Faculty


Discussant
General Session 3

Sylvia Adams, MD
Medical Oncologist
New York University
Perlmutter Cancer Center



Moderator
General Session 4

Kathy Albain, MD
Professor of Medicine
Loyola University Chicago



Discussant
Spotlight Session 13
"Therapies"

Carey K. Anders, MD
Medical Oncologist
Duke Cancer Institute

Dr. Carey K. Anders is a Professor of Medicine and the Medical Director of the Duke Brain and Spine Metastases Program and a member of the Neuro-Oncology (primary) and Breast Cancer (secondary) Programs within the Duke Cancer Institute. Dr. Anders is a leading expert in the clinical care of patients with breast cancer of all stages, with a research focus in breast cancer that spreads to the central nervous system (CNS).  In her role at Duke, she is expanding her clinical and research focus to brain metastases arising from solid tumors, more globally, alongside a state-of-the-art multidisciplinary team.  Prior to her arrival at Duke, Dr. Anders was an Associate Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill were she established herself as a translational/clinical investigator.  Over a decade at UNC, she focused on the biologic underpinnings of breast cancer brain metastases, was involved in many preclinical studies evaluating promising new therapies in models of breast cancer brain metastases, and designed, implemented, and completed numerous, novel clinical trials for patients with breast cancer brain metastases. 

Dr. Anders earned her medical degree from the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University in 2002. She then completed her residency in Internal Medicine, followed by her fellowship in Hematology-Oncology at Duke University.  Following her training at Duke in 2008, she transitioned to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she served as the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center (LCCC) Breast Cancer Program co-leader, the director of the LCCC Breast Cancer Clinical Trials Program, and Section Chief of Breast Medical Oncology.  She was recruited back to Duke in January of 2019 where she currently serves as the Medical Director of the Brain and Spine Metastases Program. Among her accomplishments, she is a Translating Duke Health Scholar, and a recipient of a Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator Award, an NCI Mentored Research Scholar Grant, and the American Society of Clinical Oncology Advanced Clinical Research Award. She also serves of the co-leader of the Hoosier Cancer Research Network Breast Committee and is an active member of the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium. 



Discussant
Special Session
"Global Perspectives on Breast Cancer Care during the COVID-19 Pandemic how BC was managed and lessons Learned"

Felipe Andrade, MD
Physician
Hospital Sirio Libanes



Moderator
Workshop
"FDA  and Breast Cancer Workshop"

Carlos L. Arteaga, MD
Professor and Director
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center

Dr. Arteaga obtained his MD degree at the University of Guayaquil in Ecuador. He trained in Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology at Emory University and the University of Texas Health Sciences Center San Antonio, respectively. He joined Vanderbilt in 1989 where he served as Associate Director for Translational/Clinical Research, Director of the Center for Cancer Targeted Therapies and the Breast Cancer Program of the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC). He has over 300 publications in the areas of signaling by growth factor receptors and oncogenes in breast tumor cells, development of targeted therapies and biomarkers of drug action and resistance, and investigator-initiated clinical trials in breast cancer. Since 2002, he directed the NCI-funded Vanderbilt Breast Cancer SPORE where he co-led several investigator-initiated clinical trials. His research is or has been funded by the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society, the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, Stand Up 2 Cancer (SU2C), the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation, and the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. He is member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation (1998) and the Association of American Physicians (2005). He served in the NCI Board of Scientific Counselors (1999-2004), NCI Parent Subcommittee A for review of Cancer Centers (2004-2008), the Breast Core Committee of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) and the Board of Directors of the American Association for Cancer Research (2004-2007). Arteaga is the recipient of the 2003 AACR Richard & Hinda Rosenthal Award, a 2007-2017 ACS Clinical Research Professor Award, the 2009 Gianni Bonadonna Award from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the 2011 Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction from the Komen Foundation, and the 2015 Prize for Scientific Excellence in Medicine from the American-Italian Cancer Foundation. He was elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2013 and Fellow of the AACR Academy in 2015, and serves in the Scientific Advisory Board of the Komen Foundation. He chaired the AACR Special Conference ‘Advances in Breast Cancer Research’ (2003-11) and has served as AACR co-chair of the annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium since 2009. He was Deputy Editor of Clinical Cancer Research (2005-2013) and is member of the Editorial Board of Cancer Cell, Cancer Discovery and six other peer-reviewed journals. He serves in the advisory boards of several academic Breast Cancer Programs and NCI-designated Cancer Centers. He served as the 2014-2015 President of the American Association for Cancer Research, the largest cancer research organization in the world. In 2017, he was appointed as Director of the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center and Associate Dean of Oncology Programs at UT Southwestern Medical Center.



Speaker
Special Session
"Weighing the benefits and harms of breast cancer screening"

Philippe Autier, MD, MPH, PhD
Vice-President, Population Research
International Prevention Research Institute 

Philippe Autier was born in Brussels, Belgium, and received a Doctor of Medicine degree from the Université Libre de Bruxelles and a diploma in tropical medicine from the Prince Leopold Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp in 1983. He started his professional life by joining the humanitarian non-governmental organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), where he helped in Honduras (1985 and 1986), and later in Chad (1987-88) as the medical coordinator of projects conducted by a team of approximately 50 expatriates and 200 Chadian health workers.

In 1988-89, Philippe Autier was the first head of the medical department of MSF-Belgium. He is one of the founders and a board member of the organisation AEDES that provides expertise in public health to low and middle income countries. In 1990 he received a Fulbright fellowship with a grant from the Frank Boas Foundation to study at Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, where he was awarded an MPH. In 2011, he received a PhD from the Erasmus University in Rotterdam for his works on the cutaneous melanoma. Philippe Autier has been head of the Prevention and Screening Department of the Jules Bordet Institute in Brussels (1992-95 and 2002-2005), Deputy Director at the European Institute of Oncology in Milano (1995-2000), and Group Head at the International Agency for research on Cancer in Lyon (2000-2010). 

Philippe Autier is a leading figure in several fields including research on cutaneous melanoma and breast cancer, especially in domains related to the causation, prevention and early detection of these cancers. He is also very involved in the clinical testing of new methods for cancer detection and in health technology assessment. In the last ten years, Philippe Autier has embraced the domain of real world data and pharmaco-epidemiology, including the creation of collaborations with government-owned health-related databases and patient's registries.

In 2013 he was appointed Professor at Strathclyde University. Philippe Autier is Vice President, Population Research, at the International Prevention Research Institute.



Speaker
The Year in Review
"Translational research"

Justin Balko, PharmD, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine and Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Justin M. Balko obtained his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 2004.  After completion of his PhD in the Clinical and Experimental Therapeutics track of the Pharmaceutical Sciences program at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, KY, he joined the laboratory of Carlos L. Arteaga, MD, in 2009 as a postdoctoral research fellow.

Dr. Balko was appointed as Assistant Professor of Medicine in January of 2015 and promoted to Associate Professor of Medicine and Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology in February of 2020.  He has published approximately 90 papers in the field of molecular oncology and translational oncology research, primarily in the breast cancer field.  His laboratory focuses on identifying biomarkers and mechanisms of drug sensitivity or resistance in breast cancer and other tumor types, ways to enhance response rates to immunotherapy by targeting cancer-specific signals of immune suppression, and the biological mechanisms of immune-related adverse events to immunotherapies. His laboratory receives funding from the NIH/NCI, the Department of Defense, The IBC Network Foundation, the Jimmy V Foundation for Cancer Research, The Mary Kay Foundation, Stand Up 2 Cancer/AACR, and Susan G. Komen.  He is currently a correlative sciences Principal Investigator on several breast cancer trials employing combinations of molecularly-targeted agents with immunotherapy.  



Speaker
Debate
"Against - All Breast Cancer Patients Should Have Germline Genetic Testing"

Judith Balmaña Gelpi, PhD
Head, Hereditary Cancer Genetics Group
Vall d'Hebron University Hospital

Judith Balmaña Gelpi, MD, PhD graduated in Medicine at the Universitat de Barcelona and carried out her residency in medical oncology at the Hospital Sant Pau, Barcelona. She was awarded with a grant from "La Caixa" and trained as a clinical research fellow in the High Risk Clinics for Breast and Gastrointestinal Cancer at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston (USA). On her return from the US in 2005, she was hired in the Medical Oncology Department from Vall d´Hebron University Hospital to establish the Familial Cancer Program. Since then, she has been leading the VHIO´s High Risk and Cancer Prevention Group and she is serving as Attending Physician in the Breast Cancer Unit. She obtained her PhD from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona for her research on a prediction model for hereditary colorectal cancer.  

She has been involved in research projects related with genetic epidemiology of hereditary breast cancer, which have shed light on the prevalence of mutations in BRCA and non-BRCA genes in these families in her setting. She is also interested in investigating the clinical and psychosocial impact of germline genetic testing for hereditary cancer and is actively involved in clinical development of targeted therapies for patients with a BRCA or homologous recombination repair deficiency, mainly with breast cancer. In this field, Dr Balmaña is collaborating in the identification of biomarkers for PARP inhibitor sensitivity.  

Dr Balmaña teaches at the School of Medicine of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) and Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC), and is the clinical coordinator of the cancer genetics module in the Master Program in Genetic Counselling (IDEC/ Universitat Pompeu Fabra).  

In 2015 Dr Balmaña was awarded with the “Prize to Biomedical Research Excellence” by the “Col.legi Oficial de Metges de Barcelona”.  She has been an ESMO Faculty member since 2009, and was Chairman of the Familial Cancer Program for ESMO Conference in 2011-2012. Furthermore, she is the ESMO Faculty Coordinator of the Cancer Genetics Group (2017-2021).  

Dr Balmaña is author of many peer-reviewed articles and book chapter in her fields of expertise.



Speaker
Translational Science Forum
"What's available now and what's on the horizon (Early development)"

Aditya Bardia, MBBS, MPH
Attending Physician
Massachusetts General Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Dr. Aditya Bardia, a board-certified medical oncologist, is an Attending Physician at Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston. As the Director of Precision Oncology Program at the MGH Center for Breast Cancer, Dr. Bardia is interested in integrating precision diagnostics and therapeutics, including clinical application of circulating tumor cells and DNA as “liquid biopsy”, to significantly improve the outcomes of patients afflicted with breast cancer. Dr. Bardia has led the clinical development of antibody drug conjugate (ADC), sacituzumab govitecan, and selective estrogen receptor degrader (SERD), elacestrant, in metastatic breast cancer. Dr. Bardia has received several research awards including outstanding award for research excellence at Mayo Clinic, Young Investigator Award from ASCO, and Douglas Family Foundation prize for excellence in oncology research at MGH. Dr. Bardia is the editor of precision medicine clinic section of The Oncologist, co-leader of the Molecular and Precision (MAP) tumor board at MGH, and editorial board member of ASCO TAPUR. 



Moderator
Workshop
"FDA and Breast Cancer Workshop"

Julia Beaver, MD
Chief of Medical Oncology
Food and Drug Administration



Discussant
Spotlight Session 4
"Refining the role of regional nodal irradiation"

Jennifer R. Bellon, MD
Radiation Oncologist
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Jennifer Bellon is the Director of Breast Radiation Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital and an Associate Professor of Radiation Oncolopgy at Harvard Medical School.  She is the co-chair of the NCI local task force on breast cancer, head of the oral boards examination in breast cancer for the American Board of Radiology, and the Senior Editor in breast cancer for the International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology and Physics.  Her practice focuses on the treatment of women with breast malignancy.  



Speaker
Educational Session
"Evolution and heterogeneity"

Andrea Bild, PhD
Professor, Department of Medical Oncology and Therapeutics
City of Hope

Dr. Andrea Bild is experienced in genomic analysis of breast cancer and uses systems biology to measure response to therapy. 



Discussant
Spotlight Session 12
"CVAs, infertility and gynecologic complications: what else is affecting the patient?"

Anne Blaes, MD, MS
Associate Professor
University of Minnesota

Dr. Anne Blaes is an Associate Professor in the Division of Hematology and Oncology at the University of Minnesota.  She is the section head of Medical Oncology within this division and is Director of Cancer Survivorship Services and Translational Research within the Masonic Cancer Center.  She is an active medical oncologist with a special interest in breast cancer, the late effects of cancer therapy, particularly in the area of cardio-oncology. Her research focuses on designing and implementing strategies to help prevent the long term complications of treatments in our cancer survivors, particularly in the areas of cardiovascular health.  She is the Chair for the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s Cancer Survivorship Committee, a member of the Executive Board for the Global Cardiooncology Society, associate editor for JACC Cardiooncology, and an active member of the ALLIANCE for Cancer Clinical Trials. 



Moderator

Special Session
"Breast Cancer and COVID19"

Melissa L. Bondy, PhD
Chair and Professor
Stanford Medicine

Dr. Melissa Bondy is Chair and Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health at Stanford University School of Medicine and Associate Director for Population Sciences at the Stanford Cancer Institute.   She was a Komen Scholar (Susan G. Komen Foundation) from 2011-2017 and a McNair Medical Institute Scholar.  She is an established cancer epidemiologist with a multi-disciplinary focus on translational research. Her research focus integrates the field of epidemiology with the lab and clinic. She is at the forefront of developing innovative ways to assess the roles of heredity and genetic susceptibility in the etiology of cancer, primarily brain and breast cancer. She has served on many cancer center advisory committees and she is a member of the NCI Board of Scientific Advisors.  



Speaker

Educational Session
"Targeting DDR"

Simon Boulton, PhD
Senior Group Leader
Francis Crick Institute and Artios Pharma Ltd.

Simon Boulton is a senior group leader at the Francis Crick Institute. His research is focused on understanding DNA repair mechanisms, with emphasis on DNA double stand break (DSB) repair pathways and their utilization in meiosis, during DNA replication and at telomeres. His work using genetics, biochemistry and biophysical approaches has led to the discovery of novel DNA repair genes and provided molecular insights into human diseases, including cancer. Most notably, Boulton’s work has played an instrumental role in shaping our understanding of the regulation and execution of homologous recombination (HR), a key DSB repair pathway frequently inactivated in cancer. Boulton is also Scientific Co-founder and SVP Science Strategy of Artios Pharma Ltd, which is developing small molecule DNA repair inhibitors to selectively kill cancer cells either as mono-therapies or in combination with existing treatments. Boulton has helped raise $130m private and strategic investment for the company and currently assist the executive team in the identification and evaluation of new pipeline opportunities from the global DNA repair network. The companies leading two assets, ATR and POLQ inhibitors, will enter clinical trials in early 2021. 



Discussant
Spotlight Session 13
"Target, sanctuary site"

Priscilla Brastianos, MD
Director, Central Nervous System Metastasis Center
Massachusetts General Hospital

Dr. Priscilla Brastianos completed her medical school and internal medicine residency at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and fellowship training in hematology/oncology and neuro-oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital. She is now director of the Central Nervous System Metastasis Center at Massachusetts General Hospital and leads an R01-funded laboratory. Dr. Brastianos’ research focuses on understanding the genomic mechanisms that drive primary and metastatic brain tumors. She has lead studies which have identified novel therapeutic targets in primary and metastatic brain tumors. She has more than 125 scientific publications and has translated her scientific findings to innovative national multicenter trials. She also leads a multidisciplinary central nervous system metastasis clinic at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. She has received a number of awards for her work including a ‘NextGen Star’ award by the American Association for Cancer Research, a Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator Award, a Breast Cancer Research Foundation Award, a Susan G. Komen Dare Award, a Susan G. Komen Career Catalyst Award and the American Brain Tumor Association Joel Gringas Award.



Speaker

Workshop
"Improving clinical trial design"

Thomas Braun, PhD
Professor
University of Michigan School of Public Health

Dr. Thomas Braun is a leading expert in the design of adaptive Phase I clinical trials, having published numerous applied and methodologic manuscripts in this area for approximately 20 years. He has also been the primary statistician for the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center Blood and Marrow Transplantation (BMT) Program for 20 years and has expert knowledge in the design and analysis of data from clinical trials and basic science experiments for the study of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD). He has also collaborated extensively in the analysis of data collected on adults with breast and lung cancer, and he is very familiar with the use of immunotherapy for the treatment of both diseases.



Chair

Spotlight Session 13
" Brain Metastases Targets and Treatment"

Andrew Brenner, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
UT Health San Antonio



Chair

Spotlight Session 3
" Advances in the Treatment of HER2+ Disease"

Adam Brufsky, MD, PhD
Professor of Medicine
University of Pittsburgh



Speaker

Mini-Symposium
"Beyond hormones: Newer pharmacologic approaches"

Powel Brown, MD, PhD
Professor and Chair, Clinical Cancer Prevention
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Powel Brown is Professor and Chairman of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center's Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention and holds a joint appointment in the Department of Breast Medical Oncology. For more than 30 years, he has provided cancer treatment and cancer preventive care to patients.  In their clinical research program, they are testing novel drugs and strategies to prevent cancer. In Dr. Brown’s clinical practice, he treats women with breast cancer and manages breast cancer survivors and women at high risk of breast cancer.  He also conducts clinical, translational, and laboratory-based breast cancer research to identify ways to prevent breast cancer, especially the most aggressive form of this disease, "triple-negative breast cancer". In his laboratory, they use genomics and proteomics to discover critical "drivers" of breast cancer development. They then target these molecular drivers in animals and women to treat and even prevent breast cancer. Through these efforts, they will develop safe and effective strategies to eliminate breast cancer.



Speaker

Clinical Science Forum
"Understanding current platforms"

Mark E. Burkard, MD, PhD
Professor of Medicine and Oncology
University of Wisconsin - Madison

Dr. Burkard is Professor of Medicine and Oncology at the University of Wisconsin.  He serves as Associate Director of Genomics and Precision medicine and, in this role, coordinates cancer precision medicine activities across the UW Health system and state-wide partners.  He completed his MD and PhD in chemistry as part of the University of Rochester Medical Scientist Training Program.  Thereafter, he completed Internal Medicine Training and New York Hospital/Cornell, followed by Medical Oncology training at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in 2008.  At the University of Wisconsin, he leads a federally-funded laboratory program in breast cancer cell biology and has authored, or coauthored 42 publications.  His group has been active in patient engagement, through the Outliers project, which focuses on genomics of individuals who are extreme survivors with metastatic breast cancer.  In 2015, he co-founded the Precision Medicine Molecular Tumor Board,  which reviews over 1400 precision medicine cases per year across regional health systems, and coordinates the associated precision medicine trials at UW Carbone Cancer Center.  He has received the Dean's Teaching Award, the Page-Grossman Professional Award, and the Vilas Mid-Career Investigator Award, and has been an invited speaker in precision oncology across the U.S. and internationally at the Asia-Pacific Breast Cancer Summit.  He serves as a member of the ASCO/TAPUR Molecular Tumor Board, associate editor of Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, and is a member of the Strata Oncology Clinical Advisory Board.



Speaker

Educational Session
"Special topics in early stage ER+ breast cancer "

David Cameron, MBBS, MD
Professor of Oncology
Cancer Research UK Edinburgh
The University of Edinburgh

Prof. Cameron’s first degree was in mathematics from the University of Cambridge, and he received his medical degree in 1986 from St. George’s Hospital Medical School, London. After completing a fellowship and MSc in Clinical Oncology at the University of Edinburgh, he received a M.D. with distinction in 1997 and completed his training as a medical oncologist that same year. He is currently director of cancer services in NHS Lothian, the CSO clinical cancer research champion, and the clinical director of the Edinburgh University Cancer Centre and CRUK cancer centres. These latter two roles he stepped down from in September 2019 in order to take on the role of chair of the Breast International Group, a Brussels-based umbrella group of over 60 worldwide academic/not-for-profit breast cancer trials’ groups, and to be vice chair of the steering group of the Oxford-based Early Breast Cancer Clinical Trialists’ Group. He will remain as the joint lead for the Edinburgh Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre

He is active in a number of current and past clinical trials in breast cancer.  He is a member of the executive committee of the HERA adjuvant herceptin trial, and a member of the steering group for several UK adjuvant breast cancer trials, as well as the BIG APHINITY, ALTTO/NEO_ALTTO, BRAVO and AURORA studies and other international breast cancer studies. He was chief investigator on the UK trial adjuvant breast cancer trial, TACT2, and of BEATRICE, a global trial that tested the possible benefit of adjuvant bevacizumab in triple negative breast cancer, and serves on the iDMC of a number of clinical trials in breast and other cancers.

Between November 2006 & June 2010 he was Director of the NIHR-funded National Cancer Research Networks, and at the end of 2009 took up a new post as Professor of Oncology at Edinburgh University and Director of Cancer Services in NHS Lothian. He is a present and past member of several cancer research funding committees including INCA PHRC, PAIR (Sein), Cancer Research UK Science committee, Cancer Research UK Clinical Research Committee, and from time to time various NIHR funding bodies including EME, clinical trials fellows committee.  He is on the advisory board of the ICR and Glasgow Clinical Trials Units, and the Bordeaux Institute Bergonie SIRIC and the Cardiff Cancer Clinical and Translational Research programmes.



Speaker

Educational Session
"State of the art treatment for neoadjuvant/adjuvant triple negative breast cancer"

Lisa A. Carey, MD
Jacobs Preyer Distinguished Professor for Breast Cancer Research
University of North Carolina
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center

Lisa Carey’s research interests focus upon breast cancer, including examination of different subtypes of breast cancer, evaluation of new chemotherapy agents in early and metastatic breast cancer, and examination of tumor characteristics that predict response to therapy.

She has worked extensively with scientists across UNC Lineberger and the UNC Gillings Global School of Public Health to better understand and characterize the molecular subtypes of breast cancer so that we may develop better prevention and treatment strategies. With Drs. Perou and Millikan, she identified the elevated risk of the poor-prognosis basal-like breast cancer subtype in young African-American women. She is a world-wide expert in triple negative breast cancer, and led the first trial looking at a new drug regimen in this breast cancer subtype.

Her research spans the spectrum from early curative breast cancer to metastatic disease. She has worked extensively developing trials that use neoadjuvant, or preoperative, chemotherapy for breast cancer in order to address both clinical questions about the best regimens, as well as scientific questions regarding sensitivity or resistance to drugs. She led a large NCI-sponsored trial in HER2-positive breast cancer that examined dual HER2-targeting with two anti-HER2 drugs that found that while drug regimen was important in outcome, even more important were tumor characteristics such as subtype and evidence of immune cell activation. Based on this work, she has put together an international team looking at the molecular markers responsible this variation in response and survival, and her efforts as co-chair of the national cooperative group, Alliance, have resulted in two NCI trials examining these markers and optimizing treatment. In addition, she is actively involved in examining novel agents in metastatic breast cancer. Her Tumor Donation Program has contributed novel information regarding the genetic differences between the original primary breast cancer and the metastases in distant organs. This work in part spawned the AURORA-US multicenter initiative furthering this examination of the molecular landscape of metastatic disease; she serves on the Steering Committee for that effort.

She serves in national leadership roles, including as a member of the National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Steering Committee, Co-Chair of the NCI-sponsored Alliance Breast Committee, Co-Chair of the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium Steering Committee, and member of the Board of Directors of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.



Speaker

Educational Session
"Tumor biology by race and ethnicity"

John D. Carpten, PhD
Professor and Chair of Translational Genomics
Keck School of Medicine of USC



Chair

Spotlight Session 4
"Updates on Strategies to Refine Management of the Axilla"

Abigail Caudle, MD, MS
Associate Professor
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Caudle is an Associate Professor in the Department of Breast Surgical Oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX and serves as the Vice President of Procedural & Therpaeutic Practice. She did her surgical residency at the University of North Carolina and a surgical oncology fellowship at MD Anderson Cancer Center.  She has a Masters in Clinical Research Design and Statistical Analysis from the University of Michigan. Her research has centered on surgical advances in breast surgery, their implementation into practice, as well as development of quality measures. 



