negative breast cancer"

Heather Parsons, MD, MPH
Medical Oncologist
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute



Panel Member
View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?

Ann H. Partridge, MD, MPH
Medical Oncologist
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Partridge received her MD from Cornell University Medical College in 1995. She completed her residency in internal medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and went on to complete fellowships in medical oncology and hematology at DFCI. Later she received an MPH from Harvard School of Public Health. She is a medical oncologist focusing on the care of women with breast cancer, and she has a particular interest in the psychosocial, behavioral, and communication issues in breast cancer care and treatment.



Speaker
COVID-19 and Cancer
"How COVID changed cancer center operations"

Debra Patt, MD, PhD, MBA, FASCO
Medical Oncologist
Texas Oncology

Dr. Debra Patt is an Executive Vice President of Texas Oncology, a clinical professor at Dell Medical School, and a breast cancer specialist in Austin, Texas who has a career research focus in clinical cancer informatics and healthcare policy. She is a fierce advocate for improving healthcare, and improving cancer care across the globe. Locally, she led the breast cancer programs at Seton Hospital for over 10 years developing a multidisciplinary breast tumor board and directing the breast center. She has chaired the annual fundraising campaigns for the Breast Cancer Resource Center in central Texas, led grant funding efforts for the Women Who Conquer Cancer and the Conquer Cancer Foundation, Chaired the Light the Night Campaign for Central Texas and chaired fundraising efforts for the American Cancer Society. Her mentorshipof medical students and residents at Dell Medical School fosters the professional development of trainees and translated in to presentations at scientific meetings, and research publicationsin addition to improvements in clinical care delivery. While recently serving as the Chair for the Council on Legislation for the Texas Medical Association, she advocates for improving the healthcare of all Texans and has lobbied for closure of the gap in insurance coverage. She has testified before the United States Congress to protect access to care for Medicare beneficiaries and advocates for cancer patients at the highest levels of the state and federal government. She is a leader in clinical cancer informatics and serves as the inaugural Editor in Chief of JCO-Clinical Cancer Informatics and has led multiple innovative informatics and analytics initiatives including launching Telemedicine in Texas Oncology, implementing Electronic Patient Reported Outcomes (ePROs) in Texas Oncology, and Working with The US Oncology Network to study the effectiveness of clinical decision support to improve compliance with evidence based treatment within clinical pathways. Her informatics research includes leading the development of clinical decision support embedded within the electronic health record and works to develop electronic patient reported outcomes embedded within patient support tools within patient portals. 

She is the principal investigator for predictive analytics to predict and reduce hospitalizations inpatients with advanced cancer, and is leading efforts to understand the value of ePROs in community oncology. She serves as the current President of the Texas Society of Clinical Oncology and the Secretary for the Community Oncology Alliance. Dr. Debra Patt is an Executive Vice President of Texas Oncology, a clinical professor at Dell Medical School, and a breast cancer specialist in Austin, Texas who has a career research focus in clinical cancer informatics and healthcare policy. She is a fierce advocate for improving healthcare, and improving cancer care across the globe. Locally, she led the breast cancer programs at Seton Hospital for over 10 years developing a multidisciplinary breast tumor board and directing the breast center. She has chaired the annual fundraising campaigns for the Breast Cancer Resource Center in central Texas, led grant funding efforts for the Women Who Conquer Cancer and the Conquer Cancer Foundation, Chaired the Light the Night Campaign for Central Texas and chaired fundraising efforts for the American Cancer Society. Her mentorship of medical students and residents at Dell Medical School fosters the professional development of trainees and translated in to presentations at scientific meetings, and research publications in addition to improvements in clinical care delivery. While recently serving as the Chair forthe Council on Legislation for the Texas Medical Association, she advocates for improvingthe healthcare of all Texans and has lobbied for closure of the gap in insurance coverage. Shehas testified before the United States Congress to protect access to care for Medicare beneficiaries and advocates for cancer patients at the highest levels of the state and federal government. She is a leader in clinical cancer informatics and serves as the inaugural Editor in Chief of JCO-Clinical Cancer Informatics and has led multiple innovative informatics and analytics initiatives including launching Telemedicine in Texas Oncology, implementing Electronic Patient Reported Outcomes (ePROs) in Texas Oncology, and Working with The US Oncology Network to study the effectiveness of clinical decision support to improve compliance with evidence based treatment within clinical pathways. Her informatics research includes leading the development of clinical decision support embedded within the electronic health record and works to develop electronic patient reported outcomes embedded within patient support tools within patient portals. She is the principal investigator for predictive analytics to predict and reduce hospitalizations inpatients with advanced cancer, and is leading efforts to understand the value of ePROs in community oncology. She serves as the current President of the Texas Society of Clinical Oncology and the Secretary for the Community Oncology Alliance. Dr. Debra Patt is an Executive Vice President of Texas Oncology, a clinical professor at Dell Medical School, and a breast cancer specialist in Austin, Texas who has a career research focus in clinical cancer informatics and healthcare policy. She is a fierce advocate for improving healthcare, and improving cancer care across the globe. Locally, she led the breast cancer programs at Seton Hospital for over 10 years developing a multidisciplinary breast tumor board and directing the breast center. She has chaired the annual fundraising campaigns for the Breast Cancer Resource Center in central Texas, led grant funding efforts for the Women Who Conquer Cancer and the Conquer Cancer Foundation, Chaired the Light the Night Campaign for Central Texas and chaired fundraising efforts for the American Cancer Society. Her mentorship of medical students and residents at Dell Medical School fosters the professional development of trainees and translated in to presentations at scientific meetings, and research publications in addition to improvements in clinical care delivery. While recently serving as the Chair for the Council on Legislation for the Texas Medical Association, she advocates for improving the healthcare of all Texans and has lobbied for closure of the gap in insurance coverage. She has testified before the United States Congress to protect access to care for Medicare beneficiaries and advocates for cancer patients at the highest levels of the state and federal government. She is a leader in clinical cancer informatics and serves as the inaugural Editor in Chief of JCO-Clinical Cancer Informatics and has led multiple innovative informatics and analytics initiatives including launching Telemedicine in Texas Oncology, implementing Electronic Patient Reported Outcomes (ePROs) in Texas Oncology, and Working with The US Oncology Network to study the effectiveness of clinical decision support to improve compliance with evidence based treatment within clinical pathways. Her informatics research includes leading the development of clinical decision support embedded within the electronic health record and works to develop electronic patient reported outcomes embedded within patient support tools within patient portals. She is the principal investigator for predictive analytics to predict and reduce hospitalizations inpatients with advanced cancer, and is leading efforts to understand the value of ePROs in community oncology. She serves as the current President of the Texas Society of Clinical Oncology and the Secretary for the Community Oncology Alliance.


Panel Member
Special Session
"Re-framing Leadership in Academic Breast Oncology post COVID-19"

Kornelia Polyak, MD, PhD
Professor of Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Polyak obtained her M.D. degree in 1991 from the Albert Szent-Györgyi Medical School in Szeged Hungary and her Ph.D. degree in 1995 from Cornell University Graduate School of Medical Sciences/Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York. Dr. Polyak completed her postdoctoral training in Baltimore at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center in the laboratory of Drs. Bert Vogelstein and Ken Kinzler. Dr. Polyak joined the faculty of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School in 1998 as Assistant Professor of Medicine and was promoted to Professor in 2011. Dr. Polyak’s laboratory is dedicated to the molecular analysis of human breast cancer with the goal improving the clinical management of breast cancer patients. Her lab has devoted much effort to develop new ways to study tumors as a whole and to apply interdisciplinary approaches. Using these methods Dr. Polyak’s lab has been at the forefront of studies analyzing purified cell populations from normal and neoplastic human breast tissue at genomic scale and in situ at single cell level and to apply mathematical and ecological models for the better understanding of breast tumor evolution. She has also been successful with the clinical translation of her findings including the testing of efficacy of JAK2 and BET bromodomain inhibitors for the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer in clinical trials. Dr. Polyak have received numerous awards including the Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research in 2011, the 2012 AACR Outstanding Investigator Award for Breast Cancer Research, and the Rosalind Franklin Award in 2016. She is also a 2015 recipient of the NCI Outstanding Investigator award.


Speaker
Educational Session
"ER/HER2+ cross talk"

Charles M. Perou, PhD
Professor of Genetics
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Dr. Charles Perou's research over the past 23 years has focused on the genomics, genetics, and cell biology of breast cancers. His research crosses the disciplines of genomics, genetics, cancer biology, bioinformatics, epidemiology, and clinical research. A major focus of his lab has been on the characterization of the diversity of breast tumors that resulted in the discovery of the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer, and which also identified the Basal-like/Triple-Negative Breast Cancer subtype. They demonstrated that breast cancers can be divided into at least five molecular subtypes using the “PAM50” assay, with his lab focusing particular experimental attention on the Basal-like subtype.  They have also elucidated many of the genetic causes that give rise to each molecular subtype, modeled these events in Genetically Engineered Mouse Models, and then using these models to investigate tumor biology, immune system interactions, and the efficacy of novel drug combinations. 

Dr. Perou is currently the Co-Director of the UNC Computational Medicine Program, Co-Director of the LCCC Breast Cancer Program, and Faculty Director of the LCCC Bioinformatics Group. On a national level he serves as a member of the ALLIANCE Breast Committee, and as an Executive Steering Committee Member of the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC).

He has published more than 425 peer reviewed articles, which have received >188,000 citations (ORCHID ID: 0000-0001-9827-2247).



Speaker
AACR Distinguished Lectureship in Breast Cancer Research

Helen M. Piwnica-Worms, PhD
Professor, Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Piwnica-Worms is Professor of Experimental Radiation Oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Piwnica-Worms completed a B.A. in Biology at St. Olaf College (1979), a Ph.D. degree in microbiology and immunology at Duke University Medical School (1984) and a postdoctoral fellowship at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (1988). She was Instructor of Pathology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for one year prior to moving to Tufts University Medical School where she was Assistant Professor of Physiology (1989-1992) followed by Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Hospital, Boston where she was Associate Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics (1992-1994). In 1994, Dr. Piwnica-Worms moved to Washington University School of Medicine where she was the Gerty T. Cori Professor, an HHMI Investigator and served as Chair of the Department of Cell Biology and Physiology as well as Associate Director of Basic Science at the Alvin J. Siteman Comprehensive Cancer Center.  She relocated her research program to MD Anderson in 2013 where she holds the Senator A. M. Aikin Jr. Distinguished Chair. 

Dr. Piwnica-Worms has published over 140 papers in top peer-reviewed journals, including Nature, Cell, and Science. Her professional career has been distinguished by a commitment to service both inside and outside of her home institution. She serves or has served on the scientific advisory board and prize committees of numerous organizations, including the Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research, the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, the AT Children’s Project, the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute at University of Pennsylvania, the V Foundation, the Pew Innovation Advisory Committee, and the National Advisory Committee of the Pew-Stewart Scholars Program for Cancer Research. She is a member of the external advisory boards of the Yale Cancer Center, the Simmons Cancer at UT Southwestern; the Perlmutter Cancer Center at New York University and she serves on the EAB of NCI P01 esophageal cancer at Herbert Irving Comprehensive Center at Columbia University. She is a member of the board of directors for the Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas (TAMEST) and served on the Membership Panel of the Academy of Arts and Sciences Class II, Section 5. Dr. Piwnica-Worms remains active in the AACR, having served on the Board of Directors, the program committee for several annual meetings, AACR award committees as well as the publication committee.  She has been a scientific editor for Cancer Discovery since its inception 10 years ago. She has won numerous awards in recognition of her scientific accomplishments, service and mentorship, including being honored as a Pew Scholar in Biomedical Sciences, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, and an American Cancer Society Professor. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science and recipient of the 2018 Laura Zisken Prize for Breast Cancer Translational Research from Stand Up to Cancer.

Dr. Piwnica-Worms early work illuminated many of the fundamental tenets of cell cycle and checkpoint control. Her research \currently focuses on identifying alterations with functional significance to the development and progression of breast cancer. A major effort is directed towards elucidating the contribution made by heterogeneity (genomic, phenotypic, spatial and compositional) in both the tumor and its microenvironment to cancer progression, metastasis and resistance to therapy. 


Speaker
Mini-Symposium
"Can genomic risk be used to tailor radiation therapy?"

Philip Poortmans, MD, PhD
Radiation Oncologist
Iridium Netwerk

For many years, Philip Poortmans involvement in teaching takes an important part of his time. Internationally, in the framework of the ESTRO School of Radiotherapy and Oncology, he serves as course director of the teaching course “Multidisciplinary Management of Breast Cancer”, on alternate years general and for (A)PBI, and as liaison person for multidisciplinary courses. Currently, he is also member of the faculty for educational activities of ESMO; ESSO and ESO.For several years now, he is a member of the editorial committees of several guidelines for breast cancer (EUSOMA; ESTRO; ESMO; St Gallen) and for cancer and pregnancy (ESGO / INCIP; ESMO; AKZ (Adviesgroep Kanker en Zwangerschap); ABCIP). In addition, he Co-Chairs ECCO’s Quality Cancer Care Network and have a coordinating role for the "Essential requirements for quality cancer care".

Since 1992 Dr. Poortman is actively involved in the EORTC, especially in the Radiation Oncology,  Lymphoma and Breast Groups but also directly and indirectly in other groups through the input of medical oncologists, haematologists and other members of the multidisciplinary team treating the cancer patients in the region. In the function of secretary and Quality Assurance officer of the Radiation Oncology Group he had the opportunity to participate in the writing of several protocols and to coordinate the quality assurance in a number of radiotherapy studies. From 2004 until 2015, he was member of the Quality Assurance Committee of the EORTC. For the Lymphoma Group, he co-ordinated a prospective phase II trial in primary central nervous system lymphoma. 

