Faculty

Nicola Aceto, PhD
Professor of Medicine
University of Basel

Prof. Nicola Aceto is a Swiss National Science Foundation Assistant Professor of Oncology and the Group Leader of the Cancer Metastasis lab at the University of Basel, Switzerland. Recent discoveries of the Aceto lab include important insights into the biology and vulnerabilities of circulating tumor cell clusters (Gkountela et al., Cell, 2019, cover of the journal; Szczerba et al., Nature, 2019). Previously, Nicola worked as a postdoctoral fellow in the Haber lab at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center in Boston, MA, USA, where he identified circulating tumor cell clusters as metastatic precursors (see Aceto et al., Cell, 2014, Sarioglu and Aceto et al., Nature Methods 2015, Aceto et al., Trends in Cancer, 2015). He has also been an active member of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in Cambridge, MA, USA, and a visiting scientist in the Clevers lab at the Hubrecht institute, the Netherlands. Nicola received a PhD summa cum laude from the Friedrich Miescher Institute (FMI) in Basel, Switzerland with a thesis on protein tyrosine phosphatases and their role in breast cancer (see Aceto et al., Nature Medicine, 2012; Sun, Aceto et al., Cell, 2011). Nicola is an inventor on 10 patent applications related to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. 

Upon starting the Cancer Metastasis lab, Nicola has been awarded a Swiss National Science Foundation Professorship, an ERC-Starting Grant, an honorable mention from AAAS/Science Translational Medicine as well as grants from the Swiss Cancer League, the ETH Zurich Personalized Medicine Initiative, the Swiss National Science Foundation, the European Union through the F.E.T-Open scheme, the Basel Cancer League and the University of Basel. For his previous work, Nicola has been awarded postdoctoral fellowships from the Swiss National Science Foundation, EMBO, the American-Italian Cancer foundation, and the Human Frontiers Science Program. He also received an Ed Fischer Outstanding Thesis Award, a Bruno Speck Award from the Basel Stem Cell Network, and an abstract award from Harvard/MGH Cancer Center. 

Nicola has been an invited speaker in a number of congresses, academic and industrial organizations, including the ETH Zurich, the Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research in Lausanne, the Annual CTC and Liquid Biopsy Meeting in San Francisco, the European Society for Medical Oncology, the Swiss Re Forum on Cancer Diagnostics, the University of California Berkeley, Google[x] Life sciences, the Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research, the World Circulating Tumor Cells Summit and the Gordon Conference in Mammary Gland Biology.



Moderator
Educational Session
"Immunotherapy For Triple –Negative Breast Cancer"

Sylvia Adams, MD
Associate Professor
New York University
Perlmutter Cancer Center 

Dr. Adams' expertise is in breast cancer and cancer immunotherapy.


Moderator
Educational Session
"Acquired Endocrine Therapy Resistance Beyond ESR1 Mutations"

Moderator
Workshop
"Molecular Biology in Breast Oncology"

Carlos L. Arteaga, MD
Professor and Director
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center

Dr. Carlos L. Arteaga, obtained his MD degree at the University of Guayaquil in Ecuador. He trained in Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology at Emory University and the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, respectively. He joined Vanderbilt in 1989 where he served as Associate Director for Translational/Clinical Research, Director of the Center for Cancer Targeted Therapies and the Breast Cancer Program of the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC).

He has over 300 publications in the areas of signaling by growth factor receptors and oncogenes in breast tumor cells, development of targeted therapies and biomarkers of drug action and resistance, and investigator-initiated clinical trials in breast cancer. Since 2002, he directed the NCI-funded Vanderbilt Breast Cancer SPORE where he co-led several investigator-initiated clinical trials. His research is or has been funded by the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society, the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, Stand Up 2 Cancer (SU2C), the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation, and the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. He is member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation (1998) and the Association of American Physicians (2005). He served on the NCI Board of Scientific Counselors (1999-2004), NCI Parent Subcommittee A for review of Cancer Centers (2004-2008), the Breast Core Committee of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) and the Board of Directors of the American Association for Cancer Research (2004-2007). Dr. Arteaga is the recipient of the 2003 AACR Richard & Hinda Rosenthal Award, a 2007-2017 ACS Clinical Research Professor Award, the 2009 Gianni Bonadonna Award from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the 2011 Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction from the Komen Foundation, and the 2015 Prize for Scientific Excellence in Medicine from the American-Italian Cancer Foundation. He was elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2013 and Fellow of the AACR Academy in 2015, and serves in the Scientific Advisory Board of the Komen Foundation. He chaired the AACR Special Conference ‘Advances in Breast Cancer Research’ (2003-11) and has served as AACR co-chair of the annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium® since 2009. He was Deputy Editor of Clinical Cancer Research (2005-2013) and is member of the Editorial Board of Cancer Cell, Cancer Discovery and six other peer-reviewed journals. He serves in the advisory boards of several academic Breast Cancer Programs and NCI-designated Cancer Centers. He served as the 2014-2015 President of the American Association for Cancer Research, the largest cancer research organization in the world. In 2017, he was appointed as Director of the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center and Associate Dean of Oncology Programs at UT Southwestern Medical Center.