Discussant

Spotlight Session 8
"Novel mechanisms"

Sarat Chandarlapaty, MD, PhD
Attending Physician
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

The goal of Dr. Chandarlapaty's research is to investigate the mechanisms and consequences of activation of growth factor and hormone signaling pathways in transformation and the targeted therapy of breast cancer. He is a Laboratory Head in the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program at MSKCC and a clinical investigator on the Breast Medicine Service of the Department of Medicine. As a PI or co-Investigator on several federal (NIH, DOD) and philanthropically-supported (BCRF) grants, he has led investigations into understanding the basis for breast cancer pathogenesis and developing novel pharmacologic strategies to overcoming  drug resistance. A major focus of his work has been to identify mechanisms of resistance to therapies targeting estrogen and growth factor signaling. This has included studies identifying mechanisms of resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Treatment differences and consequences"

Mariana Chavez MacGregor, MD, MSC
Associate Professor 
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Mariana Chavez MacGregor is a medical oncologist with a clinical practice dedicated to the care of patients with breast cancer. After finishing medical school at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, she obtained a Master in Sciences degree in Clinical Epidemiology at the Netherlands Institute of Health and Sciences.  She completed her Clinical Residency in Internal Medicine at Barnes-Jewish Hospital/Washington University School of Medicine followed by a Clinical Fellowship in Medical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. She is an Associate Professor at The University of MD Anderson Cancer Center, holding a primary appointment in the Health Services Research Department, and a joint appointment in the Breast Medical Oncology Department. 

In addition of being an active and compassionate clinician, Dr. Chavez MacGregor is committed to an academic a career. She has received a number of awards including the SWOG Young investigator award and the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) Young Investigator of the Year award. She received the Achievement in Clinical Research Award and was recently honored with the MD Anderson Faculty Scholar Award. She holds leadership positions within ASCO, currently serving as the past-chair of the Clinical Practice Guidelines Committee. Dr. Chavez MacGregor research focuses on breast cancer outcomes and disparities research. She has extensive experience evaluating patterns of care, toxicities and complications of cancer treatment. In addition, she has been involved in the planning, design and implementation of clinical trials and is an active member of SWOG. 

She has written more than 100 articles, review articles, invited commentaries, and book chapters on breast cancer.



Moderator
Basic Science Forum
"The Tumor and Immune Ecosystem of Breast Cancer"

Chonghui Cheng, MD, PhD
Associate Professor 
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Chonghui Cheng has received several prestigious awards throughout her professional career, including the Julian R. Rachele Award of Excellence and the Frank Lappin Horsfall, Jr. Fellowship as a PhD student, the Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, the Career Development Awards from the Schweppe Foundation and from AACR, the ACS Research Scholar Grant, the Lynn Sage Scholar, and the Rising-Star CPRIT Scholar in Cancer Research from Texas.

She has been a scientific reviewer for top-tier journals and for study sections in NCI, ACS, AACR and is currently a Medical Advisory Board member in the Lynn Sage Foundation. During her tenure at Northwestern University, she was Program Leader of the Tumor Invasion, Metastasis, and Angiogenesis Program at the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center (RHLCCC). Dr. Cheng organized several symposiums including the annual cancer center symposium at RHLCCC, was Faculty Search Committee member,  Chair of Travel Fellowship Review Board, and Course Director of the Tumor Cell Biology graduate course. Currently at Baylor College of Medicine since 2016, she serves as a co-organizer of the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center Annual Retreat, Graduate Education Program member in the Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Platform Judge of the Annual Department of Molecular & Cellular Biology Graduate Students Symposium, and a member in two Faculty Search Committees. She also chaired an RNA and Disease Workshop in the 2015 international RNA Society Annual Meeting and will be chairing the Basic Science Forum in the 2020 SABCS.

Her research interests are centered at understanding how RNA regulation affects breast cancer cell plasticity, resulting in tumor metastasis and therapeutic resistance. They are also pushing forward the research in circulating tumor cells (CTCs)and pioneering the RNA sequencing of CTCs. Dr. Cheng has been invited to give seminars at major Universities in the US, including Columbia University, UCLA, UCSD, MD Anderson, Emory University, etc. and is a regular presenter at national and international meetings, including the RNA Society Annual Meeting, the EMT International Association Meeting, and the Metastatic Breast Cancer Conference, etc. 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Dormancy"

Lewis A. Chodosh, MD, PhD
Perelman Professor in Cancer Biology
University of Pennsylvania 



Discussant
Spotlight Session 2 
"CDK4/6 inhibitor in early and late stage disease"

Amy S. Clark, MD, MSCE
Assistant Professor of Medicine
University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Clark graduated Haverford College with a BS and went on to work at the National Cancer Institute prior to matriculating into the Milton S. Hershey Penn State College of Medicine.  After earning her MD, she completed an internship and residency in Internal Medicine at Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine.  She then moved to Philadelphia to complete her fellowship training in Hematology/Oncology at the University of Pennsylvania.  During her fellowship she earned a Master of Science in Clinical Epidemiology with a concentration in Clinical Trials.  She then joined the breast medical oncology team at the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania where she currently works as an Assistant Professor of Medicine and Deputy Director of Clinical Trials for Breast Cancer.  Dr. Clark's research focus is on drug development, novel combination therapy with CDK 4/6 inhibitors and imaging biomarkers.  She was awarded a Susan G. Komen Career Catalyst Award for corollary studies incorporated into an investigator initiated Phase I trial combining ribociclib with paclitaxel and is a national PI on multiple cooperative group trials.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Special topics in mechanisms of therapeutic resistance"

Robert Clarke, PhD
Professor of Breast Biology
University of Manchester 

Robert Clarke, PhD is a Professor of Breast Biology and Director of the Manchester Breast Centre, based at the Oglesby Cancer Research Building.  His undergraduate BSc studies were in Biology at the University of Sussex and the Université de Grenoble.  Following two and half years as a Research Assistant with Chris Potten at the Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, he studied the control of proliferation in the normal and neoplastic human mammary gland for his PhD at The University of Manchester (1995). Subsequently, his post-doctoral training was with Dr Liz Anderson in the Clinical Research Department of The Christie, Manchester, and in 2001. He returned to The University of Manchester as a Group Leader in the Division of Cancer Sciences. 

He was Lecturer and Cancer Research UK Research Fellow from 2001-2006, a Senior Lecturer and Breast Cancer Now Research Fellow from 2006-2011 and a Reader in Breast Biology from 2014.



Speaker
Workshop
"Increasing clinical trial accrual"

Deborah Collyar, PhD
President
Patient Advocates in Research (PAIR)

Deborah Collyar has been a leader in patient engagement and advocacy since her first cancer diagnosis. She utilizes her business leadership, IT, and communication skills to bridge research gaps between scientists, medical providers, and patients. Deborah founded the Patient Advocates in Research (PAIR) international network in 1996, "where research meets reality" and consults with the health and medical research communities.

She has infused hundreds of patient advocates into research programs while creating a variety of trainings and delivering innovative ways to gather input from thousands of patients. Her work encompasses many diseases, programs and policies at grassroots, national and international levels, and emphasizes patient issues throughout early development and protocols, recruitment, retention, and results reporting. Deborah also serves as a consultant to Health Literacy Media (HLM) in their Clearly Communicating Clinical Trials (C3T) program.

Deborah encourages innovation in clinical trials and healthcare delivery. She has been a key member in pivotal projects with the NIH, NCI Clinical Trials Network (NCTN), ASCO, AACR, Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI), Center for Medical Technology Policy (CMTP), DIA, Institute of Clinical and Economic Review (ICER), Metastatic Breast Cancer Alliance (MBCA), Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Center (MRCT), Oncology Research Information Exchange Network (ORIEN), Society for Immunotherapy in Cancer (SITC), academic institutions, companies, and international consortia. She is a speaker, blogger, author, grant team member, trainer, and faculty at professional workshops like the Vail Methods in Clinical Research and the SITC Winter School, and presents the patient perspective at professional meetings. She and her husband have survived 3+ cancers, and they work with multiple communities and patients.



Speaker
Educational Session
"How and when to use immunotherapy and related toxicities"

Javier Cortes, MD, PhD
Head Breast Cancer Program
IOB Institute of Oncology, Madrid and Barcelona

Head of the Breast Cancer and Gynecological Tumor teams at the Ramón y Cajal University Hospital in Madrid, as well as Clinical Investigator of the Breast Cancer Research Program at the Vall d'Hebrón Institute of Oncology in Barcelona. The breast cancer program at the Oncological Institute (IOB) is also directed by Dr. Javier Cortés and is one of the most active in Spain and one of the most renowned in all of Europe.

He has been part of the development of the 4 approved drugs for metastatic breast cancer in Europe for the last 5 years. His group has led the fundamental trials that led to the approval of 3 out of 4 of these agents: pertuzumab, eribulin, and everolimus. Dr. Cortés is one of the European leaders in the field of HER2 + breast cancer. He is very involved in understanding the different mechanisms of resistance to treatment. Currently, he is leading one of the most exciting trials with cyclin D 4/6 inhibitors, a new group of compounds with surprising activity when combined with endocrine therapy.

Immunotherapy is also an area in which Dr. Cortés is very involved, mainly in the triple negative subtype. This could become a potential curative therapeutic approach for a significant number of patients with metastatic triple negative breast cancer in the future.It is part of more than 50 breast cancer projects, with a leadership position in more than 50% of them, including phase I to phase III studies. He hopes to have at least 6 to 8 new compounds in the next 5 years in the field of breast cancer.

Active member of the Spanish, European and American Societies of Medical Oncology (SEOM, ESMO, ASCO) and member of the Scientific Committee of the European Society of Medical Oncology.  

With a true passion for patient treatment, she is very interested in the patient's experience and cares about improving her quality of life. He hopes to cure most breast cancer patients in the coming years and is actively involved in cancer research to this end. 

Dr. Javier Cortés has a degree in Medicine and Surgery from the Autonomous University of Madrid in 1996. He continued his studies at the University of Navarra, specializing in Medical Oncology at the University Clinic of Navarra. Since 2003 he has worked in the Department of Medical Oncology at the Vall d'Hebron Hospital in Barcelona, where he has been Coordinator of the Teaching and Training Program for Residents in Oncology and Senior Specialist in the Area of Breast Cancer with a special interest in the Development of New Medicines. Dr. Cortés was the Director of the Breast Cancer Program and the Melanoma Unit from July 2006 to August 2015. He is also the author of more than 140 publications, more than 300 presentations and is an ad hoc reviewer for several magazines.



Moderator
Mini -Symposium
"Recent Advances in Breast Cancer Prevention"

Chair
Spotlight Session 11
"Novel Strategies for Breast Cancer Prevention: Diet, Exercise and Vaccine"

Katherine Crew, MD, MS
Associate Professor
Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Dr. Katherine Crew completed her internal medicine residency and medical oncology fellowship at Columbia University Irving Medical Center and has served as a faculty member there since 2005, as a breast medical oncologist. She currently serves as the Director for the Clinical Breast Cancer Prevention Program at the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center.

On the national level, she serves as the Executive Officer for the SWOG Cancer Prevention and Epidemiology, Cancer Survivorship, and Palliative Care/End of Life Committees and serves as the Chair of the NCI Cancer Prevention and Control Central Institutional Review Board (CIRB) and is a standing member of the NIH Cancer Prevention Study Section (CPSS).

She has a long-standing interest and background in the design of breast cancer prevention studies and has extensive training in the conduct of breast cancer clinical trials (MS Biostatistics, Columbia University; T32 Postdoctoral fellowship, Columbia University) and has been the PI or co-Investigator of several early phase breast cancer chemoprevention trials, including a multicenter randomized controlled trial of high-dose vitamin D in premenopausal women at high-risk for breast cancer, SWOG 0812. She currently leads two multi-PI R01 grants to increase breast cancer chemoprevention among high-risk women using health information technology. These trials involve web-based decision support tools for patients and healthcare providers, which are integrated into clinic workflow, to increase chemoprevention and genetic testing uptake among high-risk women. They are specifically targeting racially and ethnically diverse women with varying health literacy and numeracy. They are about to open a multicenter, cluster randomized controlled trial of chemoprevention decision support among healthcare providers and high-risk women with atypical hyperplasia or lobular carcinoma in situ, SWOG 1904

.In summary, she has demonstrated a track record of conducting multi-disciplinary projects in breast cancer prevention and translational medicine.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 3
"Biomarkers and disease characteristics to predict response and resistance to HER2 targeted therapy"

Discussant
Special Session
"Global Perspectives on Breast Cancer Care during the COVID-19 Pandemic how BC was managed and lessons Learned"

Giuseppe Curigliano, MD, PhD
Director Early Drug Development Division
University of Milano and Istituto Europeo di Oncologia IRCCS

Giuseppe Curigliano, MD PhD, is Associate Professor of Medical Oncology at the University of Milano and the Head of the Division of Early Drug Development at the European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Italy. He is a clinician and researcher specialising in early drug development for patients with solid tumours with a special commitment to breast cancer. He has been a member of the Italian National Health Council since 2018 and, in 2019, he served as Chair of the Scientific Committee of The Lega Nazionale Lotta ai Tumori. He has served as a Member of the ESMO Breast Cancer Faculty since 2001 and he is currently the Faculty Coordinator. He has also served on the Scientific Committee for the St Gallen Conference since 2011, and was the Scientific Co-Chair in St Gallen 2017 and 2019. He has been an Editorial Board Member for Annals of Oncology since 2014, and serves as Co-Editor in Chief of The Breast, Co-Editor in Chief of Cancer Treatment Reviews, Associate Editor of the European Journal of Cancer, Editor of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. He also serves on the European School of Oncology (ESO) faculty committee.  Dr. Curigliano serves ESMO as the Chair of the Guidelines Committee and is a Council Member. He is also the Chair of the Nomination Committee. He served as the Scientific Chair of the IMPAKT ESMO meeting that was held in Brussels in 2014 and as the Breast Cancer (metastatic) Track Chair of the ESMO 2014 meeting in Madrid. He served as Scientific Co-Chair of the ESMO Breast Cancer Congress in 2019 and 2020.He was awarded with the first ESO Umberto Veronesi Award in Vienna in 2017 and with the Fellowship of the European Academy of Cancer Sciences in Paris in 2017.He has contributed to over 390 peer-reviewed publications.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 11
"Novel cancer prevention interventions"

Andrea De Censi, MD
Director of the Division of Medical Oncology
E.0. Ospedali Galliera



Speaker
Educational Session
"New insights to cancer-associated systemic inflammation"

Karin de Visser, PhD
Group Leader Division of Tumor Biology and Immunology
Netherlands Cancer Institute

Prof. dr. Karin E. de Visser obtained her PhD at the Division of Immunology at the Netherlands Cancer Institute in Amsterdam in the field of tumor immunotherapy. From 2003-2005 she worked as a postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Prof. dr. Lisa Coussens at the University of California, San Francisco, where she developed an active interest in the interplay between the adaptive and innate immune system during cancer development. In 2005 she joined the laboratory of Prof. dr. Jos Jonkers at the Netherlands Cancer Institute, where she expanded her research direction into the field of inflammation and mammary carcinogenesis, using conditional mouse models. Currently she is senior group leader at the Division of Tumor Biology & Immunology at the Netherlands Cancer Institute, alongside her appointment as group leader at Oncode Institute and as professor of Experimental Immunobiology of Cancer at Leiden University Medical Center. The overall goal of her research is to understand by which mechanisms the immune system influences metastatic breast cancer. Her research group identified how mammary tumors induce a systemic inflammatory response that facilitates metastasis formation (Coffelt et al. Nature 2015) and how the genetic make-up of breast cancer dictates systemic pro-metastatic inflammation (Wellenstein et al. Nature 2019). Through mechanistic understanding of the crosstalk between the immune system and cancer she aims to contribute to the design of novel immunomodulatory strategies to fight metastatic breast cancer. Karin de Visser received an ERC consolidator grant in 2014 and a prestigious NWO-VICI grant in 2019, she is recipient of the 2015 Metastasis Research Prize of the Beug Foundation and in 2016 she was selected as a member of the EMBO young investigator program. More information can be found here: https://www.nki.nl/divisions/tumor-biology-immunology/de-visser-k-group/



Discussant
Spotlight Session 14
"Immune biomarkers"

Sandra Demaria, MD
Professor of Radiation Oncology and Pathology
Weill Cornell Medical College

Sandra Demaria, MD., a native of Turin, Italy, obtained her M.D. from the University of Turin, and then moved to New York City for her post-doctoral training in immunology as a Damon Runyon-Walter Winchell Cancer Research Fund awardee, followed by a residency in anatomic pathology at NYU School of Medicine (NYU SoM). She remained on the faculty at NYU SoM until 2015, raising to the rank of Professor. She is currently Professor of Radiation Oncology and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City. Dr. Demaria is internationally known for her studies demonstrating the synergy of radiotherapy with immunotherapy in pre-clinical cancer models. She was the first to show that radiotherapy can convert tumors unresponsive to immune checkpoint inhibitors into responsive ones, a finding being translated in several clinical trials at multiple institutions. Her lab has a central interest in addressing the molecular mechanisms that regulate ionizing radiation’s ability to generate an in situ tumor vaccine in both preclinical models as well as cancer patients. As a breast cancer pathologist Dr. Demaria also studies the immunological microenvironment of breast cancer in patients, and therapeutic strategies to modulate the immune infiltrate in preclinical models and in patients. She is a founding member of the International Immuno-Oncology Biomarker Working Group on Breast Cancer (https://www.tilsinbreastcancer.org/) that developed a consensus for the evaluation of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer. She has authored more than 140 articles and has received awards from the American Cancer Society, the Department of Defense CDMRP, the US National Cancer Institute, and several private Foundations, and serves in the editorial board of The Journal of Immunology, Cancer Immunology Research, and Journal for the Immunotherapy of Cancer. 



Moderator
General Session 1

Speaker
FDA  and Breast Cancer Workshop
"Current use and how the drugs fit into the current treatment landscape"

Angela DeMichele, MD, MSCE
Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology
University of Pennsylvania



Moderator
Educational Session
"Triple Negative Breast Cancer"

Speaker
Educational Session
"Deconstructing TNBC"

Speaker
Year in Review
"Advanced breast cancer"

Rebecca Dent, MD, MSc
Head and Senior Consultant Medical Oncology
National Cancer Center Singapore
Duke - NUS Medical School

Dr. Rebecca Dent's primary research interest is in the field of breast cancer, with a focus on locally advanced breast cancer and triple negative (TNBC)/basal-like breast cancers. She served as Chair of the locally advanced breast cancer program and Head, Breast Cancer Clinical Trials at the Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Center in Toronto, Ontario Canada from 2008-2011. 

Since beginning her position in February 2011 as a consultant and now senior consultant and Head of Department of Medical Oncology at the National Cancer Center in Singapore, she has founded and co-chaired eight Asia Pacific Breast Cancer Summits. This is a multidisciplinary meeting for the treatment of breast cancer in which they are able to attract over 500 attendees from over 25 countries in the Asia Pacific region. She is a steering committee member and PI for a number of large international trials in TNBC. They have secured funding for an investigator initiated global study evaluating the role of PARP inhibition with or without immune checkpoint inhibition in platinum sensitive TNBC. This is a Duke-Singapore Duke-USA collaborative trial. Finally. Dr. Dent has served on a number of international committees such as the American Society of Clinical Oncology Scientific Committee (ER/HER2 track), Education Chair Breast Track ASCO Annual Meeting, Scientific Committee Chair of European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) Asia and Chair, ESMO Metastatic Breast Track 2019 in Barcelona, and Scientific Committee Member ASCO Breakthrough Asia Meeting, Bangkok.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 2
"Newer targeted agents and NGS in metastatic disease"

Maria Vittoria Dieci, MD
Assistant Professor
University of Padova
Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS

Maria Vittoria Dieci, MD, is Assistant Professor at the University of Padua, Italy, and attending physician at the Division of Medical Oncology 2 of the Istituto Oncologico Veneto in Padua. She specialised in Oncology in March 2012 at the University of Modena.

From May 2012 to November 2013 she completed a 18-month-research experience at the Translational Research Unit (INSERM U981) of the Gustave Roussy Institute (Villejuif, France), and obtained the “Diplome Universitaire Européen en Recherche Translationnelle et Clinique en Cancérologie”.Since November 2013 she has been conducting research and clinical activity in the field of breast cancer at the University of Padua / Istituto Oncologico Veneto IRCCS.

Dr Dieci’s research production from 2008 up till now consists of more than 80 papers in peer-reviewed journals, either as main or co-author. She has participated as speaker to more than 100 national and international congresses and meetings. She is member of AIOM, ESMO and ASCO.



Discussant
Special Session 
"COVID-19 Pandemic Disproportionately Affects Care for Minority Cancer Patients in US-Based Study "

Deborah Doroshow, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Tisch Cancer Institute
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai



Panelist
View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?

Peter Dubsky, MD, PhD
Head of Breast Center
Hirslanden Klinik St. Anna Breast Center

Peter Dubsky was born in Vienna and was schooled in Germany, London and New York City. He received his MD from the University of Vienna in 1997 and began his surgical training at the University Clinic. He completed a post-doctoral fellowship in cancer immunology (Baylor Institute for Immunology Research, Dallas, Texas, USA) between 2002 and 2004.  After board certification in General Surgery in 2005, he focused his work on surgical oncology and was promoted to Senior Consultant at the Medical University of Vienna (MUV) in 2007. He continues to serve in Vienna as adjunct Professor of Surgery. Furthermore, he continues his long-time commitment to the Austrian Breast and Colorectal Cancer Study Group (ABCSG) and currently serves on their executive committee.

Starting April 2016 Dr. Dubsky has built the Breast Cancer Center at the Hirslanden Clinic St. Anna in Lucerne, Switzerland. Since then he has established full certification of the breast center and continues to build a Cancer Center for St. Anna Clinic. He also founded the Network of Hirslanden Breast Cancer Centers (NHBCC) and a Consensus Conference with a focus on surgery after primary systemic therapy during this time.

Dr. Dubsky has authored or co-authored more than 100 scientific publications with a total citation count of over 5000 and author h-index >40. Most of his work focuses on clinical trials in early breast cancer and biomarkers.  Since 2015 he has joined the faculty of the St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference since 2016 both as panelist and member of the consensus writing committee. In addition to the SABCS 2020, he has  has joined the ASCO and ESMO faculty of 2020.