He is an active member of the EORTC Breast Group as well. Beside this, he contributed frequently in the framework of other multicentre initiatives like a growing number of Dutch clinical trials and the projects of the Rare Cancer Network. Other activities include membership of the editorial boards of Radiotherapy and Oncology, The Breast (specialty editor for radiation oncology), Cancer Radiothérapie, Egyptian Journal of Oncology, Revista de Senologia y Patologia Mamaria (associate editor), Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Breast Cancer, European Journal of Surgical Oncology (editorial advisory board for radiation therapy), The European Journal of Breast Health, the Journal of Radiation and Medical Oncology (Roumenia) and, finally, Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. In 2018-2019, he was a member of the “International Advisory Board” of The Lancet Oncology. Moreover, he served and serve in several scientific committees, international advisory boards and make active contributions to a number of conferences, teaching courses and workshops or as reviewer for several journals and trial organisations. In 2015, he was a member of the Quality Assurance Scheme Development Group of the European Initiative on Breast Cancer (ECIBC) from the European CommissionIn 2005, and was elected as councillor of the board of ESTRO for a term of 3 years. For 3 years, starting in 2007, he was the representative for radiation oncology in the Multidisciplinary Oncology Committee of ESMO. After the elections for the ESTRO presidency in 2013, he received the support from the membership to take on the task as president-elect, from 2014-2016 as president of the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology and from 2016-2018 as past-president of ESTRO. In 2016 and 2017, he chaired the “Oncopolicy” committee of ECCO, followed by the position of president of ECCO, serving in 2018 and 2019. During 2020, he continued to serve for one year as past-president of ECCOI lecture in 4 languages, apart from English also in Dutch, French and, his favourite, Spanish.



Moderator
Mini-Symposium
"DNA Repair in Breast Cancer: Diagnosis and Treatment"

Simon N. Powell, MD, PhD, FRCP
Radiation Oncologist
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center



Speaker
Translational Science Forum
"Molecular heterogeneity in HER2+ breast cancer - can outcomes be predicted?"

Aleix Prat, MD, PhD
Head Medical Oncology Department
Hospital Clínic Barcelona

Dr. Aleix Prat is currently the Head of the Medical Oncology Department of Hospital Clínic Barcelona (Spain), Associate Professor of the University of Barcelona and the Head of the Translational Genomics and Targeted Therapeutics in Solid Tumors Group at August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS). He obtained his MD degree in 2003 from the University of Barcelona and completed a medical oncology fellowship in 2008 at Vall d´Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO). In 2008, Dr. Prat became a postdoctoral research associate at the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA) in the Laboratory of Prof. Charles M. Perou. In 2012, he returned to Barcelona as the Head of the Translational Genomics Group at VHIO and later, he moved to Hospital Clínic and IDIBAPS (2014).

Dr. Prat is a clinical scientist with a longstanding research interest in the clinical application of laboratory findings in breast cancer, with a particular interest in gene expression and the clinical implications of different intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer and also he designs and leads clinical trials of novel drugs and approaches at SOLTI, a Spanish breast cancer cooperative group. As Scientific Coordinator of the Scientific Board of Solti, he was appointed a member of the Executive Committee of The Breast International Group (BIG) in 2018, an international non-profit organization that includes more than 56 cooperative groups from around the world, more than 10,000 experts and it is linked to more than 3,000 hospitals. Its main goal is to promote clinical and translational research in breast cancer. Since May 2019 he left the scientific coordination to assume the Presidency of the Board of Directors of SOLTI. Furthermore, he is the Head of the Breast Cancer programme at IOB-Quirón Salud as well as co-founder of the recent spin-off called Reveal Genomics. Most recently Dr. Prat has been designed member of the Scientific Committee of the “Precision Oncology Program in the Catalan Public Health System”. Servei Català de la Salut. (Catalonia, Spain).

During his career, Dr. Prat has received competitive funding from different sources including the Spanish government and various other funding organizations such as the Susan G. Komen Foundation and received the International Prize for Breast Cancer Research (Padova, Italy) for his scientific discoveries regarding the characterization and clinical value of the intrinsic subtypes. The more recent and one of the most valuable ones is the award hold by the Breast Cancer Research Foundation-AACR Career Development Awards for Translational Breast Cancer Research (150.000 USD) that will allow me to led the project ”Tailoring systemic treatment of Luminal B breast cancer”. In 2018 he was awarded the “Grup Consolidat AGAUR” credential by the Catalonia Government. He has a strong background both participating and leading competitive projects supported by the European Commission; he is mentor of two EU funded projects: Exh-Res-CART- Exhaustion resistent CAR-T cells for the treatment of solid tumors (Sonia Gyedan) and PDX-PC-Elucidation of tumour cell plasticity mechanisms associated to treatment in metastatic prostate càncer. (Mercedes Marin). He holds two issued patents (WO2018/103834A1 and WO/2018/096191), which certificates a stable scientific career.

Since 2007, he has actively taken part in a total of 170 publications (H-Index Score of 51), with a total of 13.479 citations and 95 communications in international conferences. At his early age he has supervised 3 PhD (plus 5 that are current) and 4 Honours students.



Chair
Spotlight Session 15
"Defining molecular markers of endocrine resistance in clinic"

Lajos Pusztai, MD, DPhil
Professor of Medicine
Yale University, School of Medicine

Dr. Lajos Pusztai's goal is to “divide and conquer” breast cancer through identification of molecularly defined subtypes and designing distinct strategies for curing each subtype. His laboratory at Yale includes a “wet” lab and a bioinformatics team. In the laboratory, they focus on developing new drugs for triple-negative breast cancer and explore new paradigms in cancer biology. They investigate how interactions between germline polymorphisms and somatic mutations collectively determine the malignant phenotype. They also study how the tumor immune microenvironment influences the course of the disease and if it could be exploited for treatment which has led to several ongoing immunotherapy trials in breast cancer. The bioinformatics team in his laboratory analyzes and develops new methodologies for interpreting gene expression and next-generation sequencing data and works on developing innovative trial designs. 



Moderator
Special Session
"COVID-19 and Cancer"

Susan Rafte
Community Advocate
Baylor College of Medicine



Speaker
Special Session
"Community cancer center perspective on diversity in clinical trial accrual and biospecimen donation"

Amelie G. Ramirez, DrPH
Professor and Chair
UT Health San Antonio

Dr. Amelie G. Ramirez, Chair and Professor of Population Health Sciences and Director of the Institute for Health Promotion Research at UT Health San AntonioAmelie G. Ramirez, DrPH, is an internationally recognized health disparities researcher at UT Health San Antonio and a member of the National Academy of Medicine since 2006. She has 30 years of experience conducting behavioral and communications projects to reduce cancer, increase screening rates and clinical trial participation, prove the efficacy of patient navigation for cancer patients, prevent tobacco use, and improve healthy lifestyles among our underrepresented communities in South Texas and nationally.

She has a proven track record of scientific innovation, local, national, and international leadership, and pioneering health disparities research networks in chronic disease control and prevention and tobacco cessation among minority populations. Dr. Ramirez has more than 30 years of experience designing, implementing, directing, and evaluating more than 100 large-scale collaborative research studies, randomized controlled trials, and research networks focused on human and organizational communication targeting positive behavior changes in cancer, chronic disease, healthy lifestyles, tobacco cessation, and obesity prevention among under-served minority populations, especially Latinos, in a variety of settings from the clinic to the community to the nation. All prior projects utilized proven scientific theories and methodologies, incorporated collaborations with other researchers, and effectively administered project logistics. These projects led to unique health communication models and interventions that have identified racial/ethnic cancer and chronic disease disparities and risk factors and contributed to behavior change, such as increasing cancer screening rates, improving access to health care, and improving healthy lifestyles to reduce cancer and obesity risk.   Dr. Ramirez also has developed and managed national networks with multiple sites and objectives, including experimental interventions, health policy research, and dissemination which fueled research, education, and awareness advancements with leaders in five U.S. regions. She directs the Salud America! Hispanic health multimedia communication infrastructure and dissemination network, which promotes health equity through its national digital network of over 400,000 community leaders and healthcare professionals who are fueled with educational content and tools to advocate for equitable changes in policies, systems, and environments in Hispanic communities, especially amid COVID-19. She is director of the NCI-funded Éxito! Latino Cancer Research Leadership  Training program, which offers an annual summer institute and internships to encourage Latino master’s-level students and health professionals to pursue doctoral degrees and careers in research.

Dr. Ramirez is a Susan G. Komen Scholar and a member of the National Advisory Council on Minority Health and Health Disparities of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD). Her recognitions include: 2007 election to the National Academy of Medicine; 2011 White House “Champion of Change”; 2014 APHA Everett M. Rogers Public Health Communication Award; 2018 Icons in Healthcare Award from CentroMed; and 2019 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society of Behavioral Medicine. In Texas, Dr. Ramirez is on the San Antonio Mayor’s Fitness Council and is prior President of The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas. Dr. Ramirez, a native of Laredo, Texas, earned MPH and DrPH degrees from UT Health Science Center at the Houston School of Public Health.



Co-Chair
Spotlight Session 11
"The future is Now: Innovation in Pathology and Radiology"

Sughra Raza, MD
Staff Radiologist
University of Massachusetts Medical School

In practice as a full time radiologist since 1989. Her focus is in women's Imaging 1991 to 2006 at Harvard Medical School. She specialized in Breast Imaging only as full time radiologist at Harvard Medical School from 2006-2021.

She was the director of Women's Imaging and Breast Imaging fellowships at Brigham & women's Hospital 2001 - 2017 and Associate Director Breast Imaging Beth Israel Hospital 1995 - 2001.

Dr. Raza was the Associate Director Breast Imaging Brigham and Women's Hospital 2001 - 2017 and is currently the Associate Prof Radiology Harvard Medical School till 2021Professor of Radiology University of Massachusetts.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Changes in early detection - screening and MRD"

Pedram Razavi, MD, MPH
Assistant Attending Physician
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Razavi is a board-certified medical oncologist who graduated from the Tehran University of Medical Sciences.  He completed his internal medicine residency training at the University of Southern California and completed his medical oncology fellowship at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center where he is currently an Assistant Attending Physician on the Breast Medicine Service.  Dr. Razavi’s research efforts have been focused on two major areas: 1) integrative analyses of genomic and clinical data to guide hypothesis-based translational research in breast cancer, and 2) the development of circulating tumor biomarkers such as circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), methylomes and circulating tumor cells to characterize cancer on a systemic and molecular level.

Over the past six years, he had led efforts to molecularly profile primary and metastatic breast cancers using different sequencing technologies and developed computational and analytical platforms to systematically analyze genomic and clinicopathologic data to identify biomarkers of resistance and response to therapy and to predict outcomes. Those efforts have shed light on the mutational landscape of metastatic breast cancer and revealed novel mechanisms of resistance to endocrine therapy and CDK4/6 inhibitors and uncovered specific patterns of double PIK3CA mutations in cis that predicts sensitivity to PI3K inhibition.

Recent advances in sequencing technologies have expanded the ability to precisely detect tumor-derived somatic alteration using plasma samples. This has allowed him to assist in establishing the MSK Breast Cancer Liquid Biopsy Program to study wide array of practical clinical applications of liquid biopsies including tumor genomic profiling, detection of micrometastatic minimal residual disease, monitoring disease burden, and discovery of mechanisms of resistance and monitoring disease evolution on therapy. He was the lead investigator for development of a high intensity ctDNA assay to interrogate a large genomic footprint at ultradeep sequencing depth.

As a physician-scientist, he has a deep professional commitment to translational research with the aim of rationally developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics and ultimately to improve outcomes for patients with breast cancer.



Moderator
Educational Session
"Artificial Intelligence: Beyond the Soundbites"

Jorge S. Reis-Filho, MD, PhD
Director, Experimental Pathology
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center 

Jorge S. Reis-Filho, MD PhD FRCPath, holds a joint medical degree from University of Porto, Portugal and Universidade Federal do Parana, Brazil. After finishing his histopathology training at the Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, Portugal, he did his PhD on breast cancer molecular pathology at the Breakthrough Research Centre at The Institute of Cancer Research/ Royal Marsden Hospital in London, UK, where he was appointed Team Leader of the Molecular Pathology Laboratory in 2006. In 2007, Dr. Reis-Filho was awarded the CL Oakley Lectureship by the Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland and the BACR Translational Research Award. In 2010, Dr. Reis-Filho was awarded the 2010 Ramzi Cotran Young Investigator Award by the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology and the Future Leaders Prize by Cancer Research UK. Dr. Reis-Filho is the youngest ever Fellow of The Royal College of Pathologists to have become a member by published works. In 2012, Dr. Reis-Filho took the position of Member at the Department of Pathology and Affiliate Member of the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, USA, and in 2016, he was appointed Director of Experimental Pathology and Director of the Experimental Pathology Fellowship Program. Dr. Reis-Filho has published over 540 peer reviewed articles, is an associate editor of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, deputy editor of npj Breast Cancer, a member of the editorial board of Genome Biology, and a member of the expert panel of the World Health Organization for the classification of breast tumors and soft tissue tumors.