Banu Arun, MD
Professor
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Banu Arun is Professor in Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Co-Medical Director of the Clinical Cancer Genetics Program and Section Chief Breast Genetics, Prevention and Screening at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Her research focuses on identifying risk biomarkers for breast cancer and prevention, and characterizing risk factors in a cohort of high-risk women with hereditary gene mutations (BRCA and others) as well as assessing breast cancer biology in these patients. She has served as the Principal Investigator on several clinical trials evaluating agents such as letrozole, imatinib, gemcitabine, R115777 and PARP inhibitors for metastatic breast cancer (including BRCA positive,) and celecoxib, atorvastatin and dasatinib in short-term breast cancer prevention trials. She is currently PI for the 4-OH Tamoxifen gel NCI study.  

Given her national and international expertise she has served in several committees, including The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Prevention committee and currently serves as the Co-Chair for the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) Prevention and Epidemiology Committee and member of the NCCN Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Guideline Committee, member of the ASCO BOLD task force, member of ASCO IDEA committee, and member of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Prevention Steering Committee. She served as grant reviewer for Susan Komen and NCI P01 and reviewed for journal including JCO, Cancer, BMJ, Cancer Prevention and Epidemiology, amongst others. She has more than 200 peer reviewed publications and received research grants from the NCI, Susan Komen Foundation and CPRIT. (Multo-PI MIRA). 

She was also featured in Forbes (December 2017) as one of the top 30 breast medical oncologists in the Nation.


Judith Balmaña, MD, PhD
Head, High Cancer Risk Unit
Vall d'Hebron University Hospital

Judith Balmaña Gelpi, MD, PhD received her degree in Medicine and Surgery from the University of Barcelona and her Doctorate in  Medicine from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. In 2005 she was hired by Vall d´Hebron University Hospital and is currently the Head of the Hereditary Cancer Genetics Group.  

Dr Balmaña is author of many peer-reviewed articles and book chapter in her fields of expertise.


 

Speaker
Workshop
"Therapeutic development in the era of precision medicine: Paradigm shift from maximum tolerated dose (MTD) to optimal biological dose (OBD)"

Aditya Bardia, MD, MPH
Attending Physician
Massachusetts General Hospital
Harvard Medical School

Dr. Aditya Bardia, a board-certified medical oncologist, is an Attending Physician at Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston. As the Director of Precision Oncology Program at the MGH Center for Breast Cancer, Dr. Bardia is interested in integrating precision diagnostics and therapeutics, including clinical application of circulating tumor cells and DNA as “liquid biopsy”, to significantly improve the outcomes of patients afflicted with breast cancer. Dr. Bardia has led the clinical development of antibody drug conjugate (ADC), sacituzumab govitecan, and selective estrogen receptor degrader (SERD), elacestrant, in metastatic breast cancer. Dr. Bardia has received several research awards including outstanding award for research excellence at Mayo Clinic, Young Investigator Award from ASCO, and Douglas Family Foundation prize for excellence in oncology research at MGH. Dr. Bardia is the editor of precision medicine clinic section of The Oncologist, co-leader of the Molecular and Precision (MAP) tumor board at MGH, and editorial board member of ASCO molecular oncology tumor board.