Moderator
Clinical Science Forum
"Next Generation Sequencing in Clinical Practice"

Matthew J. Ellis, MB, BChir, BSc., PhD, FRCP
Director
Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr Matthew James Ellis a physician scientist who completed his training at the University of London (PhD) and the University of Cambridge (MB BChir).  He is currently the Director for the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine where he coordinates an interdisciplinary team of oncologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, basic scientists and statisticians focused on improving our ability to prevent, detect and treat breast cancer.  In addition, he is the Associate Director for Translational Research at the Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, with a broad role in promoting translational research.  His research has focuses on estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. He has championed neoadjuvant endocrine therapy as a non-toxic alternative to chemotherapy for promoting breast-conserving therapy in postmenopausal women with ER+ HER2- stage 2 and 3 disease (Journal of Clinical Oncology 2001).  He developed the Ki67 proliferation marker-based Preoperative Endocrine Prognostic Index (Journal of Clinical Oncology 2017) that is now undergoing a large validation study (the ALTERNATE study).  These clinical studies have provided the context and tumor specimens for seminal investigations into the ER+ breast cancer somatic genome, with insights into clonal heterogeneity (Nature Communications 2015), new tumor suppressor gene discovery specific to ER+ disease and new therapeutic targets (Nature 2012).  These include activating mutations in the HER2 gene that have been shown respond to HER2 kinase inhibition in clinical trials, particularly metastatic lobular carcinoma (Cancer Discovery 2013, Clinical Cancer Research 2017).  He also is a pioneer of patient-derived xenograft research (PDX).  A PDX study in triple negative breast cancer revealed clonal remodeling during brain metastasis (Nature 2010).  PDX analysis also revealed acquired resistance to endocrine therapy is a consequence of ESR1 ligand-binding mutation; ESR1 amplification and most uniquely chromosomal translocation causing fusions between the N terminus of ESR1 and the C-terminus of genes that can confer constitutive transcriptional activity (Cell Reports 2013).  To improve our ability to understand the complex genomic changes he has been working with the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium at the US National Cancer Institute to develop proteogenomic analysis of breast cancer.  This mass spectrometry-based approach recently elucidated the functional consequences of somatic mutations, narrowed candidate nominations for driver genes within large deletions and amplified regions and identified therapeutic targets (Nature 2016, Nature Communications 2017).  His work has been cited over 30,000 times (Google Scholar).  Laboratory web page https://www.bcm.edu/research/labs/matthew-ellis



Speaker
Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction in Clinical Research
"I SPY 2.2: Delivering Personalized Treatment for Breast Cancer When Patients Need it Most"

Laura Esserman, MD
Professor
University California San Francisco

Dr. Laura Esserman, M.D., M.B.A is a surgeon and breast cancer oncology specialist practicing at the UCSF Carol Franc Buck Breast Care Center where she has also held the position of Director since 1996. She co-leads the Breast Oncology Program, the largest of the UCSF Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center's multidisciplinary programs. The program is comprised of 69 faculty members who represent 16 academic specialties and is internationally recognized and well-established with major initiatives in epidemiology, genetics, biology, therapeutics, and clinical cancer care. She is a professor of Surgery & Radiology at UCSF and faculty at the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center where she founded the program in Translational Informatics. As part of this program, her research has focused on bioinformatics, medical and clinical informatics, systems integration, and clinical care delivery.

She has worked at UCSF to develop interdisciplinary teams of clinicians and researchers to bring the best care to patients and find the best platform to integrate translational research and improve the delivery of breast cancer care. In 2005, she received the NCI SPORE Investigator of the Year Award, an internationally recognized honor and designation.

She is the Principle Investigator of the I-SPY TRIAL program, a multi-site neoadjuvant clinical trial that has evolved into a model for translational research and innovation in clinical trial design.Dr. Esserman has recently launched a University of California-wide breast cancer initiative called the Athena Breast Health Network, a project designed to follow 400,000 women from screening through treatment and outcomes, incorporating the latest in molecular testing and web-based tools into the course of care.

Dr. Esserman is nationally and internationally known as a leader in the field of breast cancer and has published over 150 articles in peer-reviewed journals covering all aspects of breast health including information systems, immunology, decision making, health policy and the use of imaging. She speaks extensively at public and private forums within the U.S. and internationally. Overall, Dr. Esserman's research and writing tends to focus on the goal of giving patients better access to accurate information so that they can become partners in their health care.

She is a member of President Obama’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) Working Group on Advancing Innovation in Drug Development and Evaluation, which is studying how the federal government can best support science-based innovation in the process of drug development and regulatory evaluation. In addition, she is a contributing member of a “taskforce” for President Obama’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology.Dr. Esserman received her Bachelor's degree in History of Science from Harvard University and completed her M.D. at Stanford University. She completed her surgery residency and oncology fellowship at Stanford University Medical Center. After her training, she joined the faculty at Stanford and received a Hartford fellowship to attend Stanford Business School where she received her M.B.A. in 1993. She then joined the faculty at the University of California, San Francisco.



Speaker
Workshop
"Capturing patient reported outcomes"

Oluwadamilola Fayanju, MD, MA, MPHS, FACS
Assistant Professor of Surgery
Duke University School of Medicine

Dr. Fayanju is an Assistant Professor of Surgery and Population Health Sciences in the Duke University School of Medicine, Associate Director for Disparities & Value in Healthcare with Duke Forge, and Director of the Durham VA Breast Clinic. Her research focuses on health disparities, aggressive breast cancer variants, and improving value in oncology, particularly through the collection and application of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). In 2019, she was recognized by the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) as an Emerging Leader in Health and Medicine Scholar, selected as one of 10 early- and mid-career researchers nationwide felt to “represent the next generation of leading scientists, health care providers, public health professionals, and policymakers.” Her research, which is currently supported by a K08 career development award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has been recognized with the receipt of two Conquer Cancer Merit Awards from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), and she has been published in a variety of journals including Annals of Surgery, Cancer, and JAMA.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 6
"Novel methods in breast cancer diagnosis"

Michael D. Feldman, MD, PhD
Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
University of Pennsylvania



Discussant
Spotlight Session 15
"Metastasis"

Heide L. Ford, PhD
Professor
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Dr. Heide Ford is a Tenured Professor in the Department of Pharmacology at The University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus.  She received an undergraduate degree in Biology, with a minor in Chemistry, from the State University of New York at Geneseo, and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Biochemistry from the University of Rochester, both in upstate New York.  After completing her postdoctoral fellowship under the mentorship of Arthur Pardee at The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School in Boston, Dr. Ford joined the University of Colorado School of Medicine in 2001.  Since then, she has been running a funded laboratory that focuses on the role of developmental regulators, particularly the Six1/Eya transcriptional complex, in breast and pediatric tumorigenesis and metastasis.  Her work spans diverse areas, from understanding the parallels between normal development and tumorigenesis and basic molecular pathways that contribute to metastasis, including the epithelial to mesenchymal transition, to the more translational aspects of developing novel therapeutics for cancer therapy.  To date, she has published more than 80 peer reviewed primary research articles and reviews, the vast majority related to breast tumor progression. Dr. Ford served as the Chair of the Tumor Progression and Metastasis Study Section of The National Cancer Institute from 2016-2018, and also serves as a senior editor for Molecular Cancer Research and a Deputy Editor for Breast Cancer Research.  In addition, she served as Chair of the Gordon Conference in Mammary Gland Biology in 2017, and thus is involved in national and international leadership positions.  Dr. Ford has mentored numerous undergraduate and graduate students, as well postdoctoral fellows, and was the Director of The Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program at The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus from 2010-2017.  She received The Dean’s Mentoring Award in 2010, and the Pharmacology Teaching/Mentoring award in 2013 and 2016, as well as the Pharmacology Faculty Excellence in Research Award in 2018, and thus is dedicated to developing the careers of young scientists.  Currently she is the Associate Director of Basic Research for the University of Colorado Cancer Center, and holds the David F. and Margaret Turley Grohne Chair in Basic/Translational Cancer Research.



Moderator
Educational Session
"Metastasis -  A Moving Target"

Suzanne AW Fuqua, PhD
Professor 
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Suzanne Fuqua received her Bachelor and Master of Science degrees from the University of Houston, and her PhD in Cancer Biology from the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas.  She joined the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio as a postdoctoral fellow in 1985, attaining the position of tenured Associate Professor in 1994.  She moved with this breast cancer research group to the Baylor College of Medicine in 1999, where she was promoted to the rank of tenured Professor of Medicine.  Dr. Fuqua holds a joint-appointment in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, is a faculty member of the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center, and is Associate Director of Education and Training at the Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center.  Dr. Fuqua has published over 100 papers in peer-reviewed journals, and has authored 50 Books/Chapters. She is internationally known for her research on the discovery of mutant estrogen receptors in metatastic breast cancer, and their clinical significance in breast cancer progression and resistance to hormonal therapies in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.  



Discussant
Spotlight Session 4
"Management of the clinically node positive axilla"

Viviana Galimberti, MD
Director of Breast Cancer Surgery Division
European Institute of Oncology

Viviana Galimberti is Director of Senology Division of IEO, he has a leading role in surgical and clinical, management, research and training in all daily activities. Born in Milan, graduated in Medicine and Surgery at the University of Milan in 1984. In 1989, she has specialized in Surgery at the School of Specialization in General Surgery of the same University and then obtained a Master in Senology (University of Milan, 2007), the Master in Plastic Surgery and the Master in Management Training for Complex Structural Health Manager (University Cattolica, Milan 2008). In December 2013, she achieved the scientific qualification for the functions of University Professor of Class I and II.

She is coordinator of interdisciplinary collaboration with the Department Biomolecular European Institute of Oncology at the Division of Breast.She is Member of the "Task Force on Breast Cancer" of the European Institute of Oncology.Since 2006, she is Member of the Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO); since 2009, she is Member of the Scientific Committee of the International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG); since 2010, she is Member of the European Women's Scientific Committee.Since 2013, she is Scientific Member of Oncoteam of the Italian Society of Oncological Surgery (SICO) and since 2014 she is Member of the Scientific Committee of Italian National Association of Surgeons Senologists (ANISC). Since 2014 she is Member of Milan Breast Cancer Conference Faculty and in November 2017 she is Member of the Scientific Committee of the 9th edition of the Congress "Actuality in Senology", Florence.

Viviana Galimberti's clinical, surgical and research experience was carried out in the field of oncological excellence: since 1985 she has been Assistant Professor at the National Cancer Institute of Milan since 1994 Assistant of the Senology Division in IEO where became Deputy Director (1998) and later Co-Director (2001). Since 2006 she has been Director of the Department of Molecular Senology Unit in IEO and in April 2018 Director of  Senology Division.The strong predisposition to clinical research in the field of surgery has allowed her to design, realize and communicate internationally numerous studies on the most innovative therapies for breast cancer. In multidisciplinary cooperation she participated in the main researches of integration between clinical and laboratory research in the biomolecular field.Galimberti is the author of more than 240 scientific publications and several book chapters.



Moderator
Debate
"All Breast Cancer Patients Should Have Germline Genetic Testing"

Judy E. Garber, MD, MPH
Chief, Division of Cancer Genetics & Prevention
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Judy Garber is a professor of medicine with sub-specialties in breast oncology and in clinical cancer genetics. She has multiple publications in refereed journals, and is generally considered an expert in the treatment of triple negative breast cancer in particular, as well as breast cancers occurring in carriers of mutations in cancer predisposition genes. Dr. Garber has an MPH in chronic disease epidemiology as well, which has enabled her to develop specialized expertise in cancer risk estimation. She runs a clinical program in breast cancer risk estimation and management and in clinical cancer genetics broadly but with a particular focus in breast cancer genetics.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 7
"Novel Models"

Shom Goel, MD, PhD
Group Leader
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre

Dr. Shom Goel is a breast cancer medical oncologist and has conducted clinical training in both Australia and the United States. 

He is a laboratory head. His lab training included a PhD conducted at the Massachusetts General Hospital and a postdoctoral fellow at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

His dual training in in clinical oncology and laboratory science makes him well qualified to act as a discussant of abstracts at the 2020 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.



Moderator
Educational Session
"Special Topics in ER+ Breast Cancer"

Matthew P. Goetz, MD
Professor of Oncology and Pharmacology
Mayo Clinic

Matthew P. Goetz, MD is a consultant in the Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Oncology, at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Dr. Goetz joined the staff of Mayo Clinic in 2003 and holds the academic rank of professor of oncology and pharmacology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science. He is recognized with the distinction of the Erivan K. Haub Family Professorship in Cancer Research Honoring Richard F. Emslander, MD.

Dr. Goetz received his B.A. in music at Wheaton College and his M.D. at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine. He completed an internship in internal medicine and a residency in internal medicine at the University of Michigan in addition to a postdoctoral fellowship in hematology and oncology at Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical Education.

He leads breast cancer research activities at Mayo Clinic where he is chair of the Mayo Breast Cancer Disease Group, co-leader of the Women’s Cancer Program within the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, and Director of the Mayo Breast Cancer SPORE. 

Dr. Goetz has been extensively involved in both translational research as well as in the conduct of early- and late-phase clinical trials, with a focus on germline and tumor factors that alter endocrine responsiveness. A notable area of research focus has been the pharmacogenetics of tamoxifen, where Dr. Goetz has led multiple studies demonstrating the importance of CYP2D6 genetic variation as a predictor of tamoxifen response, resulting in Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guidelines for use of CYP2D6 genotype for tamoxifen dosing. Emanating from this work, and in collaboration with the Developmental Therapeutics Program of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Dr. Goetz has led a team of investigators in the development of a novel formulation of endoxifen for the treatment of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer through both phase I and II clinical studies.   

Matthew Goetz also worked to develop prospective “multi-omic” prospective studies including the Breast Cancer Genome-Guided Therapy (BEAUTY) and PROMISE studies, wherein blood and tumor biopsies are obtained for comprehensive “omic analyses’ and patient derived xenografts (PDX).  Together, the combined “omic”, PDX, and clinical trial outcome data provide a resource to drive new therapeutic approaches for treatment resistant breast cancer.

In addition to his clinical and research roles, Dr. Goetz is active in professional organizations. He currently serves on committees and panels for the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, the NCI Breast Cancer Steering Committee, and the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Obesity, inflammation and breast cancer - what's new"

Pamela Goodwin, MD, FRCPC
Medical Oncologist and Clinician Scientist
Mount Sinai Hospital

Dr. Goodwin has been involved in the field of translational breast cancer research, with a focus on the association of obesity with breast cancer outcomes, for more than 25 years. She has focused on investigating the role of obesity associated factors, such as insulin resistance, glucose and inflammatory markers that may mediate the obesity-breast cancer association. They have confirmed adverse prognostic associations of obesity in breast cancer and identified metabolic factors (insulin/glucose/insulin resistance) as potential mediators. Based on these observations, Dr. Goodwin has initiated a number of trials in the adjuvant and metastatic breast cancer settings to investigate the potential benefits of metformin, an oral diabetes drug that lowers circulating insulin levels, improves glucose and reduces inflammation, on breast cancer outcomes. More specifically, she is the Principal Investigator of a major international adjuvant study of metformin in early breast cancer (CCTG MA.32) being run through the Canadian Cancer Trials Group and the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (NCI). They have completed enrollment of 3649 women, reported planned early analyses of the effect of metformin on physiologic factors, and anticipate final results in 2021. More recent work has focused on the identification of factors associated with late recurrence.



Panelist
View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?

William J. Gradishar, MD
Professor of Medicine
Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center
Northwestern University

Dr. Gradishar’s clinical domain is breast cancer management. His clinical research interest focuses on the development of novel therapies for the treatment of breast cancer. Clinical trials focusing on precision medicine for defining the right therapy, for the right patient at the right time is our goal. To that end, molecular interogation of breast tumors are leading to novel trial design that will hopefully translate into better outcomes for our patients. In conjuction with the developmental therapeutics program, novel agents are being incorporated into clinical trials for patients with both early and late stage disease.



Speaker
Year in Review
"Early breast cancer"

Erika Hamilton, MD
Director, Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Program
Sarah Cannon Research Institute 

Dr. Hamilton joined Sarah Cannon in 2013. Dr. Hamilton cares for patients with breast and gynecologic cancer. As the director of the breast cancer and gynecologic cancer research program, she oversees the program and the clinical trial menu for these cancers across the Sarah Cannon network.  

After receiving an undergraduate degree from Washington and Lee University in Virginia, Dr. Hamilton completed her medical degree and residency from University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. She received her fellowship training in hematology and oncology from Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, where she was recognized as a Top 5 Finalist for Duke's Annual House staff Fellow Teaching Award. She is board certified in internal medicine and oncology. Additionally, she is a partner with Tennessee Oncology, PLLC.



Speaker
AACR Distinguished Lectureship in Breast Cancer Research 

Susan Hankinson, ScD, MPH
Distinguished Professor and Associate Dean for Research
University of Massachusetts

Dr. Hankinson's research addresses the role of endogenous hormones in the etiology of breast cancer in women, including determining the lifestyle and genetic factors that influence hormone levels. This focus reflects a broad interest in the application of biomarkers in epidemiologic research. Much of her research has been conducted with the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and Nurses’ Health Study II (NHSII) cohorts, where she is a senior investigator. She has conducted projects to evaluate the role of endogenous hormones and nutritional factors in breast cancer etiology in postmenopausal women. This work has helped establish circulating sex steroids and prolactin as independent predictors of risk in postmenopausal women; projects are now ongoing to evaluate if these markers can be used to improve breast cancer risk prediction models, which in turn could help guide screening and chemoprevention recommendations. She is al leading several projects assessing plasma and urinary markers that predict risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women – both to identify new biologic pathways and again to improve individual breast cancer risk prediction. Other current interests include evaluating stress markers, risk factors by breast cancer subtype, and incorporating tissue molecular characteristics into her research.



Speaker
Mini Symposium
"APOBEC"

Reuben Harris, BSc, PhD
Professor
Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)
University of Minnesota

Dr. Harris is an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and a Professor of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics, the Associate Director of the Institute for Molecular Virology, and a Member of the Masonic Cancer Center at the University of Minnesota. He received his B.S. (1993) and Ph.D. (1997) degrees from the University of Alberta and performed postdoctoral work at Baylor College of Medicine (1997-1998), Yale University (1998), and Cambridge University (1998-2003). He joined the University of Minnesota as an Assistant Professor in 2003 and was promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure in 2008 and to Full Professor in 2013. Dr. Harris has received numerous grants and awards, including a Searle Scholarship, American Academy of Microbiology Fellowship, American Association for the Advancement of Sciences Fellowship, and a Distinguished McKnight University Professorship. In 2015, he was appointed as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator. Dr. Harris is an Associate Editor for Science Advances and an Editorial Board Member for Journal of Biological Chemistry, Journal of Virology, and Cancer Research. He has published over 180 manuscripts, contributed to 13 patent applications, and co-founded a cancer therapeutics company.

Dr. Harris’s scientific passion is elucidating mechanisms of mutation and establishing relevance to human biology and disease. As a doctoral student, he discovered a novel recombination-dependent mutation process operative in stationary-phase bacteria with implications for antibiotic resistance and microbial evolution. As a postdoctoral fellow, he helped solve an immunology Rosetta stone by discovering the DNA cytosine deaminase activity of AID and proposing a DNA deamination model for antibody gene diversification. Also as a postdoctoral fellow, he discovered the DNA cytosine deaminase activity of several APOBEC family members and, during the transition to faculty, elucidated a new mechanism of antiviral immunity by demonstrating APOBEC3G-catalyzed retroviral cDNA hypermutation. As a Principal Investigator, Dr. Harris has become known for his work on APOBEC enzymes in antiviral immunity, including discovering multiple APOBEC3s in HIV-1 restriction, demonstrating the mechanism by which HIV-1 Vif degrades APOBEC3 proteins, and elucidating the first structures of APOBEC-ssDNA complexes. This body of work has shed light on fundamental mechanisms of antiviral immunity and yielded new strategies for drug development.

In recent years, Dr. Harris’s virology studies have enabled a major breakthrough in cancer research. His group found that APOBEC3 enzymes are responsible for a large proportion of mutations in breast, head/neck, lung, bladder, cervical, and other cancers. Independent work has confirmed these results and indicated that “APOBEC mutagenesis” far exceeds most other sources of mutations in cancer, including those attributable to smoking and UV rays. His team continues to investigate the molecular mechanism of APOBEC-driven cancer mutagenesis in cancer and develop new methods to better diagnose and treat APOBEC-positive tumors. Please see http://harris.cbs.umn.edu for more information on Dr. Harris’s research program.



Speaker - Pro
Educational Session
"Exceptional responders to neoadjuvant chemotherapy"

Joerg Heil, MD, PhD
Head of Breast Unit
University Hospital Heidelberg

As head of the Heidelberg Breast Unit Prof. Heil is in charge to organize all teaching activities for students as well as residents in the field of breast cancer and serves as an adviser and programm commitee member of the German breast cancer symposium (Senologiekongress) where he usually moderate some sessions on breast surgerical oncology topics. German authorities and the German Society of Senology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Senologie) and the University of Heidelberg awarded different teaching and research certificate and awards to him. Moreover Prof. Heil reviewed many scientific manuscript for a number journals (e. g. European Journal of Cancer, Annals of Oncology, Annals of Surgical Oncology, etc.)



Speaker
Educational Session
"Toxicities of breast cancer treatment"

Norah Lynn Henry, MD, PhD
Associate Professor
University of Michigan 

At the 2020 SABCS Dr. Henry has been asked to speak on "Toxicities of Breast Cancer Treatment" in the "Accelerating Recovery after Breast Cancer" educational session. Since completing her fellowship in Hematology/Oncology at the University of Michigan, she has conducted clinical and translational research in breast oncology, with a focus on toxicity of therapy and patient-reported outcomes. She is currently Division Section Head for Breast Oncology at the University of Michigan and Breast Oncology Disease Lead in the Rogel Cancer Center. She is also Co-Chair of the Symptom Control and Quality of Life Committee for the SWOG Cancer Research Network. Her work has primarily been supported by a Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator Award, an American Cancer Society Research Scholar Grant, and a V Foundation Survivorship Grant. The primary focus of her research has been predictors of response to and toxicity of therapy for breast cancer. In particular, Dr. Henry has extensively studied and published on the toxicity of endocrine therapy, including clinical, biochemical, and genetic predictors of discontinuing aromatase inhibitor therapy because of intolerable side effects, mechanisms underlying development of side effects, and management options for treating the toxicity. She is also actively involved in the design and conduct of patient-reported outcomes aspects of oncology treatment trials.



Panelist
"View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?"

Alice Ho, MD, MBA
Radiation Oncologist
University of Pennsylvania 

Dr. Alice Ho, MD, MBA is a faculty member in Radiation Oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital and Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology at Harvard Medical School. She graduated from Tufts University School of Medicine and completed her residency in Radiation Oncology at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York. She has served as faculty at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. 

Dr. Ho is an experienced clinician researcher whose expertise lies in designing and conducting clinical trials that that examine rationale combinations of radiation with immune therapy and DNA repair-based therapy in breast cancer patients. Her other research interests focus on developing novel radiation techniques and identifying biomarkers as surrogates for early detection of toxicities in breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy, particularly in women receiving breast reconstruction and radiation. She has expertise in all aspects of novel radiation techniques, including volumetric modulated arc therapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy. 



Panelist
"View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?"

Sara A. Hurvitz, MD, FACP
Professor of Medicine
University of California, Los Angeles
Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center

Sara A Hurvitz, MD, is Professor of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA); co-director of the Santa Monica-UCLA Outpatient Oncology Practice; Medical Director of the Clinical Research Unit of the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA; and Director of Breast Oncology. Dr. Hurvitz earned her MD from the University of Southern California. She served internship/residency at UCLA 1999-2002, was Chief Resident of internal medicine 2003-2004 and completed a hematology-oncology fellowship at UCLA in 2006. Dr. Hurvitz earned board-certification in internal medicine, hematology, and medical oncology. 

Since joining the faculty at UCLA, Dr. Hurvitz has gained international recognition as an academic expert in breast oncology. She not only has an active clinical practice, but also has extensive experience designing and leading first-in-human through phase III clinical trials. She has served as UCLA principle investigator on over 50 interventional clinical trials, has been chair of six international and four national studies, on the steering committee for 15 international trials and on the Data Safety Monitoring Board for four studies of novel therapeutics. She has personally designed, co-written, obtained funding and completed multiple phase II and III clinical trials of novel targeted therapies (including “TRIO B07,” “KRISTINE” and “neoMONARCH”). She serves on the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program Programmatic Panel, is on the Scientific Committee for TRIO (Translational Research in Oncology, formerly “BCIRG,” an academic not-for-profit academic clinical research organizattion), is on the editorial board for several peer-reviewed journals, including Journal of Clinical Oncology, and serves as an ad hoc reviewer for numerous high impact medical journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet Oncology, Journal of Clinical Oncology, JAMA-Oncology, and Clinical Cancer Research. In addition to her expertise in the clinical development of novel therapeutics, Dr. Hurvitz also has been extensively involved in laboratory-based research. She has been awarded and successfully led and completed several government-funded basic science projects. Additionally, she co-directs the preclinical evaluation of novel targeted therapeutics for breast cancer in the UCLA-JCCC/Translational Oncology Research Laboratory (TORL).  Dr. Hurvitz is committed to the translation of basic laboratory science into innovative clinical testing and the movement of important clinical questions into the laboratory.  Her understanding of both bench and bedside makes her uniquely positioned to lead the successful translation of new discoveries into the clinical realm.