Dr. Reis-Filho’s current research interests are in the development of biomarkers and in the establishment of a predictive classification for breast cancers based on their patterns of DNA repair defects and genetic instability, and in defining the causes and impact of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in cancers. His team has approached these aims using a combination of traditional pathology approaches with high-throughput genomics and single cell genomics methods. He has led projects that resulted in the development of novel single cell sequencing technologies that can be applied to archival tissue samples, and has employed these methods to investigate the impact of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in the progression from in situ to invasive breast cancer and in the development of therapy resistance. Dr. Reis-Filho has also developed new sequencing methods for circulating cell-free tumor DNA and is currently investigating the utility of these methods in the context of disease monitoring, minimal residual disease assessment, and therapy resistance. He has a long-standing interest and a track record in the genomic analysis of the patterns of DNA repair defects and genetic instability in breast cancers, and co-leads one of the research projects (Research Project 1) and the Biospecimen Repository and Pathology Core of the MSKCC Genomics Instability in Breast Cancer SPORE.



Panel Member
Special Session
Trust in Science and Healthcare

Lisa C. Richardson, MD
Director
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, CDC



Discussant
Spotlight Session 3
"Targets in Triple Negative Breast Cancer"

Jennifer Richer, PhD
Professor
University of Colorado

Dr. Jennifer Richer, Professor of Pathology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus has studied nuclear hormone receptor action for over 25 years and served as Basic Science Chair for The Endocrine Society Annual Meeting 2021. She is a co-leader of the University of Colorado Cancer Center Tumor Host Interactions Program and Pl of the American Cancer Society Institutional Research Grant. Dr. Richer enjoys mentoring the next generation of biologists and in 2015 she received the Dean's Mentoring Award and NIH Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training (BEST) Faculty Sponsor Awards from the University of Colorado Graduate School. Trainees in her laboratory have held NCI F31s, F99/K00s, F32, and K22 awards, as well as DOD and ACS fellowships. Her translational research program focuses on mechanisms leading to breast cancer endocrine therapy resistance, effects of endocrine therapies on the tumor micro-environment and novel therapeutic approaches. Pre-clinical work from her NIH R01 investigating the role of androgen receptors (AR) in breast cancer led to two Department of Defense funded clinical trials with medical oncology collaborator Anthony Elias, MD. Her lab also studies non-coding RNA in breast and gynecologic carcinomas that lead to aberrant expression of immune-suppressive factors that normally support maternal-fetal tolerance. Dr. Richer is an associate editor for Breast Cancer Research and Endocrinology. She served as a standing member on NIH study sections (Tumor Cell Biology) and ad hoc for the Department of Defense and private foundations such as METAvivor, Susan G. Kamen and the March of Dimes.



Panel Member
Molecular Tumor Board

Bob Riter, BA, MHSA
Patient Advocate
Cornell University Physical Sciences Oncology Center

Bob Riter has been active in patient advocacy within the cancer world since he was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1996. For nearly twenty years, he was employed by the Cancer Resource Center of the Finger Lakes, a cancer support organization serving the cancer community in and around Ithaca, NY. Since his retirement in 2017, he has been employed as the patient advocate within Cornell University's Physical Sciences Oncology Center. His primary focus is connecting cancer researchers (and trainees) with the local patient community. The partnership between researchers and community members that they have developed at Cornell University is seen as a model that is being adopted elsewhere in the United States. 

He has published several articles and have made numerous presentations on patient advocacy to a variety of audiences. In addition, Mr. Riter has served as a patient advocate on research review panels for the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Program and the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.



Speaker
Special Session
COVID-19 and Cancer
"How COVID changed regulatory aspects"

Donna Rivera, PharmD
Associate Director of Pharmacoepidemiology
US Food & Drug Administration



Speaker
Workshop
"Genome editing in human organoids as new models for discovery"

Jennifer Rosenbluth, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor 
University of California San Francisco

Dr. Rosenbluth is a medical oncologist currently seeing breast cancer patients in clinic, while also performing bench-based translational cancer research in the Department of Medicine at UCSF.  Her areas of expertise include mammary cell biology, inflammatory breast cancer, and organotypic culturing methods.   She received extensive prior training in translational research through the MD-PhD Program at Vanderbilt University, where she examined the role of a p53 family member p73 in tumor suppression.  During her subsequent fellowship at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, she contributed to a new model system to study mammary tissue through the three dimensional culture of patient-derived breast organoids. She has used this system to develop living biobanks of normal, premalignant, and cancerous breast and ovarian tissues that are derived from PDXs, surgical specimen, and core biopsies, and has applied this technique to study premalignant cell states with the aim of gaining insight into early and potentially reversible tissue changes associated with cancer development.  She is also using co-culture systems to model tumor-stromal interactions in a rare aggressive subtype of breast cancer, inflammatory breast cancer.  Her lab at UCSF continues to develop new models of breast cancer risk, initiation and progression, with the ultimate goal of identifying molecular vulnerabilities that can be used to prevent and treat breast cancer.



Speaker
Special Session
"Regulatory Insights to the 2021 Early Stage Breast Cancer Approval"

Melanie Royce, MD, PhD
Clinical Officer
Food and Dug Administration

Melanie E Royce MD, PhD is a medical oncologist serving as a clinical reviewer for the Division of Oncology 1, Office of Oncologic Diseases, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research at the FDA. Her clinical focus is breast cancer and clinical trials especially among underserved populations and under resourced areas. Prior to joining the FDA, Dr. Royce’s career has been in academia, starting as an Assistant Professor at the Department of Breast Oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas where she completed her Medical Oncology Fellowship. In 2004, she joined the ranks of faculty recruited to the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque to assist with attaining NCI-designation and establishing a comprehensive cancer center where she served as the Director of the Multidisciplinary Breast Cancer Clinic and the Director of the Research Protocol and Data Management Office. She was also the Principal Investigator for the New Mexico NCI Minority/Underserved Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) Grant, until her departure from UNM in 2017.

Dr. Royce has served on the Executive Working Group of the Breast Cancer Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG), the NCI Breast Cancer Steering Committee and the Breast Oncology Local Disease (BOLD) Task Force, and two NCI review committees. Currently, she is an FDA observer for the NCI Breast Immuno-oncology (BIO) Task Force. 



Chair
Spotlight Session 5
" Life after breast cancer: Cardiac health, fertility preservation, and returning to life"

Kathryn Ruddy, MD, MPH 
Professor of Oncology
Mayo Clinic

Kathryn J. Ruddy is a breast medical oncologist at Mayo Clinic Rochester who co-leads the Population Sciences Program and the Symptom Control and Survivorship Cross-Disciplinary Group for the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. She also co-leads the Symptom Intervention Committee for the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology, and she serves on the NCI Breast Cancer Steering Committee as a special expert in QOL/Supportive Care.



Panel Member
Clinical Case Discussion

Hope S. Rugo, MD, FASCO
Professor of Medicine Director, Breast Oncology and Clinical Trials Education
University of California San Francisco
Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

Hope S. Rugo, MD, FASCO, is a medical oncologist and hematologist specializing in breast cancer research and treatment. A Professor of Medicine, Dr. Rugo joined the Breast Care Center in 1999 after a decade of experience at University of California San Francisco (UCSF) in malignant hematology and bone marrow transplantation for a variety of diseases, including breast cancer. She entered the field of breast cancer in order to incorporate novel therapies based on an understanding of the biology of cancer with excellent quality of care into the treatment of women with breast cancer.

Dr. Rugo is the Director of Breast Oncology and Clinical Trials Education at the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. She is a principal investigator of multiple clinical trials focusing on combining novel targeted therapeutics with standard treatment to improve the treatment of both early and late stage breast cancer, and has published widely in this area. Her current research interests include immunotherapy and combinations of targeted agents in the treatment of breast cancer to overcome resistance. In addition, Dr. Rugo has conducted a number of studies focusing on reducing toxicity from therapy, resulting in approval of scalp cooling to reduce chemotherapy induced hair loss, and a steroid mouthwash to reduce targeted agent stomatitis. She is an investigator and the chair of the Safety Committee for the multicenter adaptively randomized phase II I-SPY2 trial, and also serves on the Novel Agents Committee. Dr. Rugo is the co-chair of the Triple Negative Working Group and an active member of the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC), and is the principal investigator of several TBCRC trials including a multi-center immunotherapy trial funded by the Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF). She is an active member of the Alliance (formerly CALGB) Breast Committee, as well as ASCO, where she serves on the Guidelines Committee and as an editor for the Education Committee.

n addition to her research, Dr. Rugo is an active clinician, and is committed to education, regularly lecturing locally, nationally, and internationally on subjects relating to the treatment of and supportive care for breast cancer. At UCSF, Dr. Rugo runs the Breast Forum, an open bimonthly evening educational session for breast cancer patients, families, and friends from throughout the bay area.

Dr. Rugo graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1983. She completed a residency in internal medicine and primary care followed by a fellowship in hematology and oncology at the University of California San Francisco. She was a post-doctoral fellow in immunology participating in laboratory research at Stanford University from 1988-1990. In 1990, Dr. Rugo joined the faculty at UCSF in the Division of Hematology and Oncology. Dr. Rugo has been recognized for her excellence in both patient care and in teaching of both medical students and training physicians. She has received several awards including the Bank of America Giannini Foundation Award and a UCSF Clinical Cancer Center Investigator Research Program intra-mural award. In 2006, she was honored for her work in Breast Cancer Research by the Friends of the Breast Care Center.



Panel Member
View From The Trenches-What Will You Do On Monday Morning?

Ivis Sampayo
Chief Diversity Officer & Senior Director of Public Outreach
LatinaSHARE

Ivis is a 2-time breast cancer survivor. She joined the organization in May 1966, as the first LatinaSHARE Director where she used her knowledge of the NYC Latino community to develop programs that would enrich the Spanish community. Ivis' strong background in grassroots leadership helped her to develop LatinaSHARE program into one of the first Latino programs to provide various breast and ovarian cancer services in Spanish. Through her management and advocacy skills the LatinaSHARE program has seen growth of services and specific programs for the Latino communities, including the Novela project which provides awareness and education about breast cancer as well as the breaking of myths about this disease within this community.

In her current role at SAHRE Ivis continues to work at the continued efforts of helping underserved communities with support, education, awareness, resources and advocacy opportunities. This year she is working on a Multi-Cultural Initiative to help all communities. Ivis is a board member of the National Breast Cancer Coalition, a member of the Patient Advocate, Breast and Health Disparitites Committees at the Alliances on Clinical Trials in Oncology. She is also involved in various local and national committees. She has won local and national recognition as well as various awards through her work at SHARE.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 5
" Life after breast cancer: Cardiac health, fertility preservation, and returning to life"

Tara Sanft, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Yale School of Medicine

Dr. Tara Sanft is board certified in both medical oncology and palliative medicine, which she feels helps her treat the "whole person" and not just a disease. As a breast oncologist, she has a busy practice and is fortunate to serve on a CDC committee addressing breast cancer in young women. As the director of the Yale Survivorship Clinic, one of the nation’s only multi-disciplinary clinics specializing in cancer survivorship, she learns from patients about key issues after treatment and this informs her role as Vice Chair of the NCCN Survivorship Guidelines. Her research focuses on healthy lifestyles and quality of life after cancer. She recently became a facilitator for Relationship-Centered Communication Workshop that address how they develop therapeutic relationships with their patients and each other.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 8
"HER2 Positive Breast Cancer"

Cristina Saura, MD, PhD
Head, Breast Cancer Program
Vall d'hebron University Hospital

Dr. Cristina Saura is the Head of the Breast Cancer Unit of the Service of Medical Oncology of Vall d’Hebron University Hospital, and Principal Investigator of VHIO’s research group on Breast Cancer and Melanoma since September 2015. Dr. Saura graduated in Medicine from the University of Barcelona (UB) in 2002. From 2003 to 2007 she completed her internship in Medical Oncology at Vall d’Hebron Hospital in Barcelona. In 2007, Dr. Saura obtained her Master in Advanced Studies and Research Aptitude. with the project “Breast Cancer Early Detection Program in High-Risk Women: pilot breast mammography and breast magnetic resonance imaging tracking experience”, with an outstanding grade “A”. Her interest in clinical research led her to complete the Program in Clinical Effectiveness at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston in 2007. She subsequently earned her PhD in Medicine from the Universtat Autonoma of Barcelona (UAB) in 2017 with honors cum laude with the project entitled "Treatment of breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy". She was awarded a grant of the Strategic Plan for Research and Innovation in Health (PERIS) from the Generalitat de Catalunya in 2018 with the project "Precision medicine in metastatic breast cancer: determination of mutations in tumors and circulating DNA as a guide for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer".Dr. Saura has participated as Principal Investigator and co-investigator in multiple clinical trials in the field of research on breast cancer driven by her interest in the development of new drugs that improve the prognosis of patients. She is currently involved in different international studies with drugs targeted against molecular targets in breast cancer. The work of dr. Saura is focused on precision medicine and she occupies a prominent position in the development of PI3K inhibitors and new anti-HER2 treatments. In the field of pregnancy-related breast cancer, she is currently leading a project on early diagnosis of breast cancer based on the presence of circulating DNA in breast milk. She is the author of multiple publications, as well as communications at different national and international congresses.She is a member of the Scientific Committee and Board of Directors of the cooperative breast cancer group SOLTI, a member of the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM), and a member of GEICAM (Spanish Breast Cancer Research Group) and the European and American Oncology Societies (ESMO, ASCO).



Speaker
Educational Session
"Options for reducing risk for lymphedema when ALND/regional nodal XRT are needed"

Hani Sbitany, MD
Associate Professor of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Mount Sinai Medical Center



Speaker
Special Session
"Disparities in clinical trial accrual (COE)"

Lidia Schapira, MD, FASCO
Medical Oncologist
Stanford University School of Medicine

Dr. Lidia Schapira is Professor of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine and Director of Cancer Survivorship at the Stanford Cancer Institute. She graduated from Dartmouth Medical School and trained at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston in internal medicine and completed a hematology and oncology fellowship at the Brigham and Women's Hospital followed by a research fellowship in Aging at Harvard Medical School.Dr. Schapira’s clinical focus is in the treatment of breast cancer and cancer survivors. Her research addresses cancer outcomes and experiences of young breast cancer survivors, the psychosocial impact of cancer, and interventions to improve quality of life and health outcomes for people living with and beyond cancer. She holds leadership roles in national and international societies (American Society of Clinical Oncology and Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer) and serves as Editor-in-Chief of ASCO’s website for the public, Cancer.Net and Consultant Editor for Art of Oncology for the Journal of Clinical Oncology. 