 

Moderator
Educational Session
"Targeted Treatment Beyond PARP1 Inhibition"

Alexander Bishop, DPhil, BSc
Associate Professor 
Greehey Children's Cancer Research Institute
UT Health San Antonio

Dr. Bishop’s research focus is on DNA damage response and repair and how it relates to cancer using a variety of model systems, both in vivo with mouse model systems and in tissue culture systems. His research requires genetics, molecular biology, cell biology, and animal models. DNA damage response and repair are central to normal development and when aberrant development defects, aging phenotypes and cancer ensues. Dr. Bishop’s work reflects these various aspects of defective DNA damage response and DNA repair, with a particular interest in breast cancer, Ewing sarcoma, Bloom syndrome and Ataxia telangiectasia with several projects, grants and papers that are either directly or indirectly related to cancer research. In general, he has applied the knowledge he has gained to understand how these processes relate to cancer development and treatment. For example, they recently elucidated that in Ewing sarcoma that the chemosensitivity observed is due to protein interactions of the fusion oncogene EWSR1-FLI1 interfering with the normal biology of EWSR1, causing trapping of BRCA1 in a transcription complex and sequestering it away from promoting DNA repair. These findings are a paradigm shift in our understanding of the disease that has largely been studied with regard to the gene expression program instigated by EWSR1-FLI1 driving the etiology of this cancer. This work was published in Nature. They have also recently published a paper delineating how the NRF2 pathway response to alkylation damage to protect again unfolded protein response, again building on our systems biology approaches. Dr. Bishop has a particular interest in the ATM/p53/BRCA1 and NRF2 damage response pathways and how they relate to control of homologous recombination and cancers.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Cell fate and plasticity in the mammary gland"

Cédric Blanpain, MD, PhD
Professor
Université Libre de Bruxelles

Cédric Blanpain is MD/PhD and board certified in internal medicine from the Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium. He is full professor, WELBIO investigator and director of the laboratory of stem cells and cancer at the Université Libre de Bruxelles. His research group uses lineage-tracing approaches to study the role of SCs during development, homeostasis and cancer. His group uncovered the existence of stem cells and progenitors acting during homeostasis and repair of the epidermis and uncovered a novel paradigm of lineage segregation in the mammary gland and prostate. His lab was pioneered in using mouse genetics to identify the cancer cell of origin of epithelial cancers. They identified the cancer cell of origin and the mechanisms regulating the early steps of tumor initiation in skin basal cell carcinoma, skin squamous cell carcinoma and mammary tumors. His lab developed novel approaches to unravel the mode of tumour growth within their natural environment and to understand the mechanisms regulating cancer stem cell functions. 

Cedric Blanpain received several prestigious and highly competitive awards including EMBO Young investigator award, ERC starting and ERC consolidator grants, the outstanding young investigator award of the ISSCR 2012, the Liliane Bettencourt award for life sciences 2012, Joseph Maisin Award for basic biomedical Science 2015. He has been elected member of the EMBO in 2012, the Belgian Royal Academy of Medicine, and the Academia Europa.



Panelist
Educational Session
"Conversations on Tough Topics Surrounding Cancer Care"

Thelma Brown
Patient Advocate
Susan G. Komen

Thelma Brown is a two-time breast cancer survivor. Additionally, five sisters and her mother had breast cancer for more than 12 years.   

She has been active in various aspects in the breast cancer community including the Chair of the Education and Outreach Committee, Trainer, Advocate in Science and Board of Directors for Susan G. Komen, North Central Alabama Affiliate. She is the Lay Advocate for the University of Alabama at Birmingham Breast Cancer Working Group, Member of the Gulf States Young Survivor Coalition Advisory Board and Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalition. Ms Brown is also a Research Advocate for Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) and I-SPY 2 Trial.    

Additionally, she has participated in the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Survivor- Scientist Program twice.


Sarat Chandarlapaty, MD, PhD
Attending Physician
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

The goal of Dr. Chandarlapaty’s research is to investigate the mechanisms and consequences of activation of growth factor and hormone signaling pathways in transformation and the targeted therapy of breast cancer. He is a Laboratory Head in the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program at MSKCC and a clinical investigator on the Breast Medicine Service of the Department of Medicine. As a PI or co-Investigator on several federal (NIH, DOD) and philanthropically-supported (BCRF) grants, he has led investigations into understanding the basis for breast cancer pathogenesis and developing novel pharmacologic strategies to overcoming  drug resistance. A major focus of his work has been to identify mechanisms of resistance to therapies targeting estrogen and growth factor signaling. This has included studies identifying mechanisms of resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors.