Speaker - Pro
Educational Session
"DCIS"

Eun-Sil Shelley Hwang, MD, MPH
Vice Chair of Research, Chief of Breast Surgical Oncology
Duke University

Dr.  Shelley  Hwang is the  Mary  and  Deryl  Hart  Endowed Professor  of Surgery, Professor  of Radiology,  Vice  Chair  of  Research  for  the  Duke  Department  of  Surgery, and  co-leader  of the Women's  Cancer Program at  the  Duke  Cancer  Institute. Her  national leadership  roles  include membership on the NCI Breast Cancer Steering Committee and the NCCN Screening Guidelines Committee. Her research  interests  include breast  cancer  prevention,  identifying  less  invasive treatments   for   early   stage   breast   cancers,   and   understanding   the   genetic   and   stromal determinants of cancer progression. Dr. Hwang leads an interdisciplinary research team, which includes projects related to oncolytic vaccine therapy for advanced breast cancer. Dr. Hwang is the  national  PI  of  a  cooperative  group  study  through  the  ALLIANCE,  the  COMET trial,  which studies de-escalation  of  treatment  for  in  situ  breast  disease.

She  is  co PI  of the international CRUK  PRECISION  Grand  Challenge  project on early  stage  breast  cancer,  and  she leads the multi-site  NCI  Precancer  Atlas  project which  is  part  of  the  Human  Tumor  Atlas  Network.    

Dr. Hwang was the top funded surgeon-scientist in the country in 2019.  



Speaker
Mini-Symposium
"Is it time to implement lifestyle interventions in the oncology clinic"

Melinda Irwin, MPH, PhD
Professor of Epidemiology
Yale University  



Chair
Spotlight Session 1
"Novel Therapeutics"

Claudine Isaacs, MD, FRCPC
Professor of Medicine
Georgetown University 

Dr. Claudine Isaacs is a Professor of Medicine and Oncology, Associate Director of Clinical Research, and Leader of the  Breast Disease Group at the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center (LCCC) at Georgetown University. She is also the Medical Director of the Jess and Mildred Fisher Center for Hereditary Cancer and Clinical Genomies Research. She has extensive experience in the conduct of clinical trials focusing  on all aspects  of breast cancer and currently serves as Co­ Chair Endocrine Resistance Working Group of the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) and as Co Chair of the Clinical Trials Operations Working Group for.the I-SPY 2 Trial. 

She has authored over 200 peer-reviewed publications and edited two textbooks. She has served on a number of national committees  including the Cancer Education  and the Scientific Program Committees at ASCO; the Breast Oncology Local Diseases Task Force of the Breast Steering Committee of  the NCI, and the ASCO Breast Cancer Guideline Advisory Group.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 11
"Preventing breast cancer through energy balance interventions"

Neil Iyengar, MD
Medical Oncologist
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Omitting radiotherapy in select situations"

Moderator
General Session 2

Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil
Newman Family Professor & Deputy Chair, Department of Radiation Oncology
University of Michigan

Reshma Jagsi, M.D., D.Phil., is Professor and Deputy Chair in the Department of Radiation Oncology and Director of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine at the University of Michigan.  She graduated first in her class from Harvard College and then pursued her medical training at Harvard Medical School.  She also served as a fellow in the Center for Ethics at Harvard University and completed her doctorate in Social Policy at Oxford University as a Marshall Scholar.  Dr. Jagsi’s medical research focuses on improving the quality of care received by breast cancer patients, both by advancing the ways in which breast cancer is treated with radiation and by advancing the understanding of patient decision-making, cost, and access to appropriate care.  Her social scientific research includes research into issues of bioethics arising from cancer care and research regarding gender issues, including studies of women's representation in the medical profession.  She is the author of over 200 articles in peer-reviewed journals, and her research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the American Cancer Society, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and other philanthropic foundations.  She serves as the radiation oncology liaison for the Breast Committee of SWOG and as a representative on the National Cancer Institute’s BOLD task force, and she is also active in NRG and the TBCRC.  She has been elected to the Board of Directors of ASCO and serves on numerous other influential national professional committees. 



Moderator
Special Session
"Global Breast Cancer Screening"

Ismail Jatoi, MD, PhD
Professor and Chief, Division of Surgical Oncology and Endocrine Surgery
UT Health San Antonio

Dr. Ismail Jatoi is Professor and Chief of the Division of Surgical Oncology at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio, Texas. He is the holder of the Dale H. Dorn Endowed Chair in Surgery.  Dr. Jatoi obtained his undergraduate bachelor’s degree from Washington University in St. Louis and his MD and PhD degrees from St. Louis University.  He is a diplomate of the American Board of Surgery and a fellow of the American College of Surgeons.  Dr. Jatoi completed fellowship training in surgical oncology at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London, England.  He served on active duty in the US Army Medical Corps for many years, and retired from the US Army with the rank of Colonel.  During his years on active duty, he received numerous military awards, including the Bronze Star and Legion of Merit.   Dr. Jatoi was formerly a Professor of Surgery at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, Maryland, and continues to hold an Adjunct Professor appointment at that institution.   During his years in Bethesda, he was Director of the Breast Cancer Center at the National Naval Medical Center, and oversaw the High Risk Clinic and the Genetic Testing program which was an integral part of the Breast Care Center.   Dr. Jatoi has had a longstanding interest in breast cancer local therapy and adjuvant systemic therapy, the management of women at increased risk for breast cancer, genetic testing, and cancer screening.  He also has an interest in the design and analysis of cancer clinical trials.  He has published approximately 145 papers and book chapters, and has edited 4 textbooks and a breast surgery atlas.   Dr. Jatoi has previously served on the Breast Cancer Executive Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG).  He now serves on the Breast Cancer Committee of NRG Oncology Clinical Trials Group.  Additionally, he served as Interim Co-Director of the 2014 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS), and continues to serve on its Executive, Planning, and Abstract Review Committees.



Moderator
Educational Session
"Genomic and Epigenomic Alterations in Resistance"

Speaker
Educational Session
"The unique epigenetic state of invasive lobular breast cancers"

Rinath Jeselsohn, MD
Assistant Professor
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute 

Dr. Rinath Jeselsohn is a breast oncologist and physician scientist at the Dana Farber Cancer institute. Her research focuses on mechanisms of tumor progression, metastases and endocrine resistance in breast cancer. She studies genomic and epigenetic alterations in breast cancer, employing pre-clinical models and human derived specimens. Her work in pre-clinical models of endocrine resistance demonstrates novel roles for the RUNX2 and SOX9 transcription factors in tamoxifen resistance. Dr. Jeselsohn's  work has led to the identification of ESR1 mutations that render constitutive activity and endocrine resistance. More recently she has unveiled additional important functions of the ESR1 mutations. 

She has been a moderator for poster sessions at the SABCS in the past and has also presented at the educational session at the SABCS. Last year she presented a talk about resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors in the mini-symposium at the SABCS. Dr. Jeselsohn  has been awarded research funding from the NIH, the Alliance and private foundations.  



Speaker
Educational Session
"Strategies to reduce cardiac toxicity"

Rachel B. Jimenez, MD
Radiation Oncologist
Massachusetts General Hospital

Rachel Jimenez, MD is an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School and a breast radiation oncologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Jimenez obtained her MD degree from Harvard Medical School and completed her radiation oncology residency and chief residency in the Harvard Radiation Oncology program. She serves as the departments associate director of translational medicine and the associate residency program director. 

Her primary research interests are focused on the reduction of late toxicity associated with radiotherapy for breast cancer.



Moderator
Clinical Research Workshop

Chairman
Debate
"All Breast Cancer Patients Should Have Germline Genetic Testing"

Virginia Kaklamani, MD
Professor
UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr Kaklamani is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology/Oncology at UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center and is the Leader of the Breast Cancer Program. Dr Kaklamani completed her medical training with honors at the University of Athens and her residency in Internal Medicine at Newton-Wellesley Hospital in Boston, MA. She completed her fellowship in hematology/oncology at Northwestern University. She also received a Master of Science in Clinical Investigation from Northwestern University. She was Head of the Translational Breast Cancer Program at Northwestern University and co-director of the cancer genetics program at the same institution. Her research interests include studying high risk families and identifying genetic mutations that are associated with an increased risk for breast, colon and prostate cancer.  She has identified several genetic mutations related to obesity which increase the risk of breast cancer. Dr Kaklamani is a clinical investigator with expertise in designing clinical trials with targeted agents. 



Moderator
Special Session - Presented by Tigerlily Foundation & AACR

Maimah Karmo
Founder/CEO of the Tigerlily Foundation (Tigerlily) 
Stone Ridge, VA



Speaker
William L. McGuire Memorial Lecture

Mary-Claire King, PhD
Professor
University of Washington



Chair
Spotlight Session 5
"Current Concepts and Controversies in Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS)"

Tari A. King, MD
Chief, Division of Breast Surgery
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Tari A. King is the Anne E. Dyson Professor of Surgery in the Field of Women’s Cancers at Harvard Medical School, the chief of the Division of Breast Surgery and the associate chair of multidisciplinary oncology in the Department of Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the chief of breast surgery at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center. She is also the director of the Breast Cancer Personalized Risk Assessment, Education and Prevention (B-PREP) Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Dr. King received her medical degree from University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and completed a general surgery residency at Ochsner Clinic Foundation Hospital (now Ochsner Medical Center) in New Orleans. Dr. King completed both a surgical research fellowship and a breast surgery clinical fellowship at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Her clinical and research efforts focus on tailoring local therapy and improving clinical management strategies for women at high risk of developing breast cancer. Dr. King currently serves on the Steering Committee for the TBCRC, the NCI Breast Oncology Local Disease Task Force and the Executive Council of the SSO.



Chair
Spotlight Session 12
"Chronic Health Conditions and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivorship"

Jennifer Klemp, PhD, MPH
Professor of Medicine
University of Kansas Cancer Center

Jennifer Klemp, PhD, MPH, is a Professor of Medicine, in the Division of Medical Oncology, the Director of Cancer Survivorship, and the Co-Program Leader for Cancer Prevention and Control at the University of Kansas Cancer Center. Her clinical-research practice focuses on cancer genetics and cancer survivorship.   

Dr. Klemp serves on a number of national boards, is a subject matter expert in cancer genetics and survivorship, has peer reviewed funding including an NCI R01, and has presented nationally focusing on cancer genetics, shared decision-making regarding options to manage cancer risk and survivorship issues, and the development and implementation of cancer genetics, survivorship, and navigation programming.



Moderator
General Session 3

Ian E. Krop, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Ian Elliott Krop, MD, PhD, is the Associate Chief, Division of Breast Oncology. He is also an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Krop is a translational investigator focused on the development of novel molecularly targeted therapies and immunotherapies for breast cancer, and elucidating the mechanisms of resistance to these treatments. The majority of his effort is concentrated in the area of HER2+ breast cancer. He was a leader in the development of the antibody-drug conjugate trastuzumab emtainsine (T-DM1).Dr. Krop currently serves as Chief Scientific Officer for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium. He is a member of the National Cancer Institute’s Breast Cancer Steering Committee and co-chairs its Immuno-Oncology Working Group. He is also the co-vice chair for correlative science for the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology. He is a member of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Data Monitoring Committee.Dr. Krop is a graduate of Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He trained at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He completed a medical oncology fellowship at Dana-Farber.    



Discussant
Spotlight Session 5
"Epidemiology of disease progression"

Swati Kulkarni, MD
Professor of Surgery
Northwestern University

Dr. Swati Kulkarni, Professor of Surgery at Northwestern University, received her Doctor of Medicine degree from the Medical College of Pennsylvania, completed her General Surgery residency at New York Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Medical College of Cornell University and completed a Breast Surgical Oncology Fellowship at Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine. Prior to returning to Northwestern, she was an Assistant Professor of Surgery and Oncology at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center and an Associate Professor at University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. Dr. Kulkarni is an active clinical and translational researcher. Her research focuses on the relationship between obesity and breast cancer risk, tamoxifen resistance, and identifying novel agents to treat and prevent breast cancer. She is currently the PI of an NCI-funded multicenter Phase II study to evaluate the protective effect of a tissue selective estrogen complex (Duavee) in women with newly diagnosed Ductal Carcinoma in Situ.



Speaker
Debate
"Against - All Breast Cancer Patients Should Have Germline Genetic Testing"

Allison W. Kurian, MD, MSc
Associate Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology & Population Health
Stanford University School of Medicine

Dr. Kurian’s research focuses on the identification of women with elevated breast and gynecologic cancer risk, and on the development and evaluation of novel techniques for early cancer detection and risk reduction. As Director of the Stanford Women’s Clinical Cancer Genetics Program, her practice centers on women at high risk of breast and gynecologic cancers. 

Dr. Kurian earned her M.D. degree at Harvard Medical School, completed residency in Internal Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, then trained in Medical Oncology and earned her M.Sc. degree in Epidemiology at Stanford University. She is an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation. She has published more than 180 peer-reviewed articles, many in high-impact journals such as JAMA, the Journal of Clinical Oncology and the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Kurian’s research has been supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, California Breast Cancer Research Program, Komen for the Cure Foundation, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, BRCA Foundation and others. Dr. Kurian serves on several national committees that advance the clinical and research mission of women’s cancer genetics: she develops evidence-based practice guidelines as a member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network and has led the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s Scientific Program Committee for Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention. 



Chair
Spotlight Session 8
"Endocrine Resistance: Emerging Mechanisms and Therapies "

Carol A. Lange, PhD
Professor
University of Minnesota

Carol Lange's research program in the areas of breast and ovarian cancer is focused on the integrated actions of growth factor- or stress-activated protein kinases and steroid hormone receptors (SRs). They have made critical contributions to the understanding of mechanisms of ligand-independent SR action and their role in cancer progression. Estrogen receptor α (ER) and progesterone receptors (PRs) are context-dependent transcription factor partners that are essential for development of the breast and reproductive tract. Altered sex hormone levels contribute to cancer risk in these tissues and drive early tumor progression. The presence of abnormally activated ERs and imbalanced/activated PR isoforms in tumors can dramatically influence response to endocrine or other therapies. All SRs can rapidly activate cytoplasmic protein kinases and act as “growth factor sensors”. In this role, SRs are heavily phosphorylated by mitogenic protein kinases (AURKA, MAPKs, AKT, CDKs) that are frequently elevated and activated in breast and reproductive tract cancers. Phosphorylation of SRs alters their binding partners and promoter selection and influences cancer cell fate/plasticity by regulating genes that specify proliferative, pro-survival, metabolic, and stem cell programs via expression of autocrine and paracrine factors. Identifying the essential pathways and partners will enable the targeting of key signaling molecules in addition to SRs, which is predicted to halt cancer progression, prevent recurrence, and increase patient survival.

As a research advisor and T32-supported Training Program Director, she is committed to providing high quality training and mentoring in a supportive environment that fosters creativity and embraces diversity. Outside the research lab, she encourages opportunities for her advisees to meet other scientist peers and future colleagues, and fully support their participation in professional development activities. Over the past 21 years as an independent investigator, she has mentored trainees at all levels, including as primary advisor to 13 predoctoral and 13 postdoctoral trainees, and has served as faculty mentor to numerous junior faculty members in her leadership roles within the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) Internal Advisory Board and the University of Minnesota Masonic Cancer Center (MCC), where she serves as the Director of the Targets of Cancer Training Program (NIH T32) and co-lead of the Cellular Mechanisms Program. She has a long-standing interest in professional career and leadership development, and has routinely organized events designed for young people pursuing research careers both locally and nationally, and through her career-long affiliation with The Endocrine Society. 



Discussant
Spotlight Session 7
"Neoadjuvant trials"

Adrian Lee, PhD
Professor
University of Pittsburgh


Speaker
Mini-Symposium
"What else is in the imaging: How AI can improve mammograms?"

Constance Lehman, MD, PhD
Professor of Radiology and Chief of Breast Imaging
Harvard Medical School 
Massachusetts General Hospital

Dr. Lehman is a presenter at the meeting.  She is a full professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and Chief of Breast Imaging at Mass General Hospital, Boston, MA. 

She has published over 250 peer reviewed articles in her field and given 100s of national and international CME lectures and presentations.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 15
"Metabolism"

Brian D. Lehmann, PhD
Research Assistant Professor
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Dr. Lehmann is a seasoned Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. He is a member of the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center,  Breast Cancer Research Program, the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium and the Vanderbilt Breast SPORE program. He has integrated his expertise in molecular genetics with bioinformatics to molecularly sub-classify triple-negative breast cancer into distinct transcriptional subtypes. Through multidisciplinary collaborations, preclinical studies have been translated into several completed and ongoing clinical trials investigating both targeted therapy and immunotherapy in metastatic TNBC patients.  He has served on review panels for Susan G. Komen, Department of Defense, METAvivor, Prevent Cancer and Breast Cancer Now. 



Discussant
Spotlight Session 1
"Novel Targets"

Bora Lim, MD
Assistant Professor
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Bora Lim is an Assistant Professor at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; she is a translational investigator who seeks to discover a novel therapeutic strategy to halt or treat aggressive breast cancer by apoptosis (effecitve caner cell killing) induction strategy. She also studies new ways of delivering these novel agents, and determine a correct target population using new diagnostic methods such as liquid biopsy, single cell genomics. She actively runs five active investigator-initiated clinical trials and associated biomarker studies. She is an avid member of IBC and TNBC working groups, serves as a faculty of advanced breast cancer clinic.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Treatment of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer - advances and challenges"

Nancy U. Lin, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Harvard Medical School

Nancy Lin, MD is the Associate Chief of Breast Medical Oncology for the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Director of the Metastatic Breast Cancer Program, and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.  Her research is focused upon developing novel therapies for patients with metastatic breast cancer and in understanding mechanisms of therapeutic resistance. 

She has led multiple trials of novel systemic approaches for metastatic breast cancer, including patients with breast cancer brain metastases. She has had national and international leadership roles, including serving as the overall PI of several multi-center studies, co-chair of the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology metastatic working group, Chair of the Friends of Cancer-American Society Modernizing Eligibility Criteria Project-Brain Metastasis Working Group, and membership in national and international guidelines committees for the management of metastatic breast cancer. 

Dr. Lin is also experienced in tissue- and blood-based translational research, and with the construction and analysis of clinical databases.  She is the PI of the breast oncology-specific tissue banking protocol at Dana-Farber, Co-Chair of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Clinical Data and Tissue Users’ Committee, and PI of active protocols allowing prospective consent for research biopsies with linked clinical data across all stages of breast cancer, and of the EMBRACE (Ending Metastatic Breast Cancer for Everyone) metastatic cohort study. She serves as the DF/HCC institutional PI for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium.  

Dr. Lin received her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and medical degree from Harvard Medical School. She subsequently completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and fellowships in hematology and medical oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.



Speaker
Translational Science Forum
"Replication stress response defects predict responses to ICT in non-hypermutated tumors"

Shiaw-Yih Lin, PhD
Professor 
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Shiaw-Yih Lin is a tenured full professor in the Department of Systems Biology at MD Anderson Cancer Center. During his PhD studies at MD Anderson Cancer Center from 1996-1999, he carried out projects focused on the identification of novel cancer genes and biomarkers in breast cancer. As a postdoctoral fellow at Baylor College of Medicine (2000-2003), He trained with Dr. Stephen Elledge in the field of DNA damage response and cancer genetics. Since establishing his own research group at MD Anderson, he has built upon his research strengths in the areas of genome maintenance, systems and translational DNA repair and signature-guided precision cancer therapy. Dr. Lin's lab has identified many key players in DNA damage response network and characterized their critical roles in tumor suppression (e.g., Cancer Cell, 2006; Nat Cell Biol. 2009). Moreover, by utilizing powerful systems biology approaches, they have developed effective and novel strategies to target cancers via their defects of DNA damage and stress responses, including developing signatures and targeting drugs against cancer with homologous recombination (HR) defects (Nat Commu, 2014), mismatch repair (MMR) defects (Cancer Cell, 2020) and replication stress response (RSR) defects (Cell Rep, 2018). He has been playing an integral role in bridging the basic research with preclinical and clinical studies.His research accomplishments in these areas have led to his being awarded several major grants (NIH R01 grants, an Era of Hope Scholar Award and an Innovator and Scholar Concept Award from the DOD, and a Research Scholar Award from the American Cancer Society). All of these accomplishments demonstrate the high productivity of his research program.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Metastatic TNBC – What’s new on the horizon?"

Jennifer Litton, MD
Professor 
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center 

Jennifer Keating Litton, MD is Vice President, ad interim, of Clinical Research and a Professor in the Department of Breast Medical Oncology and Clinical Cancer Genetics at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.  She holds an additional faculty position in the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at The University of Texas Health Sciences Center in Houston.  She attended Duke University, with degrees in English and in History and The University of Massachusetts Medical School.  After completing an Internal Medicine Residency at Baylor College of Medicine, she then served as Chief Medical Resident.  She completed a fellowship in Medical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center before joining the faculty in the Department of Breast Medical Oncology where she is Chief, Section of Clinical Research and Drug Development.  Her research interests include the treatment of young breast cancer patients, including the treatment of breast cancer during pregnancy, treatment-related infertility, hereditary cancer syndromes, immunotherapy and triple negative breast cancer.  She is the principle investigator for multiple clinical trials.  She serves as a member of the National Cancer Center Network National Guidelines Panel for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndromes as well as an Editor for the NIH Physician Data Query (PDQ) and has been appointed to the Breast Immuno-Oncology Task Force of the National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Steering Committee and Co-Chair of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) Breast Cancer Subcommittee.  She has authored multiple abstracts, peer-reviewed journal articles, and book chapters.  Dr. Litton has served on the boards of the St. Luke’s Episcopal Health Charities, the Children’s Fund, Suites of Hope and is an alumni of the Texas Lyceum.  

She lives in Houston with her husband Todd and their three children.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Rationale for combination therapies (including pre-clinical data)"

Sherene Loi, MBBS, FRACP, PhD
Medical Oncologist
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre

Prof. Sherene Loi is a Medical Oncologist specialized in breast cancer treatment as well as a clinician scientist with expertise in genomics, immunology and drug development. Her work is focused on developing new therapeutic approaches that may improve outcomes of breast cancer patients. 

After completing Medical Oncology specialist clinical training in 2003, she undertook a PhD and postdoctoral studies at the Institut Jules Bordet in Brussels, Belgium (2003-2012). In 2013, she returned to head the newly created Translational Breast Cancer Genomics and Therapeutics laboratory at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, as well as Consultant Medical Oncologist in the Breast Service and head of the Breast Cancer Clinical Trials Unit. She is recognised internationally as a leading clinician scientist whose work has led to new insights into the immunology field in breast cancer. As a result of her research, she lead a number of international breast cancer clinical trials in immunotherapy. To date, she has published over 210 peer-reviewed research articles with a lifetime H index of 70. 