Throughout multiple clinical, research, editorial and educational activities, Dr. Schapira has devoted her career to improving the experience and outcomes of patients and families with cancer and the education of cancer clinicians.



Chair
Spotlight Session 1
"Endocrine Resistance: Novel mechanisms and emerging new therapies"

Rachel Schiff, PhD
Professor
Baylor College of Medicine

Rachel Schiff, Ph.D.: Dr. Schiff is a Professor at the Lester & Sue Smith Breast Center and the Departments of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology in Baylor College of Medicine. She is an internationally recognized expert in breast cancer translational research with extensive experience in preclinical therapeutic and resistance models for various targeted therapies, as well as in correlative studies and associated biomarkers in clinical trials. Dr. Schiff received her PhD from the Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School in Jerusalem and completed her post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX. The major objectives of Dr. Schiff's research group are to explore the key oncogenic/signaling networks, develop biomarkers to design tailored targeted therapies, and identify the mechanisms responsible for resistance against targeted treatments and metastasis, particularly in estrogen receptor-positive and HER2-positive breast cancers. Major research themes include the crosstalk between the ER signaling network and growth factor and cellular kinase pathways, the role of ER co-regulators and pioneer factors in breast cancer development and progression to metastasis, the identification of genomic and epigenomic alterations underlying resistance to endocrine and HER2-targeted therapies and metastases, and the development of biomarkers for tailored therapeutic interventions. Dr. Schiff's research is partly supported by grants from the National Cancer Institute, The Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, and the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program. Dr. Schiff has co-authored over 150 peer-reviewed manuscripts and several book chapters in key textbooks in the field of breast cancer. 



Moderator
Educational Session
"Clinical Updates on Immunotherapy"

Speaker
The Year In Review
"Advanced breast cancer"

Peter Schmid, MD, PhD
Centre Lead, Centre of Experimental Cancer Medicines
Bart's Cancer Institute
Queen Mary University of London

Professor Schmid is internationally recognized for his research and education leadership in breast cancer. He is the clinical director of the Breast Cancer Centre and an honorary consultant medical oncologist at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital. He was appointed in 2013 as Chair in Cancer Medicine at Barts Cancer Institute (BCI), Queen Mary University, London. Professor Schmid is also Lead of the Centre of Experimental Cancer Medicine at Barts Cancer Institute, overseeing the conduct of early phase trials at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital and BCI, with a particular interest in Immunotherapy, innovative trial designs, and circulating biomarkers. He leads the academic breast cancer programme at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital and BCI.

Prof Schmid graduated from the Technical University of Munich medical school in 1997, gaining a MD in Clinical Chemistry in 1998 from the University of Munich and a Clinical Research PhD in 2005 from Charité University in Berlin. He trained at the University Hospital Charité in Berlin in internal medicine, hematology, and oncology, before he became a Senior Clinical Lecturer and Director of the Hammersmith Early Clinical Trials Unit at Imperial College London in 2005. Professor Schmid was appointed as Foundation Chair in Cancer Medicine at the University of Sussex in 2010 before taking on his current role at BCI in 2013.

Professor Schmid’s primary research interest is in clinical research in breast cancer with the goal of improving the treatment of women with breast cancer by defining more effective and less toxic approaches. Specific research areas include cancer immune therapy, triple-negative breast cancer, endocrine resistance, and innovative biomarker-driven trial concepts. Professor Schmid runs an international collaborative clinical and translational research programme.

Professor Schmid is the principal investigator of several pivotal breast cancer studies, including the Impassion130 trial that evaluated atezolizumab for advanced triple-negative breast cancer and led to the regulatory approval of the first immunotherapy strategy for patients with breast cancer, establishing a new standard of care of this disease. Professor Schmid is also the lead investigator of the KEYNOTE-522 trial which evaluated the immune-checkpoint inhibitor Pembrolizumab in combination with neoadjuvant chemotherapy for early triple-negative breast cancer and demonstrated a significant increase in pathological response rates. His work has been published in many journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Lancet Oncology, JAMA Oncology, Nature Communications and the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Prof Schmid is a member of several national and international cancer organizations and research groups and has been involved in international consensus meetings on the management of breast cancer. Professor Peter Schmid is a member of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) breast cancer faculty.



Panel Member
Educational Session

Rebecca Seago-Coyle
Patient Advocate

Ms. Rebecca Seago-Coyle is currently an active advocate for breast cancer research. She began advocating for breast cancer patients and breast cancer research after her own breast cancer diagnosis in 2010 at the age of 35. With her strong family history of breast cancer in the family, it has sparked her to advocate for breast cancer research and advocate for young women who are newly diagnosed.  Outside of her advocating role, she is a Project Manager, marathon runner, and cyclist. It’s important to her to inspire others live a healthy lifestyle. 

As she collaborates with talented and motivated investigators, it is her intent to represent the patient’s perspective. Her experience as a project manager, combined with her own survivor status, gives her a unique background that naturally lends itself to research and patient advocacy. Rebecca Seago-Coyles goal is to further her contribution through research as well as the design and implementation that brings the best research to the clinic to benefit patients.



Co-Chair
Spotlight Session 9
"Evaluating Emerging and Established Biomarkers"


Dennis Sgroi, MD
Professor of Pathology
Massachusetts General Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Dr. Sgroi is a Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School, and the Executive Vice Chair of Pathology, and a Member and Principal Investigator in the Division of Molecular Pathology Research and Center for Cancer Research at the Massachusetts General Hospital.  After completing a residency and chief residency in anatomic pathology at Massachusetts General Hospital, Dr. Sgroi completed a postdoctoral research fellowship in molecular pathology research at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. He is internationally recognized for his expertise in molecular breast pathology and in the development of molecular breast cancer biomarkers for personalized medicine for women with breast cancer. Dr. Sgroi has authored or coauthored over 140 publications and he has been invited to lecture at numerous national and international meetings and post-gradate courses. Dr Sgroi has received research grants from NIH/NCI, AACR, Commonwealth of Massachusetts Breast Cancer Research program, Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program (DOD-BCRP), Susan G. Komen Foundation, The Avon Foundation, The Hope Foundation/ Southwest Oncology and the Breast Cancer Research foundation. Dr. Sgroi has served on numerous grant review committees that include the NIH/NCI, the DOD-BCRP,  the Susan G. Komen Foundation, the Dutch Cancer Society, the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and the Terry Fox Research institute. He has served as a longstanding member of the SABCS and College of American Pathologists abstract committees, and ad hoc member of the NCCN Tumor Markers in Oncology and AACR Biomarker Section of the Clinical Research committees.



Speaker
Special Session
"COVID-19 and Cancer"

Dimpy Shah, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor
UT Health San Antonio

Dimpy Shah, MD, PhD is a tenure track Assistant Professor of Epidemiology in the Department of Population Health Sciences and Institute for Health Promotion Research at UTHealth San Antonio. She has cross-disciplinary expertise in respiratory viral epidemiology, data science, survivorship and outcomes research, and health disparities. Funded by American Cancer Society and Hope Research Foundation, Dr. Shah’s research program focuses on multi-institutional collaborations and consortium development, utilization of existing electronic medical record databases and biorepositories, outcome prediction development algorithms, and examination of host-virus interactions to conduct precision population health studies. Working on respiratory viral infections in cancer, including more than 50 publications on this topic, over the past decade has prepared her for the challenge to study the impact of COVID-19 and Cancer in TX. She currently leads a 120-cancer center strong COVID-19 and Cancer consortium (CCC19: https://ccc19.org/) in the capacity of a Steering Committee member by providing support, guidance and oversight of progress and strategic future directions for the consortium. She also leads the Epidemiology Core and Committee to provide expertise on the COVID19 in Cancer research projects by supporting investigators in designing innovative and methodologically robust studies to understand the impact of COVID-19 on cancer patients. In this role, she has authored more than 7 high-impact publications (Lancet, Cancer Discovery, Cancer Cell, etc.), 10 late-breaking abstracts and oral presentations (ASCO, ASH, AACR, ESMO), and is currently involved in 20 ongoing clinical research projects focused on COVID-19 and Cancer. Her COVID-19 research has received more than 400 citations and covered by more than 100 media outlets including CNN, AP, NY times, and American Cancer Society Podcast. She also co-leads the patient advocacy committee for CCC19 to improve accessibility and enhance patient engagement and interaction with the consortium. She is also the site PI for  NCI's longitudinal cohort study - NCCAPS - to understand the natural history of COVID-19 in patients with cancer. 



Speaker
Special Session
"Regulatory Insights to the 2021 Early Stage Breast Cancer Approval"

Mirat Shah, MD MHS
Medical Oncologist
Food and Drug Administration

Mirat Shah, MD, MHS is a medical oncologist on the breast, gynecologic, and supportive oncology team within the Office of Oncologic Diseases at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. She completed her internal medicine residency at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and her medical oncology fellowship at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, including one year as chief fellow. She also obtained a master’s degree in health sciences through the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her interests include improving palliative and supportive care for patients with cancer and she maintains a supportive oncology clinic at Johns Hopkins. 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Genomic and transcriptomic landscape of TNBC"

Zhi-Ming Shao, MD
Chairman, Department of Breast Surgery
Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center

Prof. Shao Zhimin, distinguished professor of Fudan University, is one of the first batch of distinguished professor of Chang Jiang Scholars. He presently serves as the director of Fudan University Cancer Institute and Breast Cancer Institute; chairman of Department of Surgery and Department of Breast Surgery in Fudan University Cancer Hospital; Honorary chairman of Breast Cancer Society, Chinese Anti-Cancer Association; Vice chairman of oncology branch committee, Chinese Medical Association; Honorary chairman of Breast Cancer Society, Shanghai Anti-Cancer Association; Chairman of oncology branch committee, Shanghai Medical Association; Chairman of the Eighth Asian Breast Cancer Society, and member of the St. Gallen international breast cancer consensus panel. Prof. Shao engages in clinical and basic research for breast cancer. He established an early screening and diagnosis process for the Chinese population, investigated molecular subtyping of triple-negative breast cancer, and carried out clinical trials to improve the prognosis of breast cancer patients. His researches mainly focus on breast cancer translational research and mechanisms of metastasis of breast cancer. He has published nearly 500 papers about breast cancer research, and over 400 of which are indexed by SCI, including Cancer Cell, J Clin Oncol and JAMA Oncol, and have been cited for more than 6000 times by the world’s medical literature. Dr. Shao has been awarded with Prize of Science and Technology Progress of Ministry of Health, Grade I; Prize of Science and Technology Progress of Shanghai Government, Grade I, II and III; National Prize of Science and Technology Progress, Grade II; and Prize of Science and Technology Progress of Ministry of Education, Grade I, II. He was chosen as leader of selected innovative team of the Ministry of Education, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Breast Malignancy Tumor, Shanghai Municipal Health Commission Type B Program of the Priority Project of Clinical Medical Centers, and the Shanghai Joint Research Project of Major Diseases. He hosted and actualized in over 30 key research projects including National Excellent Youth Foundation, National Science Foundation, Key Project of National 10th 5-year Plan, Priority project on clinical medicine of Ministry of Health, 211 Project phase II, 985 Project, 973 Project, and other provincial or ministerial projects.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 8
"HER2 Positive Breast Cancer"

Priyanka Sharma, MD
Professor of Medicine
The University of Kansas

Dr. Priyanka Sharma is a Professor of Medicine at the University of Kansas Medical Center and assistant director of clinical research and co-program leader for the Drug Discovery, Delivery andamp; Experimental Therapeutics program at the University of Kansas Cancer Center. She is the institutional principal investigator for South West Oncology Group (SWOG) and co-PI for MCA-KUCC NCORP grant.Dr. Sharma received her medical degree from MS University of Baroda, India and proceeded to complete Internal Medicine residency, chief residency, and Hematology-Oncology fellowship at the University of Kansas Medical Center. Her research interests include clinical and translational research in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and novel treatment strategies for metastatic breast cancer.Dr. Sharma is recipient of several grants including American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Advanced Clinical Research Award, Mary-Kay Foundation grant and is principle investigator of several ongoing clinical trials with targeted agents.Dr. Sharma is Vice-Chair of the South West Oncology Group (SWOG) Breast Committee, member of SWOG Board of Governors and member of NCI breast cancer steering committee.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 10
"Novel Immunotherapy Approaches"

Rebecca Shatsky, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
University of California, San Diego

Rebecca Shatsky is a board-certified medical oncologist who specializes in treating breast cancer. She is part of UC SanDiego Health's Precision Immunotherapy clinic. Dr. Shatsky Teaches medical students, residents and fellows at UC SanDiego School of Medicine. She conducts clinical and translational breast cancer resarch at Moores Cancer Center at UCSan Diego Health. She is the principal investigator of many clinical trials and is part of the national clinical operationsleadership for teh I-SPY 2 trial. Her translational research focuses on the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer adn isfunded by multiple sources, including grants from the California Insitute for the Advancement of Precision Medicine and theBreast Cancer Research Foundation. She is a member of the NCCN guideline panel for Genetic/High Risk Assessment ofBreast, Ovarian and Pancreatic Cancer and the panel for the treatment of Cancer Associated Pain. Dr. Shatsky completedher Hematology-Oncology fellowship at UC San Diego School of Medicine. She completed an Internal Medicine residencyat UCLA David Geffin School of Medicine and completed medical school at the University of Southern California, KeckSchool of Medicine. She is a recent reciepient of the UC San Diego Hematology-Oncology Fellowship's Excellence inOncology Teaching Award and a two time San Diego Physcian of Exceptional Excellence Award recipient.