Speaker

Basic Science Forum
"Genome regulation by long noncoding RNA's"

Howard Chang, MD, PhD
Professor
Stanford University School of Medicine

Howard Y. Chang MD, PhD is Director of the Center for Personal Dynamic Regulomes and Professor of Dermatology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Chang earned a PhD in Biology from MIT, MD from Harvard Medical School, and completed Dermatology residency and postdoctoral training at Stanford University. His research addresses how large sets of genes are turned on or off together, which is important in normal development, cancer, and aging. Dr. Chang discovered a new class of genes, termed long noncoding RNAs, can control gene activity throughout the genome, illuminating a new layer of biological regulation. He has invented new methods for defining the shapes of RNA and DNA genome-wide. The long-term goal of his research is to decipher the regulatory information in the genome to benefit human health. Dr. Chang's honors include the Judson Daland Prize of the American Philosophical Society, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Early Career Scientist, the Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise, Alfred Marchionini Research Prize, American Cancer Society Research Scholar Award, Damon Runyon Scholar Award, and elected membership to the American Society for Clinical Investigation. His work was honored by the journal Cell as a Landmark paper over the last 40 years and by Science as "Insight of the decade".



Speaker

Educational Session
"Neoadjuvant treatment: Tailoring response by subtype"

Co-Moderator
Mini-Symposium
"Future of Immuno-oncology in Breast Cancer"

Jenny C. Chang, MD
Director, Houston Methodist Cancer Center
Houston Methodist Hospital

Director of the Cancer Center at Houston Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas, and Professor at Weill Cornell Medical School. Dr. Chang obtained her medical degree at Cambridge University in England, and then completed fellowship training in medical oncology at the Royal Marsden Hospital/Institute for Cancer Research in the United Kingdom. She was also awarded a research doctorate from the University of London. Her recent work has focused on the intrinsic therapy resistance of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which has led to several publications and international presentations. In addition, Dr. Chang has been awarded several federal grants to evaluate novel biologic agents, and holds patents on new technologic advances and therapeutic agents. 

Dr. Chang has worked in the field of cancer stem cells for more than ten years. After her discovery that CSCs are chemo-resistant, and that targeting the EGFR/HER2 pathway can decrease this subpopulation, she has played a key role in demonstrating some of the limitations and mechanisms of CSCs (Creighton et al., 2009; Li et al., 2008). Her work is now focused on the mechanisms that regulate CSCs, as well as initiating and planning clinical trials that target this critical tumor initiating subpopulation. Dr. Chang is also interested in characterizing the cross-talk between these different pathways that may lead to mechanisms of resistance, and has identified some of the chief regulatory pathways, including inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) and JAK/STAT3 signaling involved in CSC self-renewal (Dave et al., 2014; Dave et al., 2017). She is a world-renown clinical investigator, credited as one of the first to describe intrinsic chemo-resistance of CSCs. She has served on the SABCS planning committee, and has been a speaker and moderator of a mini-symposium.



Moderator

Basic Science Forum
"RNA Rewiring in Breast Cancer Progression"

Chonghui Cheng, MD, PhD
Associate Professor
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Cheng has received several prestigious awards throughout her professional career, including the Julian R. Rachele Award of Excellence and the Frank Lappin Horsfall, Jr. Fellowship as a PhD student, the Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, the Career Development Awards from the Schweppe Foundation and from AACR, the ACS Research Scholar Grant, the Lynn Sage Scholar, and the Rising-Star CPRIT Scholar in Cancer Research from Texas. 

She has been a scientific reviewer for top-tier journals and for study sections in NCI, ACS, AACR and is currently a Medical Advisory Board member in the Lynn Sage Foundation. During her tenure at Northwestern University, she was Program Leader of the Tumor Invasion, Metastasis, and Angiogenesis Program at the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center (RHLCCC). Dr. Cheng organized several symposiums including the annual cancer center symposium at RHLCCC, was Faculty Search Committee member,  Chair of Travel Fellowship Review Board, and Course Director of the Tumor Cell Biology graduate course. Currently at Baylor College of Medicine since 2016, she serves as a co-organizer of the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center Annual Retreat, Graduate Education Program member in the Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Platform Judge of the Annual Department of Molecular & Cellular Biology Graduate Students Symposium, and a member in two Faculty Search Committees. Dr. Cheng also chaired an RNA and Disease Workshop in the 2015 international RNA Society Annual Meeting. 