Her recent work has been highly influential with 24,179 total citations and 17,367 (72%) within the past 5 years (Google Scholar). She is on the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Australia New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group (BCT Australia/NZ), which is the largest breast cancer clinical trials cooperative group in Australia and Co-Chairs the Scientific Executive Committee and the Translational Working Group of the International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) based in Bern, Switzerland which conducts academic global breast cancer clinical trials in over 16 countries. Prof. Loi is the current holder of the Inaugural National Breast Cancer Foundation (NBCF) of Australia Endowed Chair and a research fellow of the Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF), New York. She is also on the Scientific Committee for Breast Cancer for the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).



Speaker
Educational Session
"Epigenetic therapy against high-risk breast cancer"

Mathieu Lupien, PhD
Senior Scientist
Princess Margaret Cancer Centre 



Discussant
Spotlight Session 2
"Predictive biomarkers in hormone receptor positive breast cancer"

Luca Malorni, MD, PhD
Medical Oncologist
Hospital of Prato

Dr. Luca Malorni is a Senior Medical Oncologist at the Oncology Department and research team leader at the Translational Research Unit, both at Hospital of Prato, directed by Dr Angelo Di Leo. His principal research interest is focused on mechanisms of resistance to endocrine and targeted therapies in breast cancer. He has extensive experience in the management of clinical trials in this field, as well as in pre-clinical models of drug resistant breast cancer.   

As a research fellow at Baylor College of Medicine under the supervision of Dr C. Kent Osborne and Dr Rachel Schiff, he fostered an interest in estrogen receptor plasticity during the development of endocrine resistance. With the support of the American Italian Cancer Foundation and the Susan G. Komen Foundation, he focused on the modulation of transcription  factor AP-1 as a mechanism of endocrine resistance. They were able to show that AP-1 is crucial in the development of the endocrine resistant phenotype, with these results published in Molecular Cancer Research.    

Key to establishing his status as an independent investigator was the opportunity to devise and conduct the translational research program of the phase III CONFIRM study (a seminal registration trial of fulvestrant in metastatic breast cancer). In collaboration with the Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, they performed a gene-expression study on tissue samples from a cohort of patients enrolled in CONFIRM and were able to identify gene-signatures of poor prognosis. Additionally, they validated the over-expression of the transcription factor AP-2gamma (TFAP2C) as an adverse prognostic factor. The results of this collaboration have been published in Clinical Cancer  Research.    

In 2012, he became interested in an emerging class of compounds, CDK4/6 inhibitors, which at the time had just commenced phase II clinical trials in breast cancer. Well aware of the clinical development program and potential of these agents, they designed and conducted an academic, multicenter trial aimed to deliver useful clinical information not addressed by the registration trials. This led to TREnd, a study that showed for the first time that palbociclib has the potential to reverse endocrine resistance as it retains high clinical activity when combined with an endocrine treatment received beyond disease progression. The results of this trial, upon which he served as principal investigator, have been published in Annals of Oncology.   

Building on the expertise he developed as principal investigator for TREnd, and accepted the role of International principal investiator of the PYTHIA trial, a phase II biomarker study of palbociclib and fulvestrant for patients with endocrine resistant luminal metastatic breast cancer, co-sponsored by the IBCSG and BIG. The trial has completed accrual and the first data will be presented at SABCS 2020. Importantly, this will be the first independent, academic collection of molecular data within a clinical trial with a CDK4/6  inhibitor.   

In 2012, in parallel to these clinical activities, they also initiated at our translational research unit a pre-clinical program focusing on mechanisms of acquired resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors. To this end they have established and characterized seven ER+ breast cancer cell line models with acquired resistance to palbociclib. By studying these models, they have developed clinically-oriented biomarkers that have already achieved preliminary clinical validation. One such biomarker, RBsig, appears to be of particular relevance in ER+/HER2+ breast cancer, a peculiar histological subtype. This concept rapidly turned into an innovative clinical trial lead by IBCSG (TOUCH, NCT03644186), where I serve as international co-PI.



Moderator
Educational Session
"De-escalation of Surgical Therapy: What Does the Data Support"

Eleftherios P. Mamounas, MD, MPH
Director Comprehensive Breast Program
Orlando Health UF Health Cancer Center

Terry Mamounas, MD, MPH, FACS, received his medical degree from the University of Athens Medical School in Athens, Greece, in 1983 and a Masters of Public Health from the University of Pittsburgh in 1989. He completed his general surgery residency at McKeesport Hospital in Pennsylvania. He then completed a clinical oncology research fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh and a surgical oncology fellowship at the Department of Surgical Oncology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute in New York. He is currently the Medical Director or the Comprehensive Breast Program.

Dr. Mamounas has authored and coauthored more than 300 abstracts, peer-reviewed manuscripts and book chapters and has given numerous lectures at national and international meetings. As part of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project, his clinical research has been funded over the past 20 years by several National Cancer Institute grants and more recently by a Komen for the Cure grant. He has served on the editorial boards of several oncology journals and is a past associate editor of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. He has received several awards and distinctions and has been listed in The Best Doctors in America consistently since 2001. He is considered one of the nation's best cancer physicians.

Dr. Mamounas holds memberships in several professional societies, including the American College of Surgeons, the Society of Surgical Oncology and the American Society of Clinical Oncology. 



Speaker

Educational Session
"Double edged swords in cancer progression and treatment – Lessons learned from investigating IL-1 and IFN signaling"

Sandra McAllister, PhD
Assistant Professor
Harvard Medical School
Brigham & Women's Hospital

Dr. McAllister received her undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and completed her Ph.D. studies in molecular and cellular biology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.  She joined Robert Weinberg’s laboratory at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research as a postdoctoral fellow where she established new pre-clinical models to study breast cancer pathophysiology.  She joined the faculty of Brigham & Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in 2009, and is also an affiliate member of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, an associate member of the Broad Institute, and a member of the Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. Dr. McAllister’s lab group studies breast cancer metastasis. Their research efforts are currently focused on understanding how age affects the immune microenvironment to shape cancer progression and therapeutic responses.  Dr. McAllister is an American Cancer Society Scholar, the 2013 recipient of the AACR Gertrude B. Elion Cancer Research Award, and an Era of Hope Award Scholar.  In 2012, she received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. Government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their careers, from President Obama.



Discussant
Special Session - Presented by Tigerlily Foundation & AACR
"Session 3: Policy Change to End Disparities"

Maria Elena Martinez, PhD
Professor in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine
UC San Diego

 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Special topics in metastatic ER+ breast cancer"

Discussant
Spotlight Session 8
"Emerging new therapies"

Ingrid A. Mayer, MD, MSCI
Professor of Medicine
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

Dr. Mayer is a Professor of Medicine and Ingram Professor of Cancer Research, and a breast medical oncologist by training. She is currently the co-Leader of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC)/ Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) Breast Cancer Program and co-PI of the VICC Breast Cancer NCI Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE).

Dr. Mayer obtained her medical degree from the Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil in 1993. Thereafter, she came to the United States for her post-graduate training (internship, residency, chief-residency and Hematology/ Oncology fellowship) at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), between 1994 and 2001. In September 2003, Dr. Mayer was recruited to VUMC/ VICC, and successfully completed a Master of Science in Clinical Investigation (MSCI) Program at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in May 2006.

Since then, her research endeavors and grant funding from the NCI, BCRF, SU2C and Susan G. Komen have been focused on 1) identification of targetable pathways addressing endocrine therapy resistance in ER+ breast cancers, 2) novel immunotherapy strategies in HER2-negative breast cancers, 3) chemotherapy resistance in triple negative breast cancers, and 4) biomarker prediction of treatment response in HER2-negative breast cancers. She has been a Principal Investigator on more than 90 breast cancer clinical trials, spanning from phase I through phase III trials.

In view of her clinical trial experience, Dr. Mayer was appointed Chair of the VICC Data Safety and Monitoring Committee (DSMC) in 2010. She became a Komen Scholar in 2018.  Nationally, aside from being an active member of the ECOG-ACRIN Breast Core Committee and the VICC representative of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Breast Cancer Panel of Experts, Dr. Mayer has been highly involved with the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC), and is currently part of its Steering Committee.



Speaker 
Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction in Basic Science
"SERMs or SERDs for metastatic breast cancer . . . YES, may be the answer"

Donald P. McDonnell, PhD
Glaxo-Wellcome Professor of MCB, Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology
Duke University School of Medicine

In Dr. McDonnell's presentation, he is going to discuss the recent history of the development of Selective Estrogen Receptors Down regulators (SERDs) and Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs) for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. There are 11 drugs of this class(s) in development and his group has been directly involved in the development of five of these drugs and our technology has been used in the development of most of the others. This expertise puts him in a good position to overview the field and inform colleagues how and where the field is going.



Speaker - Con
Educational Session
"DCIS"

Sarah McLaughlin, MD
Professor of Surgery
Mayo Clinic

Sarah McLaughlin is a Professor of Surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville Florida. She graduated from the University of Missouri-Kansas City Medical School with distinction. She completed her General Surgery residency training at the Mayo Clinic in Florida and then a Breast Surgical Oncology fellowship at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. She has an active breast surgery clinical and research practice and has a history of intramural, state and federal/NIH research funding with a specific focus on issues affecting breast cancer survivorship especially lymphedema diagnosis   and treatment.   

Dr. McLaughlin is a member of multiple national organizations and is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. She serves on several national committees interested in the education of breast surgeons, breast surgery and CGSO fellows, and general surgery residents. Within the Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO), she is the immediate past Chair of the Training Committee and in that role was involved in the organization of the Fellows Institutes I and II as well as the CGSO SSO Board Review course. She currently serves as a Councilor on Executive Council for the SSO. She also serves as an editorial board member for the Annals of Surgical Oncology. She has previously been a member of the SSO CME committee and the breast disease site work group. In addition, she is the Chair of The American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) Continuing Medical Education (CME) Committee, the Editor for the ASBrS Breast   Education Self-Assessment Program (BESAP), and a past member of the editorial board for the Surgical Council on Resident Education (SCORE) overseeing general surgery residency curriculum development. On behalf of the SSO and the ASBrS she is currently leading the task force to develop Focused Practice Designation in breast surgery criteria for the American Board of Surgery.  Previously she was the Program Chair for the 2015 ASBrS Annual Meeting. She also participated in   the creation, validation, implementation, and critical revision of the SSO/ASBrS breast surgery fellowship curriculum and case minimums in 2014 and 2019.   

Within the Mayo Clinic, she is a member of the Mayo Clinic Board of Governors and a member of the Florida Executive Operations leadership Team, Division Chair of General Surgery Mayo Clinic Florida, and the Medical Director of the Robert and Monica Jacoby Center for Breast Health.  She is the course director for the Mayo Clinic Multidisciplinary Update in Breast Health annual CME meeting and has served as the Program Director for the General Surgery Residency for 6 years. Further the Mayo Clinic has recognized Dr. McLaughlin as a Mayo Clinic Foundation Scholar, Outstanding Course Director, Faculty Teacher of the Year, and Outstanding CME Faculty. The city of Jacksonville recognizes Dr. McLaughlin as a Health care Hero for her contributions to the Jacksonville breast cancer community.   



Discussant
Spotlight Session 12
"Quality of life and support in breast cancer care"

Michelle Melisko, MD
Clinical Professor of Medicine
University of California San Francisco

Dr. Melisko is a nationally recognized expert in the management of patients with breast cancer. She focuses on investigating new treatments for early and late stage disease, and particularly in patients with central nervous system metastases. She has been the principal investigator for multiple clinical trials for patients with brain metastases and leptomeningeal disease and has published on novel agents to treat these conditions and on methods to quantify and molecularly characterize tumor cells isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid. She also conducts research in symptom management, patient reported outcomes, and survivorship issues in breast cancer patients. She is the Medical Director of the UCSF Breast Care Center (BCC) Survivorship Program, the co-chair of the Translation Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO) Interest Group, and a founding member of the PRO working group within the ISPY2 clinical trial investigating novel agents in the neoadjuvant setting. She is also a member of the NCCN Survivorship panel and has published multiple papers on symptom reporting and management.



Speaker 
Educational Session
"Targeting adaptive resistance"

Gordon Mills, MD, PhD
Director, Precision Oncology
Knight Institute
Oregon Health Sciences University

Dr. Gordon B. Mills earned his M.D. and Ph.D. in biochemistry and completed his training in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Alberta. Prior to moving the Knight Cancer Institute, Dr. Mills was at the MD Anderson Cancer Center, the number one ranked Cancer Center in the United States. He fulfilled multiple roles including founding chair of the Department of Systems Biology, co-Director of the Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan Institute for Personalized Cancer Therapy co-Director of the Kleberg Center for Molecular Markers and holds the Olga Keith Wiess Distinguished University Chair for Cancer Research at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. At the Knight Cancer Institute at the Oregon Health Sciences University, Dr. Mills is Director of Precision Oncology and SMMART trials. He is responsible for the implementation of an integrated program of tumor analysis, decision-making and implementation of novel precision oncology trials. The key goal will be to use serial tumor and liquid biopsies to evaluate and target adaptive responses in real time to interdict cancer evolution. Dr. Mills research ranges across: 1) translating the cancer genome through mechanistic studies determining the role of genomic and other aberrations present in patient tumors, 2) identification and validation of therapeutic targets emphasizing mechanisms of resistance and rational combination therapy to overcome emerging resistance in evolving cancers, 4) developing, validating, and implementing molecular markers; and 5) integrating data through a cancer systems biology approach into robust predictive mathematical models. The overarching goal is to perform deep molecular analysis of each patient “to let the patient teach us what is important”. This process is facilitated by the implementation and integration of a comprehensive suite of high-throughput technologies including assessment of genomic aberrations, transcriptional profiles, functional proteomics and metabolomics, and drug screening using conventional and high content imaging systems. Dr. Mills has also implemented a comprehensive functional genomics program designed to distinguish drivers from passengers and identify their therapeutic liabilities. Dr. Mills is recognized as one of the most highly quoted scientists in the world with over 1000 publications. He also holds more than 20 patents. His work has been continuously He is funded by multiple grants for over 30 years.  Dr. Mills efforts have been recognized in the Komen Foundation’s Brinker Award for Scientific Excellence and the Finneran Family Prize for Translational Research. He has been very successful in supporting training, mentoring, and career development for young scientists including graduate students, fellows, and junior faculty. The majority of his trainees have developed successful research careers rising through the ranks to full professor, department chairs, and institute directors. Based on this role, Dr. Mills has been nominated for and awarded multiple mentoring awards, including the Stand Up 2 Cancer Laura Ziskin Prize for Mentoring.



Speaker
Plenary Lecture
"Local Regional Management Following Neoadjuvant Therapy: Minding the Knowledge Gaps"

Chair
Spotlight Session 14
"Immune Biomarkers and Immune Oncology"

Elizabeth A. Mittendorf, MD, PhD
Rob and Karen Hale Distinguished Chair in Surgical Oncology
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Elizabeth Mittendorf is the Robert and Karen Hale Distinguished Chair in Surgical Oncology and Associate Chair for Research in the Department of Surgery at the Brigham and Women ' s Hospital. She is also the Director of the Breast lmmuno-Oncology program and Co-Director of the Breast Cancer Clinical Research Program at the Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center. Dr. Mittendorf received her medical degree from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine where she also completed a residency in General Surgery. She then served on active duty in the United States military before completing a fellowship in Surgical Oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Mittendorf also holds a PhD in Immunology from the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston. She is board certified by the American Board of Surgery.   

Dr. Mittendorf focuses her clinical and laboratory efforts on the study of breast cancer with a specific interest in immunotherapy. She has been the principle on a number of clinical protocols including the phase Ill PRESENT (Prevention of Recurrence in Early-Stage, Node-Positive Breast Cancer with Low to Intermediate HER2 Expression with NeuVax Treatment) study, and a multicenter phase II trial investigating the efficacy of a CD8+ T cell eliciting vaccine in combination with trastuzumab which is based on preclinical data generated in her laboratory and follows a phase I trial she conducted demonstrating the combination to be safe.  This trial is supported by a Breakthrough Award from the Department of Defense. She was recently awarded a prestigious Stand Up to Cancer award to support the conduct of a multicenter trial evaluating the combination of ipatasertib and atezolizumab in triple negative breast cancer. This trial is also informed by work from her laboratory showing transcriptional regulation of PD-L1 expression through the P13K/AKT pathway. The current focus of her laboratory work is to determine the impact of standard and experimental therapies on immunologic aspects of the tumor microenvironment in order to inform rational trials of immunotherapeutic agents in breast cancer. She is also investigating novel targets for vaccine strategies in addition to her work evaluating breast tumor immunology and immunotherapy, 

Dr. Mittendorf has published extensively on a multitude of subjects related to breast cancer and surgical management of the disease to include incorporation of biologic factors into staging, management of the axilla, and surgery following receipt of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. 



Speaker - Con
Educational Session
"Exceptional responders to neoadjuvant chemotherapy"

Monica Morrow, MD
Chief, Breast Surgical Service
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Monica Morrow MD is Chief of the Breast Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and the Anne Burnett Windfohr Chair of Clinical Oncology.  She is also Professor of Surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College.  She is the author of more than 500 peer reviewed publications, reviews and book chapters on topics related to the local therapy of breast cancer.  Her expertise has been recognized with the Gianni Bonadonna  Award from ASCO, the Susan G Komen Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction in Clinical Research, the William McGuire lectureship at SABCS, the John Wayne Clinical Research Award from the SSO, Presidency of the SSO, and the St. Gallen International breast Cancer Award. 



Chair
Spotlight Session 15
"Triple Negative Breast Cancer: Metabolism and Metastasis"

Stacy Moulder, MD
Professor
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Moulder completed her fellowship in Hematology/Oncology at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, where she also obtained a Master’s of Science in Clinical Investigation. She is a medical oncologist who exclusively sees breast cancer patients and has been appointed within the Breast Medical Oncology program for 15 years at MD Anderson Cancer Center. She has served as the Chief of the Section of Clinical Research in Breast Medical Oncology and, most recently, as co-lead of the MD Anderson Breast Cancer Moon Shot Program. She maintains a research interest in drug development with novel targeted therapies for the treatment of triple negative breast cancer, predominately as targeted therapy trials for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer or neoadjuvant trials in patients with localized, chemotherapy insensitive disease. Her research interests are focused on the mesenchymal subtype of TNBC, which includes metaplastic breast cancer, a particularly aggressive, chemotherapy refractory form of TNBC. 



Discussant
Spotlight Session 3
"De-escalating therapy in early and late stage disease, and continuing antibody therapy post progression"

Rashmi Krishna Murthy, MD, MBE
Assistant Professor
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center



Speaker 
FDA and Breast Cancer Workshop
"Trastuzumab Deruxtecan"

Preeti Narayan, MD
Medical Officer
Food and Drug Administration



Discussant 
General Session 2

Marian L. Neuhouser, PhD, RD
Program Head
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Marian L. Neuhouser, Ph.D., R.D., is a Professor and Program Head in the Cancer Prevention Program, Public Health Sciences Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Dr. Neuhouser leads the Hutch’s Cancer Prevention Program, the first such National Cancer Institute–funded program in the U.S. Her research focuses on the role of nutrition and energy balance (obesity) in breast and prostate cancer prevention. Her portfolio of NIH funded research  has included a variety of study designs ranging from controlled feeding trials focused on understanding the mechanistic role of foods and nutrients in  human physiology and metabolism, to large, population-based studies that evaluate the associations of these dietary factors with cancer risk and cancer mortality. Dr. Neuhouser’s professional service includes serving on the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, serving as President of the American Society for Nutrition 2016-2017 and current service as an Associate Editor for Journal of Nutrition. She has served on numerous NIH grant review panels and is a current member of NIH’s Kidney, Nutrition, Obesity and Diabetes (KNOD) Scientific Review Group. Dr. Neuhouser is a current member of the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.  Dr. Neuhouser is a Member of the Women’s Health Initiative Steering Committee and she Co-Chairs the Prevention & Epidemiology Committee for the SWOG Cancer Research Network. Dr. Neuhouser completed her undergraduate training in Community Nutrition at University of California, Davis and received her PhD in Nutritional Sciences at the University of Washington, followed by postdoctoral training in Nutritional Epidemiology at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Dr. Neuhouser has authored over 350 peer reviewed publications and has been continuously funded by the NIH for over 20 years.



Moderator
Educational Session
"The Disparity Crisis in Breast Cancer"

Discussant
Special Session - Presented by the Tigerlily Foundation & AACR
"Session 1: Socio-Economic Access Matters"

Lisa Newman, MD, MPH
Chief, Breast Surgery
Weill Cornell Medicine
New York Presbyterian Network

Dr. Newman is a surgical oncologist with a practice dedicated to breast cancer management. In August 2018 she was appointed to oversee the breast program for the Weill Cornell Medicine-New York Presbyterian Hospital Network, serving its Manhattan, Queens and Brooklyn sites. Previously, she worked at the Henry Ford Health System, where she served as breast program director, covering multiple hospitals throughout Michigan since 2015. She is also the Founding Medical Director for the International Center for the Study of Breast Cancer Subtypes, currently headquartered at Weill Cornell Medicine. Dr.  Newman was Professor of Surgery and Director of the Breast Care Center for the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where she also served as Program Director for the Breast Fellowship from 2002 to 2015. Dr. Newman holds a Masters Degree in Public Health from Harvard University, and she also obtained her undergraduate education at Harvard.  She attended medical school and completed her general surgery residency training at the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn. Dr. Newman was remained at Downstate following completion of her postgraduate training, and served as an Assistant Professor of Surgery with this program for several years. She pursued fellowship training in surgical oncology at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center 1997-99, followed by joining the faculty as an Assistant Professor; she continues to hold an Adjunct Professorship with M.D. Anderson. She has held Adjunct Professorships with the University of Michigan School of Public Health as well as the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. She served as Associate Director for the Walt Breast Center at Wayne State University/Karmanos Cancer Institute for two years after relocating to Michigan in 2000. 

Dr. Newman’s primary research has focused on race/ethnicity-related variation in breast cancer risk and outcome, the evaluation and management of high-risk patients; broadened applications for neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and special surgical techniques such as the skin-sparing mastectomy and lymphatic mapping/sentinel lymph node biopsy.  Her extensive research related to disparities in breast cancer risk and outcome has been published in numerous peer-reviewed medical journals and was featured in CNN’s documentary “Black in America 2”. She has also been the featured breast cancer medical expert for NBC’s “Today Show” (2014; 2017; 2019) as well on CBS Nightly News (2015). She maintains a very active community service record, and currently serves as Chief National Medical Advisor for the Sisters Network, Inc., a national African American breast cancer survivors support organization. 

She oversees an international breast cancer research and training program involving a network of physicians and facilities in Ghana, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Uganda, Mexico, and the Caribbean. This program has focused in the study of triple negative breast cancer in women with African ancestry. Her work has been acknowledged with several awards, such as “Top Blacks in Health Care 2018”; Phenomenal African American Women of 2018”; “Esteemed Women of Michigan 2018”; Crain’s “Health Care Hero” in 2017; 2012 Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation Hero Award; and the 2010 National Medical Association Woman in Medicine Award. She was named “Michiganders of the Year” in 2011; and an “Oprah’s Angels” for breast cancer work by Oprah magazine in 2012. She has received the University of Michigan 2012 Community Service Award; the 2013 Sarah Goddard Power Award for Advancement of Women in Academic Medicine; and the 2015 Harold Johnson Diversity Award. She has been named one of Detroit’s “Top Docs” and “Top Doctors of America” for several years. Dr. Newman has also been awarded the coveted title of Komen Scholar, and is a member of the Komen Scientific Advisory Board. Most recently, Dr. Newman was named a 2019 “Rock Star of Science and Medicine” by the European Society for Medical Oncology.”