Speaker
Special Session
"Predictors of biospecimen donation in the Black Women’s Health Study"

Vanessa B. Sheppard, PhD
Professor
Virginia Commonwealth University

Vanessa B. Sheppard is a population scientist focused on reducing cancer disparities. Her research program centers on understanding and improving adherence to evidence-based medical therapies and developing interventions to promote the uptake of these therapies and/or lifestyle behaviors. Her research program centers primarily on breast cancer and emphasis patient-oriented studies. Mentoring and training future scientists in the biomedical research workforce have been central in her career. She has focused on mentoring trainees from diverse backgrounds with an emphasis on individuals from underrepresented racial/ethnic minority groups. Her roles at the Massey Cancer Center (MCC) integrate key areas of her research expertise and experience. As the Associate Director for Community Outreach Engagement and Health Disparities at the MCC, she leads a university-wide disparities research initiative across center programs and within various research themes (e.g., precision medicine). Her interdisciplinary training in the fields of health services research, epidemiology, community health, and urban sociology lends an interdisciplinary lens to her scholarship and leadership. This educational preparation is complemented with rigorous training in behavioral science and clinical patient-oriented methodologies. She has prioritized research efforts in racial/ethnic groups including Latinas, African Americans, and African-born women. She has successfully engaged participants in clinically-oriented research to address health disparities, health-related outcomes, and barriers to care. Dr. Sheppard has peer-reviewed publications (>120) in relevant journals such as Cancer, Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. and has been continuously funded and she is currently leading federal and foundation funded research projects focused on reducing disparities in risk assessment and breast cancer treatment for African American women. In addition to receipt of funding for her research lab, she co-leads a T32 training program, serves as a consultant for the CISNET breast cancer group and co-chair for the Alliance disparities committee. Taken together, she has the training, skill, and expertise to present scholarship relevant to engaging diverse individuals in research for the proposed panel.



Speaker 
Educational Session
"What does diet and exercise change really do for you"

Nicole Simone, MD
Professor and Vice Chair of Research and Faculty Development
Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Thomas Jefferson University

Dr. Simone is an expert in modulating systemic inflammation to improve cancer outcomes via dietary modifications. Her bench to bedside and back approach allows for novel discoveries that are easily translated to the clinic. Her research interest is to change the landscape of cancer care by empowering patients to use dietary interventions to improve outcomes. The overarching goal of my laboratory is to increase sensitivity of tumors with a poor response to standard therapies. To accomplish this, the lab uses diet to alter cell metabolism via signaling pathways to increase cancer cells’ vulnerability to cytotoxic therapy. Through our studies, we have found new methods for treating tumors, which has led to the development of innovative clinical trials.

Dr. Simone is the Leader of the Cancer Risk and Control Program for the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and the Margaret Q. Landenberger Endowed Professor and Vice Chair of Radiation Oncology at Thomas Jefferson University. She has had considerable experience in translational research, medical treatment, education and training. She has experience taking laboratory based research to the clinic, identifying clinical observations and going back to the laboratory to investigate further. She joined the Jefferson faculty as Assistant Professor after a position as an Assistant Clinical Investigator at the National Cancer Institute.

Dr. Simone's laboratory has contributed significantly to studying regulation of microRNAs and the downstream effects of microRNAs on cell metabolism via dietary alterations. Her laboratory demonstrated for the first time that caloric restriction (CR) modifies microRNA expression (Ørom et al., Cell Cycle, 2012). The Simone laboratory then explored the physiologic impact of CR and demonstrated that CR can augment radiation therapy (Saleh et al., Cell Cycle, 2013), which she then translated directly into a clinical trial using diet during radiation for early stage breast cancer patients (NCT01819233). The lab found the same improved physiologic response of the primary tumor in vivo when CR was combined with chemotherapy, which was translated directly to a clinical trial (NCT02827370). Dr. Simone’s laboratory also investigated the role of microRNAs in the ability of CR to decrease metastatic disease burden via control of the ECM (Jin et al., Breast Cancer Res Treat, 2014; Simone et al., Cell Cycle, 2016). These findings led to her third IIT in which diet modulation prior to definitive oncologic surgery for patients with endometrial, prostate, and breast cancer will be evaluated to favorably alter expression of microRNAs as drivers of cancer progression (NCT02983279). The primary endpoint of this clinical trial is to use biomarkers to demonstrate we are able to change the systemic inflammation in our patient population by assessing their miR-21. We have matched tissue before and after diet in the breast cancer patients on this trial and will be analyzing it as part of this proposal. Finally, we have created a novel model (miR-21 knockout murine model) and have demonstrated its unique phenotype of both radiation sensitivity in vivo (Puccetti et al., IJROBP 2019) and role in cancer initiation and metastases (Dan et al., Cancers 2021).

In her role as Leader of the Cancer Risk and Control program, she has placed significant effort into community outreach by educating populations at risk in our catchment area including our elderly, African American, LGBTQ and Asian American community. This effort has allowed her to be personally involved in health disparities issues and she is eager to apply the research in my laboratory to trying to narrow these disparities.



Co-Chair 
Spotlight Session 11
"The future is Now: Innovation in Pathology and Radiology"

Kalliopi P. Siziopikou, MD, PhD
Professor of Pathology
Northwestern University

Dr. Siziopikou is Professor of Pathology, the Director of Breast Pathology and the Director of the Breast Pathology  Fellowship Program at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive  Cancer Center in Chicago, IL. Dr. Siziopikou received her MD degree from Aristotelian University School of Medicine in  Thessaloniki Greece in 1985 and her PhD degree in Immunology from Rush University in Chicago, IL in 1990. She  subsequently completed her residency in Anatomic Pathology at Beth Israel Hospital/Harvard Medical School and her  fellowship in Breast Pathology at the Beth Israel Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute, in Boston, MA. Dr. Siziopikou is a  diplomat of the American Board of Pathology. Before joining Northwestern, Dr. Siziopikou was the Director of Breast  Pathology at Loyola University Medical Center in Chicago (1998-2003) and subsequently at Rush University Medical Center  in Chicago (2003-2009). Dr. Siziopikou is active in a number of professional organizations including the American Association for Cancer Research  (AACR), Women in Cancer Research, the College of American Pathologists (CAP), the US and Canadian Academy of  Pathology (USCAP), the Massachusetts Medical Society, the Chicago Pathology Society, the International Society of  Breast Pathology and the Breast Committee and Working group of the NSABP/NRG Oncology national cooperative group.  Dr. Siziopikou is the author of over 60 original peer-reviewed articles and over 110 peer-reviewed published abstracts. She  has lectured extensively on Breast Pathology at numerous conferences nationally and internationally. Dr. Siziopikou's subspecialty focus is on breast tumor markers and molecular diagnostics in breast cancer. Her current  research interests center around molecular markers of prognostic and predictive significance in breast cancer, delineation  of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of triple negative and HER2 positive breast cancer, mechanisms of  tumor progression from preinvasive to invasive carcinoma and immuno-oncology biomarkers in breast cancer. Dr. Siziopikou is the pathologist co-investigator on the NSABP B43 study. She is also a member of the United States and  Canadian Academy of Pathology (USCAP) and the College of American Pathologists (CAP) Abstract Review Board, a  member of the Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium Scientific Planning Committee, an Editorial Board member of Breast  Cancer Research and Treatment and a Section Editor for Breast Pathology at the Editorial Board of the Archives of  Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, among other appointments. From 2015-present Dr. Siziopikou serves as a San  Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium Abstract Selection Committee member. She was also a member of the 2016, 2017 and  2020 SABCS Program Planning Committee and from 2017-present a San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS)  Program Planning Committee, Chairs Panel Member.



Speaker
Special Session
"Health equity in cancer care and clinical trials (addressing workforce, leadership, etc.)"

Melissa Simon, MD MPH
Professor, Vice Chair of Research and Center Director
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center

Melissa A. Simon, MD MPH  is the George H. Gardner Professor of Clinical Gynecology, Vice Chair of Research in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. She is also the Founder and Director of the Center for Health Equity Transformation and the Chicago Cancer Health Equity Collaborative and the Co-Program Leader for Cancer Control and Survivorship for the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center.

She is an expert in implementation science, women’s health across the lifespan, minority health, community engagement and health equity.  She has been recognized with numerous awards for her substantial contribution to excellence in health equity scholarship, women’s health and mentorship, including the Presidential Award in Excellence in Science Mathematics and Engineering Mentorship and a Presidential Leadership Scholar. She is a former member and current consultant to the US Preventive Services Task Force and serves on the NIH Office of Research in Women’s Health Advisory Committee. She is also a member of the National Academy of Medicine’s Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, the Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the NAM Leadership Consortium’s Culture Inclusion and Equity Collaborative. 



Speaker
Workshop
"How to present clinical research results effectively"

George W. Sledge, MD
Professor of Medicine
Stanford University

Dr. George W. Sledge, Jr. is Professor of Medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine where he serves as a member of the Division of Oncology. From 2013-2020 he served as Chief of the Division of Oncology and is currently co-director of the Stanford Cancer Institute’s Cancer Therapeutics Program.  Trained in Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology, he has devoted his professional career to understanding the biology and improving the treatment of breast cancer. He is active as both a laboratory and clinical researcher, with more than 390 scientific publications. He served as chair of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group’s Breast Cancer Committee (2003-2010), as a member of the Food and Drug Administration’s Oncology Drug Advisory Committee, and as a member of the Department of Defense’s Breast Cancer Research Program’s Integration Panel as well as the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Trails Advisory Board. He is Past President of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and currently serves as the Chief Scientific Advisor for the Susan G. Komen Foundation and as a member of the scientific advisory board for the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation. He is the recipient of numerous scientific awards, including the Breast Cancer Research Foundation’s Jill Rose Award, the Komen Foundation’s Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction, the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium’s William L. McGuire Award and the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s Gianni Bonadonna Award. His research interests have focused on novel biologic approaches to breast cancer therapy.   



Panel Member
Special Session
"Trust in Science and Healthcare"

Na'Diah L. Smith, MBA, CSM, SA
ANGEL Advocate and Trainer
Tigerlily Foundation

A native of Jackson, Mississippi, Na'Diah graduated from Xavier University of Louisiana with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Administration with a concentration in Marketing. She also obtained a Master of Business Administration from Jackson State University. She resides in Glenn Heights, TX, and is currently a Sr. Associate, Management Consultant at KPMG.

With a flourishing corporate career and in the best physical shape of her life, her world suddenly changed on March 28, 2016.  At the age of 33, Na'Diah was diagnosed with Breast Cancer, Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).

Na'Diah's journey revealed her passion and true purpose. She’s evolved from simply surviving to thriving by becoming a Breast Cancer patient advocate and promoting awareness through speaking engagements, social media, radio and television broadcast, involvement in organizations and initiatives such as the 2021 For the Breast of Us BCAM Baddies #whenyouseeus campaign forcing a new narrative for young, diagnosed women of color. She is also featured in the FTBOU acclaimed book, In One Word, asking WOC to define their breast cancer experience in one word. Na'Diah appeared in Ulta Beauty stores nationwide in 2019 and 2020 as a spotlighted thriver in the Gorgeous Way to Give campaign in partnership with BCRF. In addition to her work with For the Breast of Us and Ulta Beauty, she has participated in the Susan G Komen survivor stories spotlight, is a member of Sisters Network of Dallas, and was named 2019 Glamorous Conquer by the Pink Peppermint Project. She currently serves as an ANGEL advocate, Clinical Trials Advisory Committee (CTAC) member, and Trainer for Tigerlily Foundation as well as a For the Breast of Us Baddie Ambassador (Early-stage cancer patient advocate).

Na'Diah strives to use her voice to bring awareness to a disease impacting Women of Color at disproportionate rates, stand in the gap for young women diagnosed under the age of 40 as proof Breast Cancer does not discriminate, expose healthcare and health disparities impacting underrepresented demographics and educate our communities.



Speaker
Clinical Research Workshop
"How to include patient advocates in clinical research"

Co-Moderator
Special Session
"Health Equity in Translational Research Studies"

Patricia Spears, BS
Research Patient Advocate
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Patty Spears provides scientific leadership and guidance to advance OCTR translational trials and data management of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology breast cancer research trials. Patty also provides advocacy leadership for UNC Lineberger, including leadership of the Patient Advocates for Research Council and is a part of the Office of Community Outreach and Engagement. Patty hopes to combine her scientific research and patient research advocacy experience to have an impact on the local and national fight against breast cancer.