Dr. Newman has been appointed to multiple national and regional leadership positions, including the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women; the NIH’s Clinical Trials Advisory Committee; the Advisory Council to the National Institute of Minority Health and Disparities; chairperson for the Breast Committee of the Michigan Cancer Consortium. She has held leadership positions in the most prominent of oncologic academic and advocacy organizations: Society of Surgical Oncology (Executive Council; Disparities Committee chairperson); American Society of Clinical Oncology (Health Disparities Advisory Group chair; Health Services Committee chair); American Cancer Society (National Assembly;  Board of Directors for the Great Lakes Division); American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (Executive Council; Special Populations Committee chair). Dr. Newman’s editorial board service includes: Annals of Surgical Oncology (Breast Section Editor); Cancer (Disparities Section Editor); Journal of Clinical Oncology (Breast Section editorial board member) and she is currently on the editorial board for JAMA Surgery. Dr. Newman is chair of the AACR Regional Advisory Group on Africa, and she is co-Chair for the AACR 2020 Cancer Disparities Symposium. In October 2019 she was appointed 2nd Vice President-Elect for the American College of Surgeons.



Speaker
Educational Session
"DNA repair defect as a driver of therapy resistance"

Serena Nik-Zainal, MB BChir, PhD
CRUK Advanced Clinician Scientist
University of Cambridge

Following a first-class degree in preclinical science, Serena Nik-Zainal obtained a medical degree from the University of Cambridge in December 2000, sponsored by Petroliam Nasional Berhad Malaysia (PETRONAS) and as a Fellow of the Cambridge Commonwealth Trust. She trained in general internal medicine before specializing in Clinical Genetics and obtained the Certificate of Specialist Training in Clinical Genetics in January 2013 and has been an Honorary Consultant in Clinical Genetics at Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust since February 2013. She recruited patients with DNA repair defects as part of the Insignia project until December 2018.

She undertook a PhD at Wellcome Sanger Institute (WSI) exploring cancer using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology in 2009. She was heavily involved in development of the whole genome sequencing (WGS) somatic variation pipeline and the development of an array of analytical principles that revealed the underlying abnormal biology of tumors – including generalized mutational signatures, imprints left by mutagenic processes that have occurred through cancer development, a novel phenomenon of localized hypermutation termed “kataegis”, and developed the principles of constructing a cancer evolutionary tree from a single tumour sample.

In a post-doctoral role and as an early investigator, she continued to explore large cancer datasets, leading production and analyses of the largest cohort of WGS cancers of a single tissue-type, of 560 breast cancers. Dr. Nik-Zainal began pursuing experimental validation of mutational signatures, dissecting mechanisms of mutagenesis using cellular models. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) were used to generate CRISPR-Cas9 knockouts of DNA repair genes and were systematically treated with a variety of environmental mutagens. The results from these endeavors will serve as a reference resource of validated human mutational signatures.  

As a Group Leader at the University of Cambridge, her team has continued to advance the field of mutational signatures through a combination of computational and experimental approaches, to ultimately create clinical applications. With five patent filings made in the last 36 months, they are unravelling mechanisms underpinning mutagenesis, developing machine-learning based clinical algorithms, and are actively connecting with clinical trials to validate our algorithmic tools, to better inform patient stratification for therapeutic intervention. 



Discussant
Spotlight Session 6
"Novel imaging agents"

Haydee Ojeda-Fournier, MD
Medical Director Breast Imaging
UC San Diego Health

Haydee Ojeda-Fournier, MD, is a board-certified radiologist. She specializes in breast imaging and the detection of breast cancer utilizing mammography, sonography, molecular breast imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Among the procedures she performs are image-guided biopsies (utilizing multiple imaging modalities), fine needle aspiration, and biopsies of axillary (armpit) lymph nodes.

Before joining UC San Diego Health, Dr. Ojeda was on the clinical faculty at the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Ojeda earned her medical degree from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. She completed her diagnostic radiology residency and women's imaging fellowship at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. She is board certified in diagnostic radiology.Dr. Ojeda is a member of the American College of Radiology, Association of University Radiologists, Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology, Radiological Society of North America, Society of Breast Imaging, American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine, and International Society of Magnetic Resonance Imaging.



Discussant
Special Session - Presented by Tigerlily Foundation & AACR
"Session 2: Not a One Size Fits All: Personalized Medicine for the Underserved"

Olufunmilayo Olopade, MD, FACP 
Walter L. Palmer Distinguished Service Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics
The University of Chicago



Discussant
General Session 1

Ruth O'Regan, MD 
Professor
University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center

Dr. Ruth O’Regan is the Division Head of Hematology/Oncology and Palliative Care in the Department of Medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. Dr. O’Regan is an internationally recognized breast-cancer physician and researcher with particular expertise on breast cancers that are resistant to current therapies. 

A native of Dublin, Ireland, Dr. O’Regan previously was a professor of hematology and medical oncology at Emory University, where she held the Louisa and Rand Glenn Family Chair in Breast Cancer Research. Additionally, Dr. O’Regan was the medical director at Glenn Family Breast Center of Emory University, director of the Breast Cancer Translational Research Program at the Winship Cancer Institute, and chief of hematology and medical oncology at the Georgia Cancer Center for Excellence at Grady Memorial Hospital. In her dedication to training the next generation of physicians, she served as vice chair for educational affairs in the department of hematology and medical oncology and as director of the hematology/oncology fellowship program at Emory University. With a highly active research program focused on identifying mechanisms of resistance to breast-cancer therapies and development of new therapies, Dr. O’Regan has been principal investigator for numerous grants and clinical trials. Her research group has made significant discoveries about the role of the PI3 Kinase-mTOR pathway in triple-negative breast cancer, showing that mTOR inhibition can sensitize breast-cancer cells to upstream growth-factor inhibitors. These discoveries resulted in a novel clinical trial for patients with metastatic breast cancer. 

Dr. O'Regan was previously a member of the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium Planning Committee, in addition to serving on numerous other committees, study sections and advisory boards. 



Moderator
The Year in Review

Charles Kent Osborne, MD
Director
Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. C. Kent Osborne was born in 1946 in St. Louis, Missouri. He received his AB and MD degrees from the University of Missouri, both with honors. He completed his internship and residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1974, and then spent three years as a clinical associate at the Medicine Branch, Breast Cancer Section of the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland. In 1977, he took his first faculty position at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, where he rose to the rank of Professor and became Director of the Division of Medical Oncology in 1992. In 1999, Dr. Osborne and his team moved to Baylor College of Medicine to develop a new multidisciplinary Breast Center and in 2005 he was named Director of the new Dan L Duncan Cancer Center at Baylor College of Medicine which achieved “comprehensive” designation under his leadership in 2015.

Dr. Osborne is a physician scientist who has focused on breast cancer his entire career. His research interests include understanding the biology of breast cancer and then developing new treatment approaches for the disease. He has published extensively on the mechanisms by which hormonal therapies such as tamoxifen inhibit breast cancer growth and how breast cancers become resistant to these therapies. He has also studied the role of various growth factors in breast cancer development and progression, and more recently how these other growth factors can interact with estrogen to stimulate tumor growth. His laboratory is also focusing on the mechanisms by which breast cancers develop resistance to HER2-targeted therapies. For more than a decade Dr. Osborne was Chairman of the Breast Cancer Committee for the Southwest Oncology Group, where he directed numerous nationwide clinical trials investigating new treatment strategies for breast cancer patients. He was the Principal Investigator of the Baylor Breast Cancer Specialized Program of Research Excellence grant (for the last 20 plus years) which has been funded since the Program began in 1992. He recently stepped down from SPORE, so he could focus on other BCM Cancer Center needs / projects. 

Among his previous awards are the Komen Foundation Award, the Brinker International Award for Breast Cancer Research, the European Institute of Oncology Annual Breast Cancer Award, and the ASCO Bonadonna Award for Breast Cancer Research. Most recently, he received the 2018 AACR Distinguished Award for Extraordinary Scientific Achievement and Leadership In Breast Cancer Research.

At Baylor College of Medicine, he is the Director of the Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center and Professor of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology. He currently holds the Tina and Dudley Sharp Chair in Oncology at Baylor College of Medicine. 



Speaker
FDA and Breast Cancer Workshop
"Sacituzumab"

Christy Osgood, MD
Medical Officer
Food and Drug Administration



Speaker
Educational Session
"Population based trends"

Julie R. Palmer, ScD, MPH
Karin Grunebaum Professor in Cancer Research
Boston University School of Medicine

Dr. Palmer is a cancer epidemiologist, with research projects spanning cancer early detection, etiology, and survivorship. Her primary focus is on elucidating reasons for the disproportionately high incidence of hormone receptor negative breast cancer in African American women and on understanding and reducing racial disparities in breast cancer mortality. She is a founding leader of the Black Women’s Health Study (BWHS), a prospective cohort study of 59,000 African American women who enrolled in 1995 and have been followed by biennial questionnaire since that time. Her breast cancer research within the BWHS includes work on risk prediction models for breast cancer in African American women, identifying differences in childbearing patterns as a contributing cause to the excess incidence of estrogen receptor negative breast cancer in African American women, and investigating the interrelationships of type 2 diabetes, obesity, and inflammation on breast cancer risk. Her current grants support work on somatic mutations, epigenetics, and gene expressions profiles in breast cancer tumors from African American women, setting the stage for a better understanding of the role of epidemiologic and genetic factors in etiology and prognosis. In 2017, Dr. Palmer was awarded the AACR Distinguished Lectureship on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities.  She has served on many NIH and external advisory committees, including as Chair of the NIH Cancer, Cardiovascular, and Sleep Epidemiology Study Section, 2015-2017, and Co-Chair of a Working Group for the National Cancer Advisory Board, NCI, 2018-2019.



Speaker
Clinical Science Forum
"Interpreting reports"

Ben Ho Park, MD, PhD
Professor of Medicine
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

Dr. Park attended The University of Chicago for his A.B. degree, followed by dual training at The University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine where he received both his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees. Dr. Park then trained in Internal Medicine and Hematology/Oncology at  The University of Pennsylvania prior to completing a post-doctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Dr. Bert Vogelstein at Johns Hopkins.   Dr. Park then joined the faculty in the Breast Cancer Program at The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins and was Professor of Oncology, Associate Director of Education and Research Training and Associate Dean of Postdoctoral Affairs for the School of Medicine prior to joining Vanderbilt University Medical Center in 2018. He is currently the Donna S. Hall Chair in Breast Cancer, Professor of Medicine and Associate Director for Basic and Translational Research in the Division of Heme/Onc, Co-Leader of the Breast Cancer Research Program, Associate Director for Translational Research and Director of Precision Oncology at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center. His research program involves identifying and validating genetic targets for breast cancer therapy and diagnostics. In particular, Dr. Park has pioneered the use of “liquid biopsies” to help guide future management of breast cancer therapies. He has also led the formation and implementation of molecular tumor boards at Hopkins and other institutions, and more recently at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center.



Speaker
Basic Science Forum
"Spatial variance signatures/Intra-tumor zonation in TNBC"

Morag Park, PhD
Director
McGill University
Goodman Cancer Research Centre 

Dr. Morag Park is a Professor in the Departments of Oncology and Biochemistry at McGill University, she was Scientific Director of the Institute of Cancer Research for the CIHR (2008-13) and is now Director of the Goodman Cancer Research Centre at McGill University (2013-present). She is a research leader in the field of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) and signal transduction. She cloned the Met RTK, which is now a key therapeutic target in oncology. She established the Breast Cancer Functional Genomics Group at McGill. She has pioneered studies of the breast tumour and immune microenvironment and was the elected chair of the Tumour Microenvironment Network of the American Association for Cancer Research (2015-2017). She has more than 200 papers.



Speaker
Translational Science Forum
"The making of an ADC"

Paul Parren, PhD
Head of R&D
Lava Therapeutics 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Body image and sexual health"

Ann H. Partridge, MD, MPH
Medical Oncologist
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Partridge received her MD from Cornell University Medical College in 1995. She completed her residency in internal medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and went on to complete fellowships in medical oncology and hematology at DFCI. Later she received an MPH from Harvard School of Public Health. She is a medical oncologist focusing on the care of women with breast cancer, and she has a particular interest in the psychosocial, behavioral, and communication issues in breast cancer care and treatment.



Moderator
Translational Science Forum
"Antibody-Drug Conjugates, Better Together"

Mark Pegram, MD
Associate Dean, Clinical Research Quality
Stanford University
Stanford Cancer Institute

Dr. Mark Pegram is the Susy Yuan-Huey Hung Professor of Medical Oncology, the Associate Director for Clinical Research at the Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Institute, and the Associate Dean for Clinical Research Quality at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Pegram has an extensive background with >25 years of experience in development of experimental therapeutics in the field of oncology, through the conduct of clinical/translational research studies. His initial foray into this field was as a member of the team (led by Dr. Dennis Slamon at UCLA, and a team of scientists at Genentech) that spearheaded the pre-clinical and clinical development of trastuzumab (Herceptin). Dr. Pegram's work was among the first to describe synergism between cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents and anti-ERBB2 antibodies, and he was the lead author on the publication of the first human clinical trial to test the combination of chemotherapy plus Herceptin, which is now a backbone for ERBB2+ disease management. Dr. Pegram has been the principal investigator or co-principal investigator on numerous clinical/translational projects, many of which resulted in “first in human” phase I or IB clinical trials including SCH8500 (replication deficient adenovirus containing full-length p53 tumor suppressor gene cDNA), NB1011 (a thymidylate-synthase activated prodrug), AS1402 (humanized anti-muc1 monoclonal antibody), lapatinib (an ERBB2 kinase inhibitor), PR-104 (hypoxia-activated prodrug), AZD0530 (Src kinase inhibitor), bevacizumab (humanized anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody), pertuzumab (second generation anti-ERBB2 monoclonal antibody), MEDI-4276 (biparatopic, humanized anti-ERBB2 antibody drug conjugate), CD137-agonist antibody utolimumab, and humanized monoclonal antibody directed against CD47 (Hu5F9-G4). Dr. Pegram has contributed a recent invited review on the topic of HER2 antibody-drug conjugates.



Speaker
Translational Science Forum
"B-cells and follicular T cells regulate responses to immune checkpoint inhibitors in breast tumors and melanomas"

Moderator
Special Session - Presented by Tigerlily Foundation & AACR

Charles M. Perou, PhD
Professor 
University of North Carolina

Dr. Perou’s research crosses the disciplines of genomics, genetics, cancer biology, bioinformatics, epidemiology, and clinical research. A major contribution of his has been in the characterization of the genomic diversity of breast tumors, which resulted in the discovery of the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer. He has authored more than 400 peer reviewed articles, and is an inventor on multiple USA and European patents. He is currently the Co-Director of the new Computational Medicine Program at UNC, Faculty Director of the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center (LCCC) Bioinformatics Group, and Co-Leader of the LCCC Breast Cancer Research Program. He is the Vice Chair for Correlative Sciences for the ALLIANCE Breast Committee, and Steering Committee Member of the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC). His training history includes a Bachelor’s degree in Biology from Bates College, a PhD in Experimental Pathology from the University of Utah, and then postdoctoral work in the laboratory of David Botstein (then at Stanford University). He has won numerous awards including the 2009 AACR Outstanding Investigator Award for Breast Cancer Research, the 2011 Danaher Scientific and Medical Award, the 2012 European Institute of Oncology Breast Cancer Therapy Award, the 2016 Jill Rose Award for Distinguished Biomedical Research from the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, the 2016 Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction from the Susan G. Komen, and the 2018 Distinguished Scientist Award from the Association of American Cancer Institutes.  Lastly he has been named a Thomson Reuters Most Highly Cited Researcher in Clinical Medicine for 2014-18, where his work has received more than 145,000 total citations. 



Panelist
View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?

Martine J. Piccart-Gebhart, MD, PhD
Scientific Director
Institut Jules Bordet

Martine J. Piccart, M.D., Ph.D., is honorary professor of oncology at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) and scientific director at the Jules Bordet Institute (Brussels/Belgium). Earning her medical degrees at ULB and oncology qualifications in New York and London, she is also a member of the Belgian Royal Academy of Medicine. She held presidencies of the European CanCer Organisation (ECCO), the European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) and served on the American Society of Clinical Oncology Board (ASCO). Presently she is a member of the Board of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) which nominated her as fellow of the AACR Academy in 2013.

A strong advocate for and leader of international research collaborations, Prof. Martine Piccart, together with Prof. Aron Goldhirsch, created the Breast International Group (BIG) in 1996 to foster collaboration and accelerate the development of better breast cancer treatments. The organisation, chaired by Prof. Piccart, became an international not-for-profit organization in 1999, and today unites 59 academic breast cancer research groups from around the world. BIG has more than 30 clinical trials under its umbrella at any one time, and several of BIG’s past studies are considered landmark and practice-changing.

Prof. Piccart’s relentless drive for results has made her an international leader, who has forged collaborations all over the world and has successfully managed a number of high-profile, Phase 3 clinical trials that have involved multiple international investigators and institutions. Those clinical trials include HERA (HERceptin Adjuvant), MINDACT (Microarray In Node-Negative and 1 to 3 Positive Lymph Node Disease May Avoid Chemotherapy), and ALTTO (Adjuvant Lapatinib and/or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimisation).

In 2014, BIG launched AURORA, an innovative molecular screening programme aiming to understand the molecular aberrations driving breast cancer metastasis and why tumours respond differently to therapy. Over 80 hospitals associated with 10 BIG research groups in 11 countries are taking part. Prof. Piccart believes this type of research will enable much more effective treatment of metastatic breast cancer in the future. 

Throughout her career, Prof. Piccart has been honoured with numerous prestigious awards for her research contributions, including the Jill Rose Award for distinguished biomedical research (2009, New York, USA), the William L. McQuire Award in recognition of her contribution in breast cancer research (2009, SABCS, San Antonio/Texas, USA), the Umberto Veronesi Award for the Future Fight Against Cancer (2012, Cancun, Mexico), the David A. Karnofsky Memorial Award in recognition of innovative clinical research and developments that have changed the way oncologists think about the general practice of oncology (2013, ASCO, Chicago, USA), the Susan G. Komen’s Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction (2015, SABCS, San Antonio/Texas, USA) and, the 2017 St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Award and most recently, the 2018 Prix Leopold Griffuel for translational and clinical research delivered by the “Association pour la Recherche sur le Cancer” in France and the KNAW Bob Pinedo Cancer Care Award in November 2018 in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

An accomplished clinician and scientist, Prof. Piccart is author or co-author of over 520 publications in peer-reviewed journals.  



Discussant
Spotlight Session 4
"Management of the axilla in early stage disease"

Melissa Pilewski, MD, FACS
Associate Attending, Department of Surgery
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Pilewskie received her B.S. in biology from the University of Michigan, a medical degree from The Ohio State University, completed her general surgical residency training at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, finished her training with a fellowship in surgical breast oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in NYC and is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons.  Following her clinical fellowship, she joined the faculty at MSKCC and is now an Associate Attending on the Breast Service in the Department of Surgery. During her training Dr. Pilewskie has been the recipient of the Breast Cancer Achievement Award from the Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium and was two-time recipient of the Conquer Cancer Foundation of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Merit Award.  In addition to her role as a surgical breast oncologist, Dr. Pilewskie has established an active role in clinical research, which has focused on the development of a structured high-risk breast clinic, the RISE program, where she studies breast cancer risk assessment, appropriate imaging recommendations, and risk-reduction strategies. She currently acts as the site Principle Investigator for a randomized window trial assessing the feasibility of a topical chemoprevention agent and has strong interest in testing novel risk-reducing strategies, including the use of aerobic exercise training for risk reduction. She has authored or co-authored over 50 articles, reviews, and book chapters on breast cancer management and research and she has presented her work both nationally and internationally over the past 10 years. Her practice also includes teaching and mentoring the next generation of surgeons at both the medical student and fellow level. 



Speaker
The Year in Review
"Basic science"

Helen Piwnica-Worms, PhD
Professor 
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

 Dr. Piwnica-Worms is Professor of Experimental Radiation Oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. She is an American Cancer Society Research Professor and a member of the National Academy of Medicine. Dr. Piwnica-Worms completed a B.A. in Biology at St. Olaf College, a Ph.D. degree in microbiology and immunology at Duke University Medical School and a postdoctoral fellowship at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. She was Instructor of Pathology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute from 1988-1989 prior to moving to Tufts University Medical School where she was Assistant Professor of Physiology followed by Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Hospital, Boston where she was Associate Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics. In 1994, Dr. Piwnica-Worms moved to Washington University School of Medicine where she was the Gerty T. Cori Professor, an HHMI Investigator and served as Chair of the Department of Cell Biology and Physiology as well as Associate Director of Basic Science at the Alvin J. Siteman Comprehensive Cancer Center.  She relocated her research program to MD Anderson in 2013 where she holds the Senator A. M. Aikin Jr. Distinguished Chair.  Her laboratory focuses on identifying alterations with functional significance to the development and progression of breast cancer. A major effort is directed towards elucidating the contribution made by heterogeneity (genomic, phenotypic, spatial and compositional) in both the tumor and its microenvironment to cancer progression, metastasis and resistance to therapy. A second major effort is understanding how fasting and certain diets protect stem cells and promote organismal survival in the presence of lethal forms of DNA damage.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 5
"Biologic insights and changes in the parous breast"

Kornelia Polyak, MD, PhD
Professor of Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Polyak obtained her M.D. degree in 1991 from the Albert Szent-Györgyi Medical School in Szeged Hungary and her Ph.D. degree in 1995 from Cornell University Graduate School of Medical Sciences/Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York. Dr. Polyak completed her postdoctoral training in Baltimore at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center in the laboratory of Drs. Bert Vogelstein and Ken Kinzler. Dr. Polyak joined the faculty of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School in 1998 as Assistant Professor of Medicine and was promoted to Professor in 2011. Dr. Polyak’s laboratory is dedicated to the molecular analysis of human breast cancer with the goal improving the clinical management of breast cancer patients. Her lab has devoted much effort to develop new ways to study tumors as a whole and to apply interdisciplinary approaches. Using these methods Dr. Polyak’s lab has been at the forefront of studies analyzing purified cell populations from normal and neoplastic human breast tissue at genomic scale and in situ at single cell level and to apply mathematical and ecological models for the better understanding of breast tumor evolution. She has also been successful with the clinical translation of her findings including the testing of efficacy of JAK2 and BET bromodomain inhibitors for the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer in clinical trials. Dr. Polyak have received numerous awards including the Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research in 2011, the 2012 AACR Outstanding Investigator Award for Breast Cancer Research, and the Rosalind Franklin Award in 2016. She is also a 2015 recipient of the NCI Outstanding Investigator award.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Personalized treatment of early stage HER2-positive breast cancer"

Aleix Prat, MD, PhD
Head Medical Oncology Department
Hospital Clínic Barcelona

Since 2014, Aleix Prat has been  the Head of the Medical Oncology Department of the Hospital Clínic Barcelona (Spain), Head of the Translational Genomics and Targeted Therapeutics in Solid Tumors Lab at IDIBAPS and Tenure-track 2 lecturer at the University of Barcelona. No more than 25% of his time is devoted to patient care and teaching and the remaining 75% of his time is focused on research activities which also include formal didactic work. Senior Specialist in Medical Oncology with a high medical training as evidenced by the 17th position out of num. 8,000 people in the Spanish National Medicine Exam (also known as MIR) obtained in 2003 and the 15 published articles in which he participate's actively during his residency in medical oncology at the Hospital Vall d'Hebron (Spain), under the supervision of Dr. Joseph Baselga (2004-2008). As scientific coordinator of the Scientific Board of the Spanish Breast Cancer Cooperative Research Group (SOLTI) that performs clinical trials of excellence in oncology, he was named member of the Executive Board of The Breast International Group (BIG) in 2018, an international non- profit organization that includes more than 56 cooperative groups from around the world. Since May 2019 he left the scientific coordination to assume the Presidency of the Governing Board of SOLTI. Over his career he obtained a world-wide prestige as a research scientist in the field of breast cancer genomics and biomarker development. Dr. Prat's interest in the genomic field grew out during his fellowship and after completing the Master of Molecular Oncology at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, CNIO (Madrid, 2008). During his fellowship at Vall d´Hebron, he published 15 articles, including 2 studies published in Annals of Oncology (IF: 7.040), where he established the value of a biomarker known as a CA-125 for predicting the risk of tumor recurrence in patients with ovarian cancer. In 2008, he became a postdoctoral research associate (2008-2012) at the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA) in the Laboratory of Prof. Charles M. Perou, a world- renowned translational researcher in breast cancer. During this postdoctoral experience, he discovered and characterized a new molecular subtype of breast cancer, known as a Claudin-low (Prat et al. Breast Cancer Research 2010; Citations: 1,518). In addition, he participated in The Cancer Genome Atlas breast cancer project (Nature 2012; Citations: 4,661), which is the most important molecular characterization study that has ever been performed in breast cancer. Since 2007, he has actively taken part in a total of 152 publications (43 as 1st author and 21 as senior author. 34 (†corresponding author) with a total impact factor of 1.411 and Score-H of 49 with 15.047 citations and140 communications in international congresses. Consequently, he has been invited to give conferences around the world as an expert in breast cancer genomics, moderator and discussan like ASCO Annual Meeting or San Antonio Breast Cancer Meeting (SABCS). In 2013, Dr. Prat presented the doctoral thesis at the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB) titled “Molecular characterization of the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer” (qualification-cum laude), and was awarded the Extraordinary Prize of Doctorate in the field of Medicine.

As Tenure-track 2 lecturer in the University of Barcelona, he is particularly interested in education and teaching. In 2008, he published a self-assessment book for medical oncology fellows and physicians known as “OncoQuest”. This book was an instant hit with more than a 1,000 copies sold to date. Since 2014, he is an associate professor at the University of Barcelona and has directed 3 doctoral theses and currently supervising the PhD thesis of 3 students. His areas of interest are diagnostics and treatment of breast cancer and the subtypes of intrinsic breast cancer (Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2-enriched and basal-like). His research is leading is based on using genomic data to guide the design of clinical trials and biomarker development in order to identify more optimal treatments for patients with cancer. Specifically, its main strategic lines are: Assist in implementing and developing genomic platforms applicable in daily clinical practice; Participate in prospective and retrospective studies where scientists genomics of tumors analyzed; Validation of predictive genomic biomarkers and / or forecasts in clinical trials and evaluate gene expression data as a tool to identify new mechanisms of sensitivity/drug resistance and/or new therapeutic targets as immunotherapy.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Novel biomarkers in immune therapy response"

Discussant
General Session 4

Lajos Pusztai, MD, DPhil
Professor of Medicine
Yale Cancer Center

Dr Pusztai is Professor of Medicine at Yale University, Director of Breast Cancer Translational Research and Co-Director of the Yale Cancer Center Genomics Genetics and Epigenetics Program. He is also Chair of the Breast Cancer Research Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG). Dr. Pusztai received his medical degree from the Semmelweis University of Medicine in Budapest, and his D.Phil. degree from the University of Oxford in England. His research group has made important contributions to establish that estrogen receptor-positive and-negative breast cancers have fundamentally different molecular, clinical and epidemiological characteristics. He has been a pioneer in evaluating gene expression profiling as a diagnostic technology to predict chemotherapy and endocrine therapy sensitivity and have shown that different biological processes are involved in determining the prognosis and treatment response in different breast cancer subtypes. He made important contributions to clarify the clinical value of preoperative (neoadjuvant) chemotherapy in different breast cancer subtypes. Dr Pusztai is also principal investigator of several clinical trials investigating new drugs, including immunotherapies for breast cancer. He has published over 300 scientific manuscripts in high impact medical journals including the NEJM, JAMA, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Nature Biotechnology, PNAS, Lancet Oncology and JNCI. He is among the top 1% most highly cited investigators in clinical medicine according to a 2015 Thomson Reuters report. He is member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Breast Cancer Research Foundation and a Susan Komen Scholar. 



Moderator
Educational Session
"Accelerating Recovery After Breast Cancer"

Susan W. Rafte, BA
Patient Advocate
Baylor College of Medicine

Susan Rafte is a 24-year metastatic breast cancer survivor. Since her diagnosis in 1994, she has been an active community volunteer, patient advocate and has dedicated and volunteered most of her time to raise awareness about breast health, provide peer-to-peer support to help others who have been touched by breast cancer and be the patient voice at the table to forward breast cancer research. Alongside her sister, Jane Weiner, they co-founded Pink Ribbons Project, a non-profit organization. During its 21-year existence it raised more than $6,000,000 to help in the fight against breast cancer. Several awards demonstrate her contributions in breast cancer advocacy and education. As an involved patient advocate and through her experiences that she has gained by being a part of the breast cancer community, she is enabled and qualified to serve as an advocate on scientific research committees to represent the voice of other patients and is experienced to be a mentor to review scientific grant applications to ensure terminology is understandable to a general, non-scientific audience and to convey the importance and overall impact of the project on breast cancer research and patient needs, concerns and care.

She can also develop and review the scientific sections to help communicate the importance of the project to breast cancer patients and their families and discuss other ways to be involved with the research grants. On a regular basis, she is committed to participate in meetings, to provide to the Investigators and others involved in the research, patient focused feedback and input on the impact of the project on patients by identifying the translational potential of this research. Susan Rafte is firmly committed to helping achieve the goals of breast cancer research.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 5
"Refining risk prediction and decision making"

Eileen Rakovitch, MD
Professor
Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre



Speaker
Educational Session
"Rescue DNA repair pathway and tumor immunity"

Manjeet K. Rao, PhD
Professor 
UT Health San Antonio

Their overall goal is to develop more potent and less toxic drugs for treating adult and pediatric cancer patients. They have employed unbiased high throughput genomewide functional screens as well as small molecule inhibitor screens to identify novel targets that may play critical roles in breast cancer, medulloblastoma, and osteosarcoma growth, progression and drug sensitivity.  Their research endeavors have resulted in clinical development of an anti-depression for treating triple negative breast cancer patients (https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/clinical-trials/search/v?id=NCI-2017-01937&r=1.). This study is a perfect example of bench to bedside initiative. In addition, they have made some major breakthrough in using miRNAs as therapeutic adjuvants for treating medulloblastoam and also breast cancers. Their ability to safely and effectively deliver microRNA using modified nanoparticle-based systemic delivery approaches have paved the way clinical development of candidate miRNAs in the near future. They are also actively engaged in understanding the role of RNA epigenetics, which has just begun to capture the imagination of scientific community, in cancer growth and progression. They were the first group to design novel algorithms that can identify transcriptome wide methylation as well as differential RNA methylation in normal and disease condition.   Recently, in a groundbreaking study, they showed that writers, erasers and readers of RNA methylation cross-talk with each other to maintain a level of RNA methylation that is critical for the stability of key progrowth/proliferation-specific genes and any pro-tumorigenic stimulus that perturbs that balance leads to uncontrolled expression/activity of those genes, resulting in tumor growth, angiogenesis, and progression. In addition to cancer, his group has made some seminal discoveries in the field of miRNA and development. They were the first group to develop an in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) approach that mimics the principle by which “microRNAs” are processed (Rao et al., Genes & Dev, 2006). Recently, in a groundbreaking work, they showed that LC3-associated phagocytosis is not only confined to macrophages but it is actively used by Sertoli cells to engulf and clear germ cell during germ cell differentiation and this process is regulated by microRNA. 

In addition to research, he is deeply involved in fulfilling the mission of Mays Cancer Center and serves as the Co-Leader of the Experimental and Developmental Therapeutics Program at the Mays Cancer Center.  He is also involved in the teaching and training mission at U.T. Health San Antonio and serves in a leadership role as a Discipline Director for the Cancer Biology (CB) track of the multidisciplinary graduate program at UTHSCSA. He also serves in a leadership role on the Committee on Graduate Studies (COGS) at UT Health San Antonio.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 14
"Immune oncology"

Sangeetha Reddy, MD
Assistant Professor
UT Southwestern Medical Center



Panelist
View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?

Meredith Regan, ScD
Associate Professor 
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute 

Dr. Regan is Associate Professor, Division of Biostatistics, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School. She received her doctorate in biostatistics from the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health. She is Director of the Statistical and Data Management Center for the International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) and Director of the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core for the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center Breast Cancer SPORE. She served on the NCI Breast Cancer Steering Committee and as co-director of the AACR/ASCO Methods in Clinical Cancer Research Workshop. She serves on the EBCTCG Steering Committee and St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference Scientific Committee.



Moderator
Educational Session
"DNA Damage Repair"

Andrea Richardson, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Pathology
Johns Hopkins Medicine

 Andrea Richardson MD, PhD is an anatomic pathologist with subspecialty training in breast pathology and cytopathology. She was a practicing physician and translational scientist at Brigham and Women's Hospital Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA for over 20 years. In 2015, she joined Johns Hopkins Medicine as Associate Professor and Director of Pathology for the JHM National Capital Region. She continues her translational breast cancer research with collaborators at Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center. Her research interests have focused on molecular pathology of breast cancer and development of predictive biomarkers of treatment response. 



Moderator
Educational Session
"Accelerating Recovery After Breast Cancer"

Moderator
Case Discussions

Mothaffar F. Rimawi, MD
Executive Medical Director of the Cancer Center
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Rimawi is a Professor, Medicine/Oncology, and Executive Medical Director of the Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center (DLDCCC) at Baylor College of Medicine. He received his medical degree from the University of Jordan School of Medicine and completed his training in Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, and Breast Oncology at Baylor College of Medicine.

His research is focused on designing and conducting biologically driven clinical trials to translate laboratory findings into new clinical treatments, and studying biomarkers of response and resistance. This will help elucidate mechanisms of therapeutic resistance to design more tailored treatment approaches, and to identify a treatment de-escalation strategy to spare patients unnecessary toxicity and cost when possible, without compromising outcomes.Dr. Rimawi has designed, led, and reported multiple biologically-driven national and international trials in breast cancer with special focus on translational work in HER2+ and in ER+ breast cancer. He serves on multiple national clinical research leadership committees including the Breast Committee of the NRG Oncology Group and is co-Chair of the HER2 Working group of the Translational Breast Cancer Symposium (TBCRC).



Panelist
View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?

Valencia Robinson
Board Member, Patient Advocate
National Breast Cancer Coalition

Valencia Robinson, Ed.S was diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer In October 2006. She was a high school English teacher and a mother of a 3, 4, 5, and a year old. She continued teaching during chemotherapy. Her experience ignited in her a passion to become an advocate for others, especially as she saw so many women suffering and dying after their diagnosis.   

Valencia quickly reached out to many groups and individuals to expand her advocacy work. She joined the Florida Breast Cancer Foundation and became a member of their Board. An active member, she serves on various committees and visits the state capitol in Tallahassee advocating for legislation that would make life easier for cancer patients and for funds to continue research and treatment for patients.   

Valencia expanded her advocacy to a national level. She graduated from NBCC ' s Project LEAD science training program in 2017. She quickly put her training to use, reviewing for the Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Breast Cancer Research Program, which challenges the scientific community to design research that will address the urgency of ending breast cancer. Valencia works with the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute, and as an NBCC representative with the Oncology Nursing Society, on projects to help improve care for women who are diagnosed with breast cancer. She sits on committees, such as the triple negative committee for a pharmaceutical firm, advising on clinical trial design from a patient perspective.   

As a national advocate, Valencia has participated in several NBCC Leadership Summits and Lobby Days, meeting with her Senators and Representatives to advance the group's public policy agenda. In her local community, for the past eight years, she has sponsored a free Wellness Retreat for breast cancer patients and survivors. She served a a panelist at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer  Symposium. In 2013 she was selected as a National Teacher of the Year by People Magazine. She is an author and speaker who uses her personal testimony to encourage others to change their outlook on the miracle of daily life. Valencia continues to embrace every opportunity to educate herself as an advocate and makes certain she disseminates what she learns to her community and beyond. 



Speaker
Debate
"For: All Breast Cancer Patients Should Have Germline Genetic Testing"

Mark Emerson Robson, MD
Chief, Breast Medicine Service
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Robson graduated from the University of Virginia School of Medicine in Charlottesville, Virginia, and did his internal medicine residency and hematology-oncology fellowship training at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington DC. He is currently Chief of the Breast Medicine Service in the Department of Medicine at Memorial Hospital in New York, an attending physician on Breast Medicine and Clinical Genetics Services, and a Member of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. His clinical research has concentrated on the optimal application of germline information to the management of cancer patients, particularly those with breast cancer. He has been a lead investigator for a number of trials of PARP inhibitors in patients with BRCA mutation – associated breast cancer. In addition to developing PARP inhibition as a therapeutic strategy, he is currently developing new models for the acquisition of germline information, including " mainstreaming" through test ordering by primary oncology providers and broad genomic screening in the context of somatic mutational profiling. He is currently investigating the use of polygenic risk scores in facilitating decision-making among women with or without an inherited predisposition. He serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Clinical Oncology and is an associate editor for the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, past chair of the Ethics Committee of that organization and has served several terms on the ASCO Cancer Prevention Committee and its Cancer Genetics subcommittee.



Moderator
Translational Science Forum
"Mechanisms of Response to Immune Checkpoint Therapies"

Jeffrey Rosen, PhD
CC Bell Distinguished Professor of Molecular & Cellular Biology
Baylor College of Medicine

Jeffrey Rosen studied chemistry at Williams College where he received a BA degree in 1966.  His Ph.D. research at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute helped elucidate the mechanisms for glucocorticoid resistance in lymphomas.  His postdoctoral studies at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine under the supervision of Dr. Bert W. O’Malley were concerned with the mechanism of action of estrogen in the chick oviduct.  His postdoctoral studies involved the isolation of ovalbumin mRNA and the first demonstration of steroid hormone induction of a specific mRNA.  

He joined the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine in 1973, and was a founder member of the first Department of Cell Biology in the USA.  In 1987-88 he spent a sabbatical leave in the laboratories of Drs. George Stark and Ian Kerr at the Imperial Cancer Research Laboratories funded by an American Cancer Society Scholar Grant, where he participated in early studies to elucidate the mechanisms of interferon action that helped lead to the discovery of the Jak/Stat pathway.  Dr. Rosen is currently a Distinguished Service Professor, the  Vice Chair and the C.C. Bell Professor of Molecular & Cellular Biology and Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine.  He was the recipient of two MERIT awards from the National Cancer Institute on a grant entitled, “Hormonal Regulation of Breast Cancer” currently in its forty-fourth year of consecutive funding.  His laboratory has authored 300 publications and book chapters. He is the PI on the CPRIT BCM Comprehensive Cancer Training Program.    Dr. Rosen has trained 37 graduate students and 45 postdoctoral fellows many of whom are now faculty at major academic institutions in the USA and abroad.  He has received the Marc Dresden Excellence in Graduate Education Award, the Barbara & Corbin J. Robertson, Jr. Presidential Award for Excellence in Education at BCM, the Endocrine Society Edwin B. Astwood Lecture Award, the Michael E. DeBakey, M.D., Excellence in Research Award, the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Brinker Basic Science Award, and the AACR Distinguished Lectureship in Breast Cancer Research.  He is also an AAAS Fellow.   

Dr. Rosen is the co-leader of Breast Program of the Dan L. Duncan NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center.  



Speaker
Educational Session
"Oncofertility"

Kathryn Ruddy, MD, MPH
Consultant
Mayo Clinic

Over the last decade, Dr. Ruddy has focused a substantial part of her research on the toxicities of cancer therapy, including reproductive toxicities. From July 2009 through June 2013, she worked as a breast medical oncologist at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and an Instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA.  There, she helped to lead a longitudinal cohort study of women diagnosed with breast cancer at or under age 40. Then, in 2013, she became Director of Cancer Survivorship for the Department of Oncology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, and now she co-leads the Symptom Control/Survivorship Cross-Disciplinary Group and the Population Sciences Program for Mayo Clinic Cancer Center across all Mayo Clinic sites. Dr. Ruddy serves on the Council of Advisors for the Young Survival Coalition, and is a member of the NCCN Survivorship Guidelines Committee, a vice chair of the Symptom Intervention Committee (as well as a member of the Health Outcomes and Cancer Care Delivery Research Committees) in the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology, and an Associate Editor at Journal of the National Cancer Institute (JNCI) and Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC) Cardio-Oncology. 



Chair
Spotlight Session 2
"Refining Targeted Therapy in Hormone Receptor Breast Cancer"

Hope S. Rugo, MD, FASCO
Professor of Medicine
University California San Francisco
Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

Hope S. Rugo, MD, FASCO, is a medical oncologist and hematologist specializing in breast cancer research and treatment. A Professor of Medicine, Dr. Rugo joined the Breast Care Center in 1999 after a decade of experience at University of California San Francisco (UCSF) in malignant hematology and bone marrow transplantation for a variety of diseases, including breast cancer. She entered the field of breast cancer in order to incorporate novel therapies based on an understanding of the biology of cancer with excellent quality of care into the treatment of women with breast cancer.

Dr. Rugo is the Director of Breast Oncology and Clinical Trials Education at the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. She is a principal investigator of multiple clinical trials focusing on combining novel targeted therapeutics with standard treatment to improve the treatment of both early and late stage breast cancer, and has published widely in this area. Her current research interests include immunotherapy and combinations of targeted agents in the treatment of breast cancer to overcome resistance. In addition, Dr. Rugo has conducted a number of studies focusing on reducing toxicity from therapy, resulting in approval of scalp cooling to reduce chemotherapy induced hair loss, and a steroid mouthwash to reduce targeted agent stomatitis. She is an investigator and the chair of the Safety Committee for the multicenter adaptively randomized phase II I-SPY2 trial, and also serves on the Novel Agents Committee. Dr. Rugo is the co-chair of the Triple Negative Working Group and an active member of the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC), and is the principal investigator of several TBCRC trials including a multi-center immunotherapy trial funded by the Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF). She is an active member of the Alliance (formerly CALGB) Breast Committee, as well as ASCO, where she serves on the Guidelines Committee and as an editor for the Education Committee.

In addition to her research, Dr. Rugo is an active clinician, and is committed to education, regularly lecturing locally, nationally, and internationally on subjects relating to the treatment of and supportive care for breast cancer. At UCSF, Dr. Rugo runs the Breast Forum, an open bimonthly evening educational session for breast cancer patients, families, and friends from throughout the bay area.

Dr. Rugo graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1983. She completed a residency in internal medicine and primary care followed by a fellowship in hematology and oncology at the University of California San Francisco. She was a post-doctoral fellow in immunology participating in laboratory research at Stanford University from 1988-1990. In 1990, Dr. Rugo joined the faculty at UCSF in the Division of Hematology and Oncology. Dr. Rugo has been recognized for her excellence in both patient care and in teaching of both medical students and training physicians. She has received several awards including the Bank of America Giannini Foundation Award and a UCSF Clinical Cancer Center Investigator Research Program intra-mural award. In 2006, she was honored for her work in Breast Cancer Research by the Friends of the Breast Care Center.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 12
"Chronic stress, sleep deprivation and health implications on breast cancer survivors"

Tara Sanft, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Yale University School of Medicine

Dr. Sanft is an Associate Professor of Medicine and the Director of the Adult Survivorship Program at Yale University, Yale Cancer Center. She treats women diagnosed with breast cancer and oversees a weekly survivorship clinic that provides comprehensive consultations to adult cancer survivors regarding medical care and lifestyle recommendations. In addition, she conducts a long-term breast cancer survivor clinic where she sees women who are > 5 years from diagnosis and no longer on active treatment. Dr. Sanft is now the Principal Investigator for an R01-funded study in which she is overseeing recruitment from their oncology clinics and working with the research team to conduct the intervention. Additionally, she is the site Principal Investigator of a study looking a resilience trajectory in patients diagnosed with breast, colon and prostate cancer, so that they may better learn who needs our help the most in order to thrive after cancer.  As a breast oncologist, she has a busy practice and is fortunate to serve on a CDC committee addressing breast cancer in young women.  Her research focuses on healthy lifestyles and quality of life after cancer. She recently became a facilitator for Relationship-Centered Communication Workshop that address how they develop therapeutic relationships with their patients and each other. 



Speaker
Special Session
"Breast cancer screening trials in low and middle income countries: Lessons learned"

Rengaswamy Sankaranarayanan, MD, MBBS
Senior Scientific Advisor
RTI International



Discussant
Spotlight Session 1
"Improving endocrine therapy"

Cristina Saura, MD, PhD
Head of the Breast Cancer Unit
Vall d'Hebron University Hospital

Dr. Cristina Saura is the Head of the Breast Cancer Unit of the Service of Medical Oncology of Vall d’Hebron University Hospital, and Principal Investigator of VHIO’s research group on Breast Cancer and Melanoma since September 2015. Dr. Saura graduated in Medicine from the University of Barcelona (UB) in 2002. From 2003 to 2007 she completed her internship in Medical Oncology at Vall d’Hebron Hospital in Barcelona.   In 2007, Dr. Saura obtained her Master in Advanced Studies and Research Aptitude. with the project “Breast Cancer Early Detection Program in High-Risk Women: pilot breast mammography and breast magnetic resonance imaging tracking experience”, with an outstanding grade “A”. Her interest in clinical research led her to complete the Program in Clinical Effectiveness at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston in 2007. She subsequently earned her PhD in Medicine from the Universtat Autonoma of Barcelona (UAB) in 2017 with honors cum laude with the project entitled "Treatment of breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy". She was awarded a grant of the Strategic Plan for Research and Innovation in Health (PERIS) from the Generalitat de Catalunya in 2018 with the project "Precision medicine in metastatic breast cancer: determination of mutations in tumors and circulating DNA as a guide for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer". Dr. Saura has participated as Principal Investigator and co-investigator in multiple clinical trials in the field of research on breast cancer driven by her interest in the development of new drugs that improve the prognosis of patients. She is currently involved in different international studies with drugs targeted against molecular targets in breast cancer. The work of dr. Saura is focused on precision medicine and she occupies a prominent position in the development of PI3K inhibitors and new anti-HER2 treatments. In the field of pregnancy-related breast cancer, she is currently leading a project on early diagnosis of breast cancer based on the presence of circulating DNA in breast milk. She is the author of multiple publications, as well as communications at different national and international congresses.   She is a member of the Scientific Committee and Board of Directors of the cooperative breast cancer group SOLTI, a member of the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM), and a member of GEICAM (Spanish Breast Cancer Research Group) and the European and American Oncology Societies (ESMO, ASCO).   



Discussant
Special Session 
"What is Resilience in a Crisis "

Lidia Schapira, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Stanford University School of Medicine



Moderator
Educational Session
"Tumor Inflammation (and Metastasis)"

Speaker
Educational Session

"HER2 targeted therapy: Determinates of response and mechanisms of resistance"

Rachel Schiff, PhD
Associate Professor 
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Schiff is an Associate Professor at the Baylor College of Medicine, Lester & Sue Smith Breast Center and the Departments of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology. She is an internationally recognized expert in breast cancer translational research with extensive experience in preclinical in vivo therapeutic and resistance models for various targeted therapies, as well as in correlative studies and associated biomarkers in clinical trials. Dr. Schiff received her PhD from the Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School in Jerusalem and completed her post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio. Dr. Schiff's research focuses on understanding the key signaling pathways in breast cancer and on identifying therapeutic strategies to overcome them, particularly treatments targeting the estrogen receptor and the HER2 receptor. Major research themes include the crosstalk between the ER signaling network and growth factor and cellular kinase pathways, the role of ER co-regulators and pioneer factors in breast cancer development and progression, the identification of genomic and epigenomic alterations underlying resistance to endocrine and HER2-targeted therapies, and the development of biomarkers for tailored therapeutic interventions. Dr. Schiff's research is partly supported by grants from the National Cancer Institute, The Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, and the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program. Dr. Schiff has co-authored over 100 peer-reviewed manuscripts and several book chapters in key textbooks in the breast cancer field.  