Speaker 
Educational Session
"Hypnosis and mindfulness"

David Spiegel, MD
Willson Professor and Associate Chair of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
Stanford University School of Medicine

Dr. David Spiegel is Willson Professor and Associate Chair of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, and Director of the Center on Stress and Health and the Center for Integrative Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.  He has published thirteen books, 409 scientific journal articles, and 175 book chapters on hypnosis, psychosocial oncology, stress physiology, trauma, and psychotherapy for stress, anxiety, and depression.   His research has been supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute on Aging, the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, and a number of foundations.  He was a member of the work groups on stressor and trauma-related disorders for the DSM-IV and DSM-5. He is Past President of the American College of Psychiatrists and the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, and is a Member of the National Academy of Medicine.  He spoke on hypnosis at the World Economic Forum in Davos in January, 2018.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 4
"Brain Metastases: Managing LMD / Targeting HER2"

Patricia S. Steeg, PhD
Deputy Chief, Women's Malignancies Branch
National Cancer Institute

Dr. Patricia S. Steeg is a Principal Investigator and an Associate Director in the Center for Cancer Research (CCR), National Cancer Institute (NCI).  She also serves as Deputy Chief of CCR’s Women’s Malignancies Branch. Her career has been dedicated to understanding the mechanisms of breast cancer metastasis, and bringing these findings forward to the patient. Dr. Steeg’s initial research identified the first metastasis suppressor gene, nm23 (NME).  The rising incidence of brain metastases of breast cancer, and their severe neurocognitive sequelae prompted Dr. Steeg to initiate a new program to obtain mechanistic and translational insights into this dreaded complication. She has investigated the composition of the blood-tumor barrier and collaboratively determined its permeability to drugs. Her preclinical data identified low dose, metronomic temozolomide as a potent prevention agent for brain metastases. Based on this work, the NCI has opened a Phase I/II randomized secondary prevention trial of T-DM1 +/- temozolomide for HER2+ patients.  Dr. Steeg serves as Co-Director of the Office of Translational Resources for CCR, NCI. She has won numerous awards including the Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction from the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation, the Kurt Helman Translational Research Award from the Metastasis Research Society, and the Charlotte Friend Award from AACR. 



Speaker
Basic Workshop
"In silico experimentation from your living room: Tools to access and analyze existing datasets"

Daniel G. Stover, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine & Biomedical Informatics
Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center

Dr. Daniel Stover is an Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine in the Division of Medical Oncology and Department of Biomedical Informatics at Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center. His research focus is clinical computational oncology – the application of computational approaches to leverage the immense available and potential data from tumor genomic profiling and high dimensional data to improve outcomes for patients with cancer. By working at the intersection of computational biology and clinical oncology, he seeks to bridge the gap between discovery genomics and patient care. In parallel, he cares for patients with breast cancer at the Stefanie Spielman Comprehensive Breast Center. Dr. Stover serves as Vice Chair of the Breast Committee of NCTN cooperative group Alliance for Clinical Trials, actively collaborating on correlative studies, including biomarker identification and genomic/transcriptional analyses.

Dr. Stover is a cum laude graduate of Princeton University and received his M.D. from Vanderbilt University where he was named to AOA Honor Medical Society. Dr. Stover did his residency in internal medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and was selected to serve as the Hugh J. Morgan Chief Resident in Medicine. He completed his fellowship in Medical Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Cancer Center program then completed postdoctoral research with Joan Brugge, PhD and at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT. Dr. Stover has received the Patricia Glickman Prize and the Arthur Lane Citizen-Athlete Award from Princeton University; the Albert Weinstein Prize in Medicine and the Award of Distinction from Vanderbilt School of Medicine; the Holt Young Physician Leadership Award from the Southern Medical Association; the President’s Prize in Value-Based Healthcare Delivery from Partner’s Healthcare; the 'Physician Champion of Nursing' from Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center; and a Merit Award from the Conquer Cancer Foundation of ASCO. Dr. Stover is the founding member of the Student-Resident section of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and currently serves on ASCO’s Membership Committee.



Panel Member
Special Session
"Trust in Science and Healthcare"

Erica Stringer-Reasor, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Erica Stringer-Reasor, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Director of the Breast Cancer Program at The University of Alabama at Birmingham O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center. She received her undergraduate degree at Auburn University and her doctorate in medicine from the University of South Alabama College of Medicine in Mobile, followed by an internship in Internal Medicine at Tulane University Hospital in New Orleans, Louisiana, and a residency in Internal Medicine at Baptist Health System in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. Stringer-Reasor subsequently completed fellowships in Medical Hematology/Oncology and Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics at The University of Chicago in Illinois. She is board-certified in Internal Medicine, with subspecialty certifications in Hematology and Medical Oncology. In September 2015, she joined the faculty at the University of Alabama. Her research focus remains on developing novel targeted therapies to treat aggressive subtypes of breast cancer including human epidermal growth factor receptor positive (HER2+) and triple-negative (ER-/PR-/HER2-) by designing clinical trials that translate laboratory findings. She continues to partner with a number of breast cancer specific lab-based and clinician-scientists to improve efficacy in drug development, clinical trial design, pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) analysis, cancer genetics, early detection, and most importantly patient care. National Institute of Health, Susan G. Komen Career, Victory Foundation, and Breast Cancer Research Foundation of Alabama have supported her research and her work has been published in such peer-reviewed journals as JAMA Oncology, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Breast Cancer Research, and Gynecologic Oncology.



Panel Member
Special Session
"Trust in Science and Healthcare"

Deborah Stroman, PhD
Associate Professor 
University of North Carolina



Co-Chair
Spotlight Session 9
"Evaluating Emerging and Established Biomarkers"

W. Fraser Symmans, MB.ChB
Professor of Pathology and Translational Molecular Pathology
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Fraser Symmans is Professor and Director of Research Operations in the Department of Pathology at MD Anderson Cancer Center, where he practices Breast Surgical Pathology and Cytopathology. He also leads a research program in Breast Cancer Pharmacogenomics within the Department of Translational Molecular Pathology.

He received his medical degree from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, completed his residency at Columbia University, New York, and fellowship at MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston. Dr. Symmans joined the faculty of New York University Medical Center in 1993 and later moved to MD Anderson Cancer Center in 2000.

Dr. Symmans’ research is focused on breast cancer, with specific emphasis on neoadjuvant (pre-operative) treatment trials for evaluation of chemosensitivity and endocrine sensitivity, assessment of response to treatment and development of diagnostic tests to select the most effective treatments for individuals with breast cancer. His other major research focus is addressing the effects of biopsy sample quality on genomic test results in order to establish appropriate best practices for clinical diagnostic use, particularly with small clinical biopsies and addressing pre-analytical and analytical factors in test development.

His additional responsibilities include: Director of Translational Research Program and Executive Committee Member for The Alliance for Clinical Trials and Alliance Foundation Trials, Steering Committee Member for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium. 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Reclassifying VUS: New techniques can solve the puzzle once and for all"

Sean V. Tavtigian, PhD
Professor
University of Utah and Huntsman Cancer Institute

Dr Sean V. Tavtigian is a Professor of Oncological Sciences at the University of Utah School of Medicine and an Investigator at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, where he holds a Jon and Karen Huntsman Presidential Endowed Chair in Cancer Research.  He received a BA in biology and chemistry from Pomona College in 1984 and then a PhD in molecular biology and biochemistry from the California Institute of Technology in 1992.

From 1993 until 2002, Dr Tavtigian worked at Myriad Genetics, a biotechnology company located in Salt Lake City.  At Myriad, he progressed from postdoctoral fellow through several promotions to Vice President of Cancer Genetics Research.  During that time, he contributed to projects including the characterization and/or discovery of the cancer susceptibility genes CDKN2A, BRCA1, BRCA2, and PTEN (the latter with Peter Steck from MDACC).

In late 2002, Dr Tavtigian moved to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), located in Lyon, France.  At IARC, which is the cancer research arm of the World Health Organization, he was the Head of the Genetic Cancer Susceptibility Group.  While there, he developed one of the leading models for in silico analysis of missense substitutions.  In 2008, Dr Tavtigian convened an IARC Working Group on unclassified sequence variants in cancer susceptibility genes; that meeting led to publication of a highly influential set of 10 papers in the November, 2008 issue of Human Mutation, including a key paper on recommendations for interpretation of genetic test results.

In late 2009, Dr Tavtigian moved to the University of Utah’s Huntsman Cancer Institute where he is now Director of their Center for Cancer Genetics.  His current interests include (1) analysis of unclassified sequence variants observed during clinical testing of high-risk cancer susceptibility genes, (2) massively parallel sequencing-driven cancer susceptibility gene discovery and analysis efforts, and (3) a new project examining the potential for interaction between pathogenic alleles of susceptibility genes, exposure to ionizing radiation, and cancer risk.  Related to area #1 and this talk, Dr Tavtigian recently fitted the entire American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG) sequence variant classification system into a quantitative Bayesian framework, and then derived a mathematically sound points-system for variant classification from that framework.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Management of special subtypes of TNBC"

Alexandra Thomas, MD
Williams Family Professor in Breast Oncology
Wake Forest University School of Medicine

With regard to continuing medical education, Dr. Alexandra Thomas has provided dozens of lectures at the local, regional and national level. Most recently at the national level, she provided a talk for the Educational Program for the ASCO 2020 Annual Meeting. This talk was entitled: “What’s the Price? The Toxicity of Novel Therapies for Breast Cancer.” She also chaired this session. Dr. Thomas has moderated multiple sessions for ASCO, served as a Discussant and presented and Oral Abstract at the Annual Meeting. She has presented a discussion on “Can Metastatic Breast Cancer be Cured” to the North Carolina Oncology Association. Locally, she has presented twice in the last several years at the annual Spurr Symposium.

Dr. Thomas lectures regularly to fellows and residents. In 2005, while at the University of Iowa she was selected to be a Teaching Scholar, which provided a year of intense training in teaching, including on delivering lectures. Finally, while at Iowa she was also selected for a program entitled, “New Technologies in the Learning Environment”. This program in addition to providing education on newer technologies and teaching, provided a small grant.



Panel Member
View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?

Alastair Thompson, BSc(Hons), MBChB, MD, FRCSEd, FACS
Professor of Surgery
Baylor College of Medicine

Over the last 35 years, Alastair Thompson has trained and practiced as a clinician-scientist focused on multidisciplinary patient care alongside translational “bench to bedside” studies and innovative clinical trials in cancer. He has initiated and lead a successful breast cancer laboratory program, has provided leadership for a cancer center in the United Kingdom (UK), chaired the UK national breast cancer trials portfolio of 120 studies and engaged in a range of pivotal roles in key drug, radiation therapy and surgical trials involving the UK, Europe (through the EORTC and BIG), the United States and Australia.

Since moving to the US in 2014, he has specialized in improving treatment for breast cancer patients with innovative localization techniques for breast conservation and axillary node surgery and to minimize patient impact through to skin sparing and nipple sparing mastectomy with autologous reconstruction where required.

Unusual for a surgeon, he has preclinical and practical experience in the design, implementation, monitoring and reporting of early through to late phase drug and medical device trials. Recent pharmaceutical experience includes active leadership of international trials such as the SOLE, MA32, MINDACT, and KRISTINE trials; he currently chairs several phase II and phase III data monitoring committees and trials steering groups. For radiotherapy, he co-authored the ASTRO ABPI consensus guidelines and has contributed to intraoperative and hypofractionation trials.

Since transitioning to the US, national leadership roles include co-chairing the Comparison of Operative to Monitoring and Endocrine Therapy (COMET) Trial for low risk DCIS, co-chairing the NCI-BCSC proposed “no surgery” clinical trial planning committee and membership of the NCI BOLD taskforce alongside leadership positions within the TBCRC (Loco-regional Subgroup co-Chair) and SWOG (Translational Medicine Breast Group Chair). He is an active member of ASCO, SSO, ASBrS and AACR.

With successful peer reviewed funding from US government and international charitable sources linking laboratory to clinical studies, successful supervision of 24 postgraduate students and over 350 peer reviewed publications in the highest impact factor clinical and scientific journals, improving care of those with cancer remains his key mission.



Speaker 
Basic Science Forum
"A new perspective on androgen receptor action in estrogen receptor-α positive breast cancer"

Wayne Tilley, PhD
Director, Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories
University of Adelaide

Wayne Tilley is Director of the Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories, Adelaide Medical School, Adelaide Health and Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide (2002-current). His career has spanned 35 years in Australia, the USA (UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas TX; Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA) and the UK (CRUK Cambridge Institute). He cloned the human androgen receptor (AR) at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas in the 1980s and on return to Australia in the early 1990's, he established an internationally recognized research program on sex steroid action in hormone-dependent cancers, with a particular focus on breast and prostate cancer. He also established the Flinders Cancer Centre in the mid 1990’s. He has published over 235 peer-reviewed papers. His recent seminal papers demonstrated that the progesterone receptor is a critical regulator of estrogen receptor-α (ER) activity in breast cancer (Nature 2015) and that the AR is a tumor suppressor in ER+ breast cancer, with clear guidelines for exploiting AR activation therapeutically (Nature Medicine 2021). He has a track record of translating research into the clinic, with clinical trials of PR and AR activation in ER-driven disease ongoing. In recognition of his research excellence in the field of hormone-dependent cancers, in 2016 he received the Endocrine Society of Australia Senior Plenary Award and presented the opening plenary lecture at the International Congress of Endocrinology in Beijing. He convenes the International PacRim Breast and Prostate Cancer Meeting series.



Speaker
Translational Science Forum
"Heterogeneity in treatment outcomes for HER2+ breast cancer – Clinical management strategies"

Sara M. Tolaney, MD, MPH
Associate Professor of Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Tolaney received her undergraduate degree from Princeton University in 1998 and her medical degree from UC San Francisco in 2002. She subsequently completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins University, and fellowships in hematology and medical oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. She obtained a Masters in Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health in 2007. In 2008, she joined the staff of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, where she is a medical oncologist and clinical investigator in the Breast Oncology Center. Her research focuses on the development of novel therapies in the treatment of breast cancer.



Moderator
Educational Session
"The Fluid Landscape of Liquid Biopsy"

Nicholas Turner, PhD
Consultant Medical Oncologist
The Royal Marsden Hospital
Institute of Cancer Research

Professor Nicholas Turner is a Consultant Medical Oncologist who specialises in the treatment of breast cancer. He read Natural Sciences at Cambridge University before qualifying in 1997 from the University of Oxford Medical School. After completing general medical training in London, he trained in medical oncology at Royal Free and University College Hospitals and completed a PhD at The Institute of Cancer Research in 2006. He joined the Breast Unit of The Royal Marsden as a Consultant in Medical Oncology in 2008.