Discussant
Spotlight Session 9
"Metastatic"

Bryan P. Schneider, MD
Vera Bradley Professor of Oncology
Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center

My career is defined by a commitment to translational and clinical implementation of personalized medicine in cancer care. I am a Professor of Medicine at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center and serve as the Director of the IU Health Precision Genomics Program, which uses next generation sequencing to identify novel therapeutics for patients without standard therapeutic options. My time is devoted to caring for cancer patients as a Medical Oncologist and leading laboratory research work resulting in the identification of several biomarkers that predict which patients might suffer severe side effects from chemotherapy drugs before they ever receive the drug. I was named as an inaugural member of the prestigious Komen Scientific Advisory Council an have been the recipient the Komen Promise Award, which allowed my laboratory to evaluate the intersection of toxicity and efficacy by ancestry on over 9000 patients across 4 randomized trials. This work has shown that African American patients suffer more life-altering chemotherapy-induced toxicities and this leads to inferior quality of life and survival. Based on this, I have designed correlative trials in collaboration with multiple groups to better guide proper patient selection. This includes the design and recent completion of a post-neoadjuvant trial that compared a biomarker-driven personalized approach versus standard of care with the hope of improving outcomes. In addition, I am leading one of the first NCI-cooperative group trials through ECOG-ACRIN to focus on African American patients with the goal of identifying the optimal taxane in the curative setting (EAZ171). 



Co-Chair
Spotlight Session 6
"Novel Approaches to Pathology and Imaging"

Karla Sepulveda, MD
Director Breast Imaging
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Sepulveda graduated from the Mcgovern Medical School At The Univ of Texas Health Science Ctr At Houston in 1999. She works in Houston, TX and 2 other locations and specializes in Diagnostic Radiology and Radiology. Dr. Sepulveda is affiliated with Houston Methodist Hospital and Baylor St Luke's Medical Center.



Speaker
FDA  and Breast Cancer Workshop
"Tucatinib"

Mirat Shah, MD
Clinical Reviewer
Food and Drug Administration



Speaker
Plenary Lecture
"Advancing Cancer Research During Challenging Times"

Norman E. Sharpless, MD
Director
National Cancer Institute

Norman E. “Ned” Sharpless, M.D., was officially sworn in as the 15th director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) on October 17, 2017. Prior to his appointment, Dr. Sharpless served as the director of the University of North Carolina (UNC) Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, a position he held since January 2014.

Dr. Sharpless was a Morehead Scholar at UNC–Chapel Hill and received his undergraduate degree in mathematics. He went on to pursue his medical degree from the UNC School of Medicine, graduating with honors and distinction in 1993. He then completed his internal medicine residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital and a hematology/oncology fellowship at Dana-Farber/Partners Cancer Care, both of Harvard Medical School in Boston.  After 2 years on the faculty at Harvard Medical School, he joined the faculty of the UNC School of Medicine in the Departments of Medicine and Genetics in 2002. He became the Wellcome Professor of Cancer Research at UNC in 2012.

Dr. Sharpless is a member of the Association of American Physicians and the American Society for Clinical Investigation.  He has authored more than 160 original scientific papers, reviews, and book chapters, and is an inventor on 10 patents. He cofounded two clinical-stage biotechnology companies: G1 Therapeutics and Sapere Bio (formerly HealthSpan Diagnostics).  He served as Acting Commissioner for Food and Drugs at the US FDA for seven months in 2019, before returning to the NCI Directorship.



Co-Chair
Spotlight Session 6
"Novel Approaches to Pathology and Imaging"

Kalliopi P. Siziopikou, MD, PhD
Professor in Pathology
Northwestern University

Dr. Siziopikou is Professor of Pathology, the Director of Breast Pathology and the Director of the Breast Pathology Fellowship Program at Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine and the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center in Chicago, IL. Dr. Siziopikou received her MD degree from Aristotelian University School of Medicine in Thessaloniki Greece in 1985 and her PhD degree in Immunology from Rush University in Chicago, IL in 1990. She subsequently completed her residency in Anatomic Pathology at Beth Israel Hospital/Harvard Medical School and her fellowship in Breast Pathology at the Beth Israel Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute, in Boston, MA. Dr. Siziopikou is a diplomat of the American Board of Pathology and is fully licensed in Illinois and Massachusetts. Before joining Northwestern, Dr. Siziopikou was the Director of Breast Pathology at Loyola University Medical Center in  Chicago (1998-2003) and subsequently at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago (2003-2009).   

Dr. Siziopikou is active in a number of professional organizations including the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), Women in Cancer Research, the College of American Pathologists (CAP), the US and Canadian Academy of Pathology (USCAP), the Massachusetts Medical Society, the Chicago Pathology Society, the International Society of Breast Pathology and the Breast Committee and Working group of the NSABP/NRG Oncology national cooperative group. Dr. Siziopikou is the author of 60 original peer-reviewed articles and 105 peer-reviewed published abstracts. She has lectured extensively on Breast Pathology at numerous conferences nationally and  internationally.   

Dr. Siziopikou's subspecialty focus is on breast tumor markers and molecular diagnostics in breast cancer. Her research interests center around molecular markers of prognostic and predictive significance in breast cancer. Her current research focuses on the pathogenesis of triple negative and HER2 positive breast cancer, racial differences in the incidence of triple negative breast cancer, biologic differences in the behavior of breast cancer in young versus older breast cancer patients, pregnancy associated breast cancer, and mechanisms of development and tumor progression from preinvasive to invasive breast carcinoma.   

Dr. Siziopikou is a member of the NRG (NSABP) Breast Committee and Working Group and the pathologist co-investigator on the NSABP B43 study that is poised to change the paradigm of treatment for women with HER-2 positive DCIS lesions. She is also a member of College of American Pathologists (CAP) Multidisciplinary Breast Pathology AP3 Working Group, the Education Secretary and an Executive Committee member of the International Society of Breast Pathology and Section Editor for Breast Pathology at the Editorial Board of the Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. From 2015-  present Dr. Siziopikou serves as a San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium Abstract Selection Committee member. She  was also a member of the 2016 and 2017 SABCS Program Planning Committee and from 2017-present a San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) Program Planning Committee, Chairs Panel Member.



Chair
Spotlight Session 7
"Examining Early Events: Novel Models and Neoadjuvant Events"

Joyce Slingerland, MD
Professor
Georgetown University



Discussant
Spotlight Session 9
"(Neo) adjuvant"

Christos Sotiriou, MD, PhD
Head of the J.-C. Heuson Breast Cancer Translational Research Laboratory
Institut Jules Bordet, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB)

Christos Sotiriou, MD, PhD, Head of the J.-C. Heuson Breast Cancer Translational Research Laboratory, Institut Jules Bordet, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium; Head of Clinic at the Medical Oncology Department, Institut Jules Bordet; Research Director (tenured position) at the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research – FNRS (October 2017) 

Dr. Sotiriou leads a very successful research group that has contributed seminal and practice changing results in Breast Cancer translational research. With over 230 original research publications, he is among the most productive and influential scientists in this research area today. 

A widely recognized thought leader, Dr. Sotiriou serves as Chair or Co-Chair of symposia in highly visible international conferences including IMPAKT, ASCO and ESMO. He is a former elected member of the Scientific Council of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (World Health Organization) and an active member of numerous scientific committees. 

He is Elected Fellow of the European Academy of Cancer Sciences and Associate Editor for breast cancer of Annals of Oncology (ESMO’s official journal) since 2014. He has received many prestigious awards – including the 2015 “Joseph Maisin Scientific Prize - Clinical biomedical sciences”, a quinquennial prize awarded by the Belgian F.R.S.- FNRS.



Speaker
Mini-Symposium
"Aging"

Mike Stratton, FMedSci, FRS
Director 
Wellcome Sanger Institute 



Chair
Spotlight Session 9
"Challenging Indications and Innovative Approaches for Biomarkers "

W. Fraser Symmans, MB ChB
Professor of Pathology and Translational Molecular Pathology
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Fraser Symmans is Professor and Director of Research Operations in the Department of Pathology at MD Anderson Cancer Center, where he practices Breast Surgical Pathology and Cytopathology. He also leads a research program in Breast Cancer Pharmacogenomics within the Department of Translational Molecular Pathology. 

He received his medical degree from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, completed his residency at Columbia University, New York, and fellowship at MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston. Dr. Symmans joined the faculty of New York University Medical Center in 1993 and later moved to MD Anderson Cancer Center in 2000. 

Dr. Symmans’ research is focused on breast cancer, with specific emphasis on neoadjuvant (pre-operative) treatment trials for evaluation of chemosensitivity and endocrine sensitivity, assessment of response to treatment and development of diagnostic tests to select the most effective treatments for individuals with breast cancer. His other major research focus is addressing the effects of biopsy sample quality on genomic test results in order to establish appropriate best practices for clinical diagnostic use, particularly with small clinical biopsies. 

His additional responsibilities include: Director of Translational Research Program and Executive Committee Member for The Alliance for Clinical Trials and Alliance Foundation Trials, Steering Committee Member for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium, and member of the Cancer Correlative Sciences Committee for the National Clinical Trials Network of the National Cancer Institute. 



Discussant
Spotlight Session 3
"Oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors and ADCs in HER2+ breast cancer"

Tiffany Traina, MD
Medical Oncologist
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center



Speaker
Workshop
"Research technology for clinicians (CTCs, cfDNA, Crispr)"

Nicholas Turner, PhD, FRCP, BM, MA
Consultant Medical Oncologist
The Royal Marsden Hospital

Professor Nicholas Turner is a Consultant Medical Oncologist who specialises in the treatment of breast cancer. He read Natural Sciences at Cambridge University before qualifying in 1997 from the University of Oxford Medical School. After completing general medical training in London, he trained in medical oncology at Royal Free and University College Hospitals and completed a PhD at The Institute of Cancer Research in 2006. He joined the Breast Unit of The Royal Marsden as a Consultant in Medical Oncology in 2008.

He is a Team Leader in Molecular Oncology at the Breast Cancer Now Research Centre at the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR). He is Genotyping, Phenotyping and Cancer Evolution Theme Lead for The Royal Marsden and ICR NIHR Biomedical Research Centre.

Professor Turner is the Breast Domain Lead of the Genomics England Clinical Interpretation Partnerships, and has co-chaired of the ASCO/CAP review committee on circulating tumor DNA analysis in patients with cancer. He sits on the organising committees of many international conferences on breast cancer, was the executive chair of the IMPAKT 2015 breast cancer conference, and is a scientific editor of the journal Cancer Discovery. He is Chief Investigator of a number of national and international trials of precision therapy in breast cancer. His research interests include the development of new therapies for breast cancer and using liquid biopsies to deliver more precise treatment for breast cancer.



Speaker
Mini-Symposium
"BRCA/HRD"

Andrew Tutt, MB ChB, MRCP, FRCR, PhD
Head of Division of Breast Cancer Research
Institute of Cancer Research

Professor Andrew Tutt qualified in medicine in 1990. After postgraduate training in General Medicine, he trained in clinical oncology at the The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust before gaining a Doctoral Research Training Fellowship from the Medical Research Council to work in Professor Alan Ashworth’s laboratory at The Institute of Cancer Research, London. Here, he worked on the then-unknown DNA repair functions of the BRCA2 breast cancer predisposition gene and was awarded his PhD in 2002. 

In his postdoctoral work as a Clinician Scientist he identified the synthetic lethality between PARP inhibitors and BRCA1/2 mutations with Dr Chris Lord and Professor Alan Ashworth. He went on to design the Single Agent Proof of Concept Phase I trials and associated DNA repair biomarker studies with the ICR and The Royal Marsden Drug Development Unit, and has since led international Phase II and III trials for BRCA1/BRCA2-associated malignancy.  

He cares for women with breast cancer as a Consultant Oncologist in the multidisciplinary Breast Unit at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust. He is Professor of Breast Oncology and Director of the Breast Cancer Now Research Unit at King’s College London and has recently been appointed Director of the Breast Cancer Now Toby Robins Research Centre, Head of the Division of Breast Cancer Research and Professor of Breast Oncology at the ICR.  Professor Tutt has developed a translational laboratory for triple negative breast cancer. He leads a clinical trial programme focusing on TNBC and cancers associated with functional deficiencies in BRCA1 and BRCA2. He also leads translational laboratories at both the ICR and KCL, studying BRCA1 and BRCA2 associated TNBC forms of breast cancer. Andrew’s group publishes in high impact journals regularly and amongst their latest work they published a new TNBC target, PIM1 kinase, in Nature Medicine in November 2016. 

He is Chief Investigator for the recently reported multicentre UKCRN ”Triple Negative Trial” and is Global Study Chair of the ‘OlympiA’ study – an adjuvant PARP inhibitor trial in patients with germline BRCA 1/2 mutations and breast cancer.  He has been a Visiting Professor at British Columbia Cancer Agency, Jean Lubrano Visiting Scholar at Harvard Medical School, and is a member of the St Gallen Early Breast Cancer International Consensus Panel and recently received the Addarii Award for his work in the field of breast and ovarian cancer research. 



Moderator
View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?

Steven Vogl, MD
Physician
Scarsdale, NY

Dr. Vogl first suggested a critical review meeting at the end of SABCS just after the 2015 meeting and participated in the first two "View From The Trenches" meetings in 2016 and 2017. He is well known at SABCS for frequently asking key questions after presentations. 

He has been in solo private practice of general medical oncology for 38 years. Before that he was an academic oncologist who who designed and analyzed studies in lung, head and neck and gynecologic cancers in the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group where he served on several site-specific committees in the group.



Speaker
Basic Science Forum
"Factors impacting the tumor microenvironment: lessons learned from melanoma"

Jennifer Wargo, MD, MMSc
Professor
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Professor Jennifer Wargo’s career commitment is to advance the understanding and treatment of disease through science and has made groundbreaking discoveries in melanoma and other cancers that have been paradigm changing. After completing her medical degree, she entered surgical residency training at the Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts where she became interested in the biology and treatment of cancer. During her training, she completed two fellowships in Surgical Oncology with a focus on immunotherapy for cancer.  The Division of Surgical Oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital recruited Dr. Wargo in July 2008 where she headed an active research laboratory focusing on melanoma tumorigenesis and immunotherapy.

In September 2013, Dr. Wargo joined the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center to help lead the Melanoma Moon Shot program.  With a joint appointment in Surgical Oncology and Genomic Medicine, she continues her critical research to better understand responses to therapy and develop novel strategies to combat resistance.  This includes her groundbreaking recent work elucidating the role of the gut microbiome in shaping responses to immunotherapy in patients with melanoma and a clinical trial underway exploring optimal methods to manipulate the gut microbiome to enhance responses to cancer therapy. With the success of this research, Dr. Wargo has started a microbiome and translational research program at MD Anderson Cancer Center called PRIME TR. She is a recognized as one of the international leaders in cancer research, and leads innovative efforts globally. 



Discussant
Spotlight Session 6
"MRI applications and radiomics"

Susan P. Weinstein, MD
Associate Professor of Radiology
University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Weinstein graduated from the Univeristy of Pennsylvania Medical School.  Upon graduation from medical school, Dr. Weinstein stayed on at PENN for both her Radiology residency and Women's Imaging Fellowship. After completion of Radiology training, Dr. Weinstein, remained on as faculty in the Department of Radiology.  Currently, she serves on the medicine Department of Radiology Executive Committee and Breast Cancer Leadership Committee of the University of Pennsylvania Health System. She also is the of the Director of the University of Pennsylvania Health System Breast Imaging Network Optimization Team which oversees clinical policies involving  breast imaging  for all member hospitals of PENN Medicine.



Discussant
General Session1

Thomas "Trey" Westbrook, PhD
Professor
Baylor College of Medicine



Moderator
Educational Session
"Personalized HER2 Targeted Therapy 2020 - Are We There?"

Eric P. Winer, MD
Chief, Division of Women's Cancers
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Eric P. Winer is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Chief of Women’s Cancers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and is also Director of the Breast Oncology Program and the Thompson Chair in Breast Cancer Research.  He divides his time between clinical work, clinical research, and administration.  Since he joined the Harvard faculty in 1997, he has mentored over 20 fellows and junior faculty, the vast majority of whom have gone on to assume positions in major cancer academic cancer centers.  He has been the co-chair of the Breast Committee for the Cancer and Leukemia Group B and now the Alliance, but stepped down from that role in May, 2016.  Dr. Winer is the leader of the Dana-Farber/Harvard SPORE (Specialized Program in Research Excellence) in breast cancer. Finally, he has served as the Chief Scientific Advisor to Susan G. Komen for the Cure since 2007.  

Broadly defined, the focus of his research has been on improving the clinical care of women with breast cancer and has approached this task with a collaborative spirit, working closely with colleagues in basic science, translational medicine, biostatistics, health services research, clinical oncology, and psychosocial research.  He has conducted a wide array of Phase I, II, and III clinical trials in patients with breast cancer.  These trials have addressed all of the major biologic subtypes and all stages of the disease.  



Moderator
Educational Session
"Choosing Wisely" to Reduce the Toxicity and Burden of Radiation Therapy"

Wendy A. Woodward, MD, PhD
Professor
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Woodward is a Professor and the Section Chief of Clinical Breast Radiation in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC). She is a physician-scientist specializing in clinical breast radiation oncology with a lab focused on breast cancer stem cell biology and radiobiology  Dr. Woodward is the  Deputy Director of the MDACC Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic and Research Program and is dedicated to advancing the radiation treatment and biologic understanding of inflammatory breast cancer through laboratory, translational and clinical research. Nationally, she serves as the liaison between the breast working group and the translational research program in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group devoted to designing translational endpoints for multi-institutional trials in breast radiation therapy. Finally, Dr. Woodward has a strong interest in education and mentoring trainees in both clinical and translational breast cancer research and has received awards for both Post-doctoral and Resident mentoring.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Hypofractionated radiotherapy and emerging RT approaches"

Jean L. Wright, MD
Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology
Johns Hopkins University

Jean Wright is an associate professor of radiation oncology and molecular radiation sciences at Johns Hopkins University.  She completed medical school at Columbia University and radiation oncology residency at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, followed by an initial faculty appointment at the University of Miami.  Dr. Wright came to Johns Hopkins in 2014, where she now serves as Director of Breast Radiation Oncology and Vice Chair for Quality in the Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences.  She is an associate editor in the breast section of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology and Physics, a member of the American Board of Radiology Breast Committee, and a member of the breast cancer committee and vice chair of the Clinical Affairs and Quality Committee of the American Society of Radiation Oncology.  She represents ECOG-ACRIN in the Breast Oncology Local Disease (BOLD) Task Force of the BCSC.  Her research interests include novel strategies for treatment of early stage breast cancer, implementation strategies for tailored radiation decision making in low risk breast cancer, and toxicity related to breast radiation.   



Speaker
Educational Session
"EMT"

Jing Yang, PhD
Professor 
University of California, San Diego

Dr. Jing Yang is a Professor of Pharmacology and Pediatrics at the University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA. 

Their general research interest is to understand the molecular basis of tumor metastasis. They utilize cell and molecular biology tools, mouse tumor models, functional genomics, and 2D/3D imaging techniques to uncover the genes and the signaling pathways responsible for tumor metastasis. Specifically, they have identified two cellular programs, Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and invadopodia-mediated extracellular matrix degradation as being critical for tumor invasion and metastasis. They continue to dissect the signaling pathways regulating these programs and to test the importance of these signaling pathways in tumor metastasis in both mouse tumor models and human tumor samples.  



Moderator
Mini-Symposium
"Mechanisms of Mutagenesis in Breast Cancer"

Douglas Yee, MD
Director
Masonic Cancer Center 
University of Minnesota

Dr. Douglas Yee is director of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota. A professor in the Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, Dr. Yee holds the John H. Kersey Chair in Cancer Research. He is internationally known for his laboratory research on the growth regulation of tumors by the insulin-like growth factors and the clinical translation of these findings. Dr. Yee has a leadership role in the I-SPY 2 trial which is designed to validate investigational therapies in the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer. He is chair of the I-SPY 2 Agent Selection Committee and serves on its Executive and Data Access and Publication Committees. Further, he is the coordinating investigator for the BoehringerIngelheim phase 1b study of xentuzamab. Dr. Yee’s curriculum vitae includes well over 230 publications. He also maintains an active clinical practice in breast medical oncology at the Breast Center, University of Minnesota Medical Center.

Dr. Yee graduated from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, earned his medical degree from the University of Chicago,and completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill and completed his fellowship in medical oncology at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, MD. Before coming to the University of Minnesota, he held faculty positions in the Lombardi Cancer Center at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., and at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio.



Moderator
Educational Session
"New Frontiers in Immunotherapy"

Speaker
Educational Session
"New targets in myeloid cells"

Xiang Zhang, PhD
Professor 
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Xiang Zhang obtained his Ph.D. degree from Columbia University in 2006, and did his postdoctoral training at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from 2006 to 2011. He was then recruited to the Breast Center of Baylor College of Medicine as a McNair Scholar, and is now a tenured associate professor. His lab focuses on metastatic breast cancer, and has made seminal contributions in two areas: 1) bone metastasis and 2) tumor immunology and immunotherapies. In the former, he discovered the osteogenic niche that promotes early-stage bone colonization, and invented a series of pre-clinical models and technologies to accelerate anti-metastasis drug discovery . In the latter, he uncovered the link between oncogenic mTOR signaling and recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells  and a mutual regulatory loop between tumour vasculature and immunostimulatory reprogramming. These discoveries have made significant impacts in our understanding of tumor-microenvironment interactions and the consequent effects on therapies. 

Dr. Zhang is the first or corresponding author of 18 papers published in journals including Cell, Nature, Cancer Cell, Nature Cell Biology, Developmental Cell, Nature Communications, Genes and Development, PNAS, Genome Research and MCB. He also co-authored another 40 papers published in Cell, Nature, Cancer Cell, Nature Medicine and etc. He was the invited speakers of a number of international conferences including the Breast Cancer Think Tank (2012, 2014, 2016, 2017), Gordon Conference on Bone and Teeth Biology (2014), Gordon Conference on Mammary Gland Biology (2010 and 2019) and Advanced Breast Cancer First Consensus (2011). His awards include “Thesis with Distinction” by Columbia University (2006), the McNair Scholarship by Baylor College of Medicine (2011), Pathway to Independence Award by NCI (2010-2014), DoD BCRP Era of Hope Scholarship (2016), Excellent in Research Award of MCB, BCM (2016), Theresa Foundation Leadership Award (2016),  Susan G. Komen Career Catalyst Award (2014-2017), Michael DeBakey Award for Excellence in Research by Baylor College of Medicine (2018), and Sue Eccles Young Investigator Award of Metastasis Research Society (2018). He is a co-director of the annual Metastatic Breast Cancer Conference (2014-2019). He is the ad hoc reviewer of Science, Cell, Nature Medicine, Nature Cell Biology, Caner Cell, Cell Stem Cell, JEM, Cancer Research, RNA, Nucleic Acid Research, BMC Bioinformatics, Breast Cancer Cancer Research and Treatment and Breast Cancer Research, and is an active member of American Association of Cancer Research (since 2012), Metastasis Research Society (since 2015), and American Association of Immunology (since 2016).

In collaboration with  Astro     and     SSO