He is a Team Leader in Molecular Oncology at the Breast Cancer Now Research Centre at the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR). He is Genotyping, Phenotyping and Cancer Evolution Theme Lead for The Royal Marsden and ICR NIHR Biomedical Research Centre.

Professor Turner is the Breast Domain Lead of the Genomics England Clinical Interpretation Partnerships, and has co-chaired of the ASCO/CAP review committee on circulating tumor DNA analysis in patients with cancer. He sits on the organising committees of many international conferences on breast cancer, was the executive chair of the IMPAKT 2015 breast cancer conference, and is a scientific editor of the journal Cancer Discovery. He is Chief Investigator of a number of national and international trials of precision therapy in breast cancer. His research interests include the development of new therapies for breast cancer and using liquid biopsies to deliver more precise treatment for breast cancer.



Speaker
Educational Session
"PARP for BRCA+ breast cancers"

Andrew Tutt, MB ChB, MRCP, FRCR, PhD
Head of Division of Breast Cancer Research
Institute of Cancer Research

Professor Andrew Tutt, one of the UK’s leading specialists at running clinical trials of targeted therapies for breast cancer, has been appointed as Director of the Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Centre at The Institute of Cancer Research, London. 

Professor Tutt will work as Centre Director while maintaining his roles as Director of the Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Unit at King’s College London and Consultant Oncologist at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust - linking Breakthrough and The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) with these prestigious institutions. 

As a consultant oncologist and leading researcher, Professor Tutt’s work is led by the needs of breast cancer patients.  His research primarily focuses on the discovery of new treatments for some of the most hard-to-treat forms of breast cancer – those known as triple negative – which do not respond to hormonal therapies or HER2 targeted drugs.

One of Professor Tutt’s biggest achievements to date has been his role, alongside Professor Alan Ashworth – Chief Executive of the ICR and a former Director of the Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Centre – in the development of a new class of drugs known as PARP inhibitors, designed for use in patients with genetic forms of breast cancer. 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Artificial intelligence in radiology"

Gopal R. Vijayaraghavan, MD, MPH
Director Breast Imaging
University of Massachusetts Medical Health Services

Dr. Gopal Vijayaraghavan is a Board Certified practising radiologist and fellowship trained breast imager working at the UMass Medical School for the last 15 years. His initial medical schooling and residencies in diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology were from premier institutes in India. After nearly 25 years of clinical practice in India, he migrated to the United States to pursue research and academic opportunities. He has some 25 peer reviewed journal publications and an equal number of poster presentations at national and international conferences.Last year he was awarded a 3 year grant by the Massachussetts Life Sciences, Women's health program to work on, "Improving breast cancer diagnosis using artificial intelligence in mammography screening". They are working on this project with their partners in Computer Science at the the Univ of Massachussetts , Boston and a local AI software company. A paper entitled, "Robust breast cancer detection in mammography and digital breast tomosynthesisusing an annotated-efficient deep learning approach", based on an initial research study they did with scientists from Deep Health was published in Nature Medicine 2021.  Lotter, W., Diab, A.R., Haslam, B. Kim J, Grisot G, Wu E, Wu K, Onieva JO, Boyer Y, Boxerman J, Wang M, Bandler M, Gopal Vijayaraghavan, Sorensen G. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-020-01174-9.

He is the lead PI at UMass for the TMIST Trial (ECOG-ACRIN and NCI sponsored, EA-1151). In addition Dr. Vijayaraghavan has also assisted as a co-investigator in the following R01 and R21 NIH grants:1. High-resolution low dose dedicated breast CT (R01 CA199044).  2. Reducing mastectomy rates in invasive lobular cancers using high-resolution 3D breast CT (R01 CA195512).  3. Quantitative breast cancer risk index from routine 3-D imaging (R21 CA176470)  



Panel Member
Clinical Case Discussion

Anne Vincent-Salomon, MD, PhD
Surgical Pathologist
Institut Curie

Anne Vincent-Salomon is a surgical pathologist, MD, PhD, head of the department of pathology-genetics and immunology, practicing at the Institut Curie since 1993. She obtained a MD degree from the University Paris VI and a PhD degree from Paris Sud University. Her domains of expertise is breast pathology. From 2003 to 2013, she was granted twice successively by the INSERM (INTERFACE) that enabled her to achieve her PhD thesis in Dr Delattre’s laboratory (INSERM U830). One of the first achievements was the identification and validation of a DNA based-prognostic signature for early small luminal HER2-neg breast carcinoma patients (Gravier et al, 2010; Vincent-Salomon et al, 2013). Her research activities aimed at better characterizing histological special subtypes of breast cancer in order to contribute to breast cancer taxonomy, which is important for prognostic and diagnostic purposes. In particular, she investigated the phenotypic/morphological characteristics of breast cancers such as lobular tumors, rare types of invasive tumors including medullary and micropapillary carcinomas, and DCIS tumors (ductal carcinomas in situ). Together with Dr Derksen (Utrecht) and Pr Desmedt (Leuven) she co-created the European Lobular Breast Cancer Consortium dedicated to Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinomas and she is part of the European COST Action 2020 (LOBSTER).

She is co-director of the post-educational course on Breast Pathology for pathologists of the French division of the International Academy of Pathology together with Drs Macgrogan and Arnould since 2004 (two courses per year). She is director of the international breast cancer course at the institute Curie, “From clinics to biology” for PhD, post-doc and MDs specialized in breast oncology. She gives lectures on breast cancers for Master 2 degree course at Paris Sud-Saclay university, for several educational programs of residents at the University of Paris (medical oncologist; medical and surgical gynecological residents). In 2003 and 2004, she participated to the Post-educational course at Harvard university course “Breast pathology: current concepts and controversies (directors Pr Stuart Schnitt and Laura Collins)” (lecture on Invasive lobular carcinomas).

She published 323 articles (PUBMED) (Vincent- Salomon A et alias : Salomon AV ; Salomon A). Her H-index Research Gate Score (May 2021) is 76 without auto-citations (H-Index 78) and her RG Score : 51,49. She is member of the editorial boards of NPJ Breast cancer, Breast Cancer Research, Frontiers in Science: Pathology.

Anne Vincent-Salomon received several national and regional scientific prices and awards among which the Pink Ribbon award in 2012 from Estee Lauder and Mari-Claire companies. She has been nominated Chevalier National de l’Ordre du Mérite of the French republic in 2016. Since 2013, she is the president of the Scientific committee of the Pink Ribbon (Estee Lauder and Marie-Claire; France). She is member of the scientific councils of the Institut de Cancérologie de l’Ouest (Nantes & Angers, France), the Centre Léon Bérard (Lyon, France) and the Institut Curie (Paris, France).



Speaker
Educational Session
"Approving new therapies"

Suparna Wedam, MD
Medical Officer 
Food and Drug Administration

Dr. Suparna Wedam is a Medical Officer and Breast Cancer Scientific Liaison at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Office of Oncologic Drugs. Dr. Wedam graduated magna cum laude from Northwestern University with a B.A. in economics and then earned her medical degree from Georgetown University with election to the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society.  She completed her internal medicine residency at Georgetown University Medical Center, where she was also a chief medical resident. Subsequently, she completed her medical oncology and hematology fellowship at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. Wedam remains clinically active, treating breast cancer patients at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. 



Moderator
Basic Workshop
"Basic Science for Breast Oncologists"

Alana L. Welm, PhD 
Professor and Senior Director of Basic Science
University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute

Dr. Welm received her undergraduate degree in Microbiology from the University of Montana.  She completed a PhD in Cell and Molecular Biology at Baylor College of Medicine under the supervision of Gretchen Darlington. She then went on to conduct postdoctoral training in J. Michael Bishop’s laboratory at the University of California, San Francisco, where her work focused on developing new models of breast cancer metastasis. Dr. Welm started her laboratory at the University of Utah’s Huntsman Cancer Institute in 2007, and was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure in 2013 and to full Professor in 2019. She now holds the Ralph E. and Willia T. Main Presidential Endowed Chair in Cancer Research and is Co-Director of the Cell Response and Regulation Program at Huntsman Cancer Institute. She is the PI on multiple grants from the National Cancer Institute and DOD, and has received DOD Era of Hope Scholar and Susan G. Komen Scholar awards. She serves on advisory boards for the PDX-Integrator Group (Cambridge, United Kingdom),  the J. Michael Bishop Institute for Cancer Research (Chengdu, China), the Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) Patient-Derived Xenograft and Advanced in vivo Models Core, the BCM SPORE, and the Indiana University Precision Health Initiative-Triple Negative Breast Cancer Center for Excellence.

The research in Dr. Welm’s laboratory is focused on solving the problem of breast cancer metastasis using in vivo modeling of mouse and human breast cancers. Dr. Welm’s group discovered that the Ron kinase pathway is an important facilitator of breast cancer metastasis through its unique dual function in tumor cells and in regulation of the host anti-tumor immune response. Current areas of research include (1) investigation of tumor-immune interactions in metastatic breast cancer; (2) pre-clinical and early clinical studies of Ron inhibitors in metastatic cancer; (3) discovering molecular mechanisms by which Ron kinases promote metastasis through cell-autonomous and non cell-autonomous pathways; and (4) refining “precision medicine” for metastatic breast cancer using functional assays in patient-derived breast tumor grafts, in collaboration with Dr. Bryan Welm and multiple breast cancer clinical colleagues.



Speaker
Educational Session
"RNA metabolism and splicing" 

Thomas (Trey) Westbrook, PhD 
Founder & Executive Director, Therapeutic Innovation Center (THINC)
Baylor College of Medicine

Thomas (Trey) Westbrook is a Professor in the Depts. of Molecular & Human Genetics (MHG) and Biochemistry & Molecular Biology (BMB) at Baylor College of Medicine.  His expertise is in developing genetic technologies (ex. genome-wide barcoded shRNA libraries, inducible in vivo shRNA systems, etc.), and leveraging these technologies to discover gene networks that govern breast cancer pathogenesis and therapeutic response, with an emphasis on triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC).  More than a decade ago, they developed the first barcoding approach for genetic screens in human cells, an approach that underpins most RNAi and CRISPR screening strategies in mammalian systems. Their team focuses on using genetics and other disciplines to identify new vulnerabilities of TNBC and translating these discoveries into therapeutic benefit for breast cancer patients.   Contributions to Science  1. Finding new vulnerabilities in cancers driven by common oncogenes In addition to promoting tumorigenesis, common oncogenes such as Myc and Ras also produce unique stresses in cancer cells, collectively termed “oncogenic stress”.  Consequently, cancer cells become dependent on pathways enabling them to tolerate this stress.  

A major goal in their laboratory is to systematically discover the stresses imposed by commonly mutated oncogenes as well as the pathways tumors require to tolerate these stresses.  Such “stress-support pathways” would be ideal therapeutic targets, because cancer cells (but not normal cells) become hyper-dependent on them for their growth and survival.  Recent studies from their group have uncovered potent stress support pathways for several classic oncogenes such as Myc that they and others have leveraged into new cancer therapies with academic and pharmaceutical collaborators.  Their long-term goal is to develop their understanding of how RNA processing is dysfunctional in cancer and translate these mechanistic discoveries into therapeutic hypotheses. 



Panel Member
Special Session
"Trust in Science and Healthcare" 

Aliya Whipple
Breast Cancer ANGEL Advocate
Tigerlily Foundation



Presenter - Con
Debate
"One Week of Whole Breast RT is the New Standard of Care"

Julia White, MD, FACR, FASTRO
Professor and Vice Chair Clinical Research
Stefanie Spielman Comprehensive Breast Center

Dr. Julia White is a board certified Radiation Oncologist with a clinical practice dedicated to breast cancer management. Her research focuses on the development and implementation of novel treatments for breast cancer patients. She has significant expertise in the development, execution, accrual, analysis and oversight of late phase clinical trials for breast cancer patients that has lead to her leadership in the National Cancer Institute Clinical Cooperative Group, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) as Chair of Breast Cancer Committee beginning in 2007, and since 2012 as Co-Chair of the Breast Cancer Committee for NRG Oncology in the National Clinical Trial Network (NCTN). Broadly, her research has focused on clinical trials aimed at improving outcomes for the Breast Cancer patients. By the development of novel radiation treatment methods using advanced technology through trials aimed at tailoring local regional treatment based on biology and stage of disease and by examining radiation in combination with novel agents. 

Her expertise in breast cancer has led to her involvement in developing and authoring multiple consensus statements on treatment and in particular the use of radiation therapy for breast cancer and to her being a member of National Cancer Institute (NCI) Breast Cancer Steering Committee, NCI Breast Oncology Local Therapy Task force, NCI immunotherapy in Breast Cancer Working Group and a Susan G. Komen Scientific Scholar. 

Throughout her career she has been dedicated to providing training in clinical research and supporting students, trainees, and junior faculty to succeed as clinician investigators. From 1991 - 2008 she was PI and program director on a R25E supported a Medical Student Short Term Cancer Research Program at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW). She chaired the RTOG New Investigators Committee from 1997-2012 that provided New Investigators with mentorship, training on concept development, and access to committees of interest. She has been active in American Association of Cancer Education (AACE) to advance cancer education and training nationally and ultimately becoming president of this organization.  She remains a member of the Education Committee for American Society of Clinical Oncology(ASCO) and the American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). 



Panel Member
Clinical Case Discussion

Lee G. Wilke, MD
Surgical Oncologist
University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center

Dr. Lee G. Wilke; the Hendricks endowed chair in Breast Cancer Research is a tenured Professor of Surgery, the Associate Director for Clinical Research for the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center as well as the Director of the UW Health Breast Center in Madison, WI.  Dr Wilke is currently the Vice-Chair of Research for the UW Department of Surgery, chair of the Research committee for the American Society of Breast Surgeons as well as member of the Board of Directors for the Alliance for Clinical Trials and NCCN. She is the Principal Investigator for the University of Wisconsin NCTN LAPs grant and works locally and nationally to provide innovative device and pharmaceutical clinical trials for cancer patients.  In addition to caring for patients with breast cancer and helping advance cancer clinical trials, Dr Wilke enjoys traveling with her husband and 2 adult sons.



Speaker
Special Session
Trust in Science and Healthcare

Lori L. Wilson, MD
Associate Professor
Howard University College of Medicine

Dr. Lori Wilson is the division chief of surgical oncology, which focuses on health disparities in underrepresented populations as well as breast, colorectal, and endocrine cancers. She is also the program director of the general surgery residency at Howard University Hospital. She is a graduate of Georgetown University School of Medicine and completed an internship and residency in general surgery at Howard University Hospital. During this time, she was honored with the university’s Chairman’s Award, the Resident’s Choice Award from the Department of Surgery, and was inducted into Alpha Omega Alpha, Gamma Chapter, Medical Honor Society, along with other honors. In addition, she completed a research fellowship at the University of Cincinnati with advanced coursework in cellular biology, molecular genetics, and bioethics. At the John Wayne Cancer Institute, she was honored as Chief Administrative Surgical Oncology Fellow, along with many other academic accolades.



Panel Member
Special Session
"Trust in Science and Healthcare"

Eric P. Winer, MD
Director, Breast Cancer Program
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Eric P. Winer is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Chief Clinical Development Officer, SVP for Medical Affairs, and Chief, Division of Breast Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.  He is also Director of the Breast Oncology Program and the Thompson Chair in Breast Cancer Research.  He divides his time between clinical work, clinical research, and administration.  

Since he joined the Harvard faculty in 1997, Dr. Winer has mentored over 30 fellows and junior faculty, many of whom have gone on to assume positions in major cancer academic cancer centers.  From 2003 through 2016, he was the co-chair of the Breast Committee for the Alliance for Clinical Trials and serves as the co-chair of the NCI Breast Cancer Steering Committee that oversees the breast cancer clinical trials sponsored by the NCI.  he is also the leader of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center Breast SPORE.

Broadly defined, the focus of his research has been on improving the clinical care of women with breast cancer.  Dr. Winer has approached this task with a collaborative spirit, and has worked closely with colleagues in basic science, translational medicine, biostatistics, health services research, clinical oncology, and psychosocial research.  he has conducted a wide array of Phase I, II, and III clinical trials in patients with breast cancer.  These trials have addressed all of the major biologic subtypes and all stages of the disease.  



Speaker
Educational Session
"Axillary management in upfront surgery - staging, local control or both?"

Stephanie M. Wong, MD MPH
Assistant Professor 
McGill University Medical School

Stephanie Wong, MD. MPH. is an assistant professor of surgery at McGill Medical School and a breast surgical oncologist at the JGH Segal Cancer Centre in Montreal, Canada. She received her medical degree and completed general surgery residency at McGill University, her MPH at the Harvard School of Public Health, and in 2019, completed a breast surgical oncology fellowship at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Centre and Massachusetts General Hospital. Her clinical and research interests focus on surgical outcomes following neoadjuvant treatment and high-risk patient populations. She directs the High Risk Breast Clinic at the JGH Stoll Cancer Prevention Centre.



Chair
Debate
"One Week of Whole Breast RT is the New Standard of Care"

Wendy Woodward, MD,PH
Professor, Radiation Oncology Department
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Woodward is a Professor and the Section Chief of Clinical Breast Radiation in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC). She is a physician-scientist specializing in clinical breast radiation oncology with a lab focused on breast cancer stem cell biology and radiobiology. Dr. Woodward is the Deputy Director of the MDACC Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic and Research Program and is dedicated to advancing the radiation treatment and biologic understanding of inflammatory breast cancer through laboratory, translational, and clinical research. Nationally, she serves as a translational science liaison for the breast working group in NRG Oncology devoted to designing translational endpoints for multi-institutional trials in breast radiation therapy. Finally, Dr. Woodward has a strong interest in education and mentoring trainees in both clinical and translational breast cancer research and has received awards for post-doctoral and Resident mentoring.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Oligo-progressive disease. Treating locally more than systemically "

Amy J. Xu, MD, PhD
Assistant Attending Radiation Oncologist
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center 

Dr. Amy Xu graduated Summa Cum Laude from Harvard University with a BA in Engineering Sciences and an MA in Chemistry in 2007. She obtained her MD PhD with the Health Sciences and Technology program at Harvard Medical School, and completed her PhD in Biophysics under the mentorship of Timothy Springer. Following an internship in Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, she joined our MSK Radiation Oncology residency program, where she served as Chief Resident.

She is currently an Assistant Radiation Oncology Attending at Memorial Sloan Kettering, where she treats patients as part of the External Beam Radiotherapy Manhattan Service with focuses on breast carcinoma and metastatic disease. She serves as co-director of a novel Inpatient Radiation Oncology service and is also a member of a multidisciplinary Inflammatory Breast Cancer clinic. She has published on the outcomes of radiation in oligometastatic breast cancer, palliative radiation, inpatient radiation delivery, and breast cancer radiation.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 3
"Targets in Triple Negative Breast Cancer"

Clinton Yam, MD, MS
Assistant Professor
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Clinton Yam's overarching career goal is to perform practice changing research in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) with a focus on developing the next generation of patient-centered studies aimed at overcoming resistance to standard therapies. His expertise in the field of TNBC has been recognized by invitations to speak at local and international meetings, academic awards, and peer-reviewed funding. Within MD Anderson, he leads the TNBC working group and is the Pl of 4 investigator-initiated trials in breast cancer.

He completed his medical degree at the National University of Singapore where he graduated at the top of his class. As a resident at the University of Pennsylvania, he was heavily involved in research in breast cancer, drug development and tumor immunology.  He published several first-author  manuscripts during residency and was awarded the Frederick F. Samaha Award for best resident research. During fellowship, he continued his work in drug development and published, as first author, the results of several early-phase clinical trials including a phase I trial evaluating the novel combination of PX-866 (Pl3K inhibitor) and vemurafenib in advanced BRAF V600-mutant  solid malignancies  (Clinical Cancer Research, PMID: 29051322). He received formal laboratory training leading to an MS in Cancer Biology during fellowship and developed a body of work in TNBC under the mentorship of Stacy Moulder, Jennifer Litton, Debu Tripathy, and Mien-Chie Hung. He has authored or co-authored publications in peer-reviewed journals such as Nature Communications and Clinical Cancer Research. He received extra-mural, peer-reviewed funding during fellowship (ASCO Young Investigator Award and the Gianni Bonadonna Breast Cancer Research Fellowship) which supported the collection and investigation of biospecimens from patients on our Moonshot-funded ARTEMIS trial (NCT02276443), which he currently leads as Pl. Their team's work has been highlighted at key national and international meetings and was the source of an invited poster discussion at the 2020 ASCO Annual Meeting wherhe described novel findings from deep spatial analyses of the tumor-immune microenvironment in TNBC. In 2020, as a first year faculty member at MD Anderson, he was awarded the ASCO Career Development Award to further develop this critical body of work in TNBC.



Speaker
Mini-Symposium
"Targeting DNA damage response and HRD in breast cancer"

Timothy A. Yap, MBBS, PhD
Associate Professor
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Tim Yap, MD, PhD is a Medical Oncology Physician-Scientist and a Tenure-Track Associate Professor in the Departments of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics (Phase I Program), and Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC). He is also the Medical Director of the Institute for Applied Cancer Science, and Associate Director of Translational Research in the Institute for Personalized Cancer Therapy at MDACC.

Dr. Yap joined the Faculty at MDACC in 2016 from the Royal Marsden Hospital and The Institute of Cancer Research (London, England), where he was a National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre Clinician-Scientist in Medical Oncology. He was on the Faculty of the Phase I Drug Development Unit and Lung Cancer Unit, where he also led the Cancer Biomarkers Laboratory involved with the development of cfDNA and CTCs.

Dr. Yap’s main interests include the design and conduct of hypothesis-testing, biomarker-driven clinical trials ranging from first-in-human phase I studies to phase II tumor-agnostic multi-genotype basket trials, which incorporate detailed tumor molecular profiling studies, as well as the assessment of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) as predictive biomarkers of response for novel targeted agents and immunotherapies in clinical trials. His main therapeutic interests include the targeting of the DNA damage response (DDR) with novel therapeutics, such as ATR, PARP and DNA-PK inhibitors, as well as the development of novel PD-1/PD-L1 combinations with agents targeting ICOS, TGF-beta, PI3K/AKT, TIM-3, STING, Adenosine A2AR, LAG-3 and CDK2/4/6.



Speaker
The Year in Review
"Basic science"

Xiang H. F. Zhang, PhD
William T. Butler Professor
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Xiang Zhang obtained his Ph.D. degree from Columbia University in 2006, and did his postdoctoral training at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from 2006 to 2011. He was then recruited to the Breast Center of Baylor College of Medicine as a McNair Scholar, and is now the William T. Butler Endowed Professor. His lab focuses on metastatic breast cancer, and has made seminal contributions in two areas: 1) bone metastasis and 2) tumor immunology and immunotherapies. In the former, he discovered the osteogenic niche that promotes early-stage bone colonization (Wang et al., Cancer Cell; 2015, Wang et al., Cancer Cell, 2018; Zhang et al., Cell, 2021; and Bado et al., Developmental Cell), and invented a series of pre-clinical models and technologies to accelerate anti-metastasis drug discovery (Wang et al., Nature Communications 2017). In the latter, he uncovered the link between oncogenic mTOR signaling and recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (Welte, et al., Nature Cell Biology, 2016), and a mutual regulatory loop between tumour vasculature and immunostimulatory reprogramming (Tian et al., Nature, 2017). More recently, he demonstrated how different immunosubtypes of tumor microenvironment may affect responses to checkpoint blockade therapies (Kim et al., Nature Cell Biology, 2019), and exhibit different responses to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity (Lo et al., Nature Cancer, 2020). These discoveries have made significant impacts in our understanding of tumor-microenvironment interactions and the consequent effects on therapies.

Dr. Zhang is the first or corresponding author of over 30 papers published in journals including Cell, Nature, Cancer Cell, Nature Cell Biology, Developmental Cell, Nature Cancer, Nature Communications, Genes and Development, PNAS, Genome Research and MCB. He also co-authored another 50 papers published in Cell, Nature, Cancer Cell, Nature Medicine and etc. His awards include “Thesis with Distinction” by Columbia University (2006), the McNair Scholarship by Baylor College of Medicine (2011), Pathway to Independence Award by NCI (2010-2014), DoD BCRP Era of Hope Scholarship (2016), Excellent in Research Award of MCB, BCM (2016), Theresa Foundation Leadership Award (2016), and Susan G. Komen Career Catalyst Award (2014-2017), Michael E. DeBakey Award for Excellence in Research, BCM (2018), Sue Eccles Young Investigator Award by the Metastasis Research Society (2018), and Laura Zisken Award of Translational Breast Cancer Research (2020). He is a co-director of the annual Metastatic Breast Cancer Conference. He is an ad hoc reviewer of Nature, Science, Cell, Nature Medicine, Nature Cancer, Nature Cell Biology, Nature Communications, Cancer Cell, Cell Stem Cell, Cell Reports, PNAS, JEM, Cancer Research, RNA, Nucleic Acid Research, BMC Bioinformatics, Breast Cancer Cancer Research and Treatment and Breast Cancer Research, and is an active member of American Association of Cancer Research (since 2012), Metastasis Research Society (since 2015), and American Association of Immunology (since 2016).



Speaker
Educational Session
"Understanding the anti-cancer immune response: Innate and adaptive responses to cancer cells"

Laurence Zitvogel, MD, PhD
Immunooncologist
Institut Gustave Roussy

Prof. L. Zitvogel, clinical oncologist and research director, has been actively contributing to the field of cancer immunology and immunotherapy since 1992. She brought together basic and translational research, including the design of cancer therapies through combined animal studies and Phase I patient trials. Her expertise is mainly dendritic cell and innate effector biology and relevance during tumour development as well as exosome-based vaccine designs. She pioneered the concept of immunogenic cell death and showed that chemotherapy, radiotherapy and inhibitors of tyrosine kinase mediate their tumoricidal activity, at least partly through the immune system. She recently uncovered the immunosuppressive role of antibiotics in immunotherapy of cancer and the impact of the gut microbiota composition in regulating antitumor immunity during therapy with cyclophosphamide and immune checkpoint inhibitors. She received numerous Prizes and awards (Brupbacher, ASCO-SITC, ESMO, Baillet-Latour, Léopold Griffuel…), is an elected member of several Academies (National Academy of Medicine, Academia Europaea, European Academy of Cancer Sciences) and was nominated “Officer à l’Ordre de la Légion d’honneur” by the Health Ministery. Her H-factor is 145, with >500 publications on PubMed, 106 265 citations in Clarivate analytics (highly cited researchers 2018, 2017, 2016). Currently, she directs the Research Department of ImmunoOncology, and the Microbiota-centered intervention program (Clinicobiome) at Gustave Roussy Cancer Center, Grand-Paris, France, the Clinical Program Grant “Lumière” and the EU Program Grant “Oncobiome”.