Research interests are centered at understanding how RNA regulation affects breast cancer cell plasticity, resulting in tumor metastasis and therapeutic resistance. Her team is also pushing forward the research in circulating tumor cells (CTCs)and pioneering the RNA sequencing of CTCs. She has been invited to give seminars at major Universities in the US, including Columbia University, UCLA, UCSD, MD Anderson, Emory University, etc. and is also a regular presenter at national and international meetings, including the RNA Society Annual Meeting, the EMT International Association Meeting, and the Metastatic Breast Cancer Conference, etc.



Chairman

Debate
"Mastectomy should not be offered to patients who are breast conservation candidates when modern radiotherapy is available"

Richard L. Crownover, MD, PhD
Professor Clinical
UT Health San Antonio

Dr. Crownover obtained both his PhD in Physics and MD at Duke University in Durham North Carolina. He trained in Radiation Oncology at the University of California San Francisco. He joined the Cleveland Clinic in 1995 where he served as the Chief of the Breast and Musculoskeletal tumor services in Radiation Oncology, and also as the Director of the CyberKnife program when the CyberKnife was still under investigational device exemption. During a decade at the Cleveland Clinic he was a key player in the creation and successful growth of the multidisciplinary breast center. He was a member of the Cleveland Clinic’s system-wide Breast Cancer Quality Improvement Team. In 2005 he became the inaugural Director of the Reading Hospital and Medical Center’s newly opened Regional Cancer Center in Reading Pennsylvania. Dr. Crownover joined the Cancer Therapy and Research Center (CTRC) in 2007 where his clinical emphasis has been on treatment of breast cancer and development of a stereotactic body radiotherapy program. The CTRC subsequently became part of the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio is now known as the Mays Cancer Center at UT Health San Antonio. He is a Professor of Radiation Oncology and Director of the Radiation Oncology Residency Program. Dr. Crownover is Co-Leader of Breast Multi-Disciplinary Care Team.

Working with industry on the development of cutting edge radiotherapy treatment platforms has been a career-long interest. He is currently exploring the use of Surface Image Guidance for treatment for treatment of breast tumors and other disease sites including sarcomas and pediatric tumors. He is an active participant in local and multi-institutional breast clinical trials. He is and has been a member of the RTOG Breast Committee. Other areas of research have included early applications of high-dose-rate brachytherapy for sarcomas and stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung, liver, and spinal tumors.

Dr. Crownover has been named one of “The Best Doctors for Women” by Ladies Home Journal and one of “America’s Top Doctors” by Redbook. In 2017 he received the “President’s Clinical Excellence Award” at the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio.


Andrea De Censi, MD
Professor
Ente Ospedaliero Ospedali Galliera

Andrea De Censi has been Director of the Division of Medical Oncology, Galliera Hospital, Genoa, Italy since January 1, 2004, an Honorary Professor of Oncology at the Queen Mary University of London and scientific advisor of the Division of Cancer Prevention and Genetics at the E.I.O., Milan, Italy. His research interests are focused on cancer prevention and adjuvant treatment of breast, colon and ovarian cancer. He has served as principal investigator in over 30 phase II and phase III cancer prevention and treatment  clinical  trials involving over 15,000 participants, all of which are academic not for profit trials supported by National or International  Agencies, including the Italian Health Ministry, the Italian Association for Cancer Research, the Italian League against Cancer, the US-National Institute of Health/National Cancer Institute, the Susan Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, the Berlucchi Foundation and other non-profit Foundations or Charities. 

Prof. De Censi is an internationally recognized expert in cancer chemoprevention. Through his seminal work in breast cancer chemoprevention, he founded with Prof. Umberto Veronesi and Dr. Alberto Costa the first Clinical Unit of Cancer Chemoprevention in Italy at the European Institute of Oncology in 1995, since then mentoring many young clinicians and scientists to develop this growing branch of medical oncology. 

He is author of more than 220 publications in peer-reviewed Journals, mostly as first or senior author, with an H index of 45 and cumulative IF= 1928.512 and has served as member of several Committees for Cancer Prevention in the most important scientific associations, including ASCO, AACR, ESMO and AIOM. 



Moderator
Mini-Symposium
"Targeting the Cell Cycle Kinase CDK 4/6 and Beyond"

Angela DeMichele, MD, MSCE
Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology
Abramson Cancer Center
University of Pennsylvania

Dr. DeMichele is a Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania and holds the Jill and Alan Miller Endowed Professorship in Breast Cancer Excellence. Dr. DeMichele has been the Co-Leader of the Breast Cancer Research Program in the Abramson Cancer Center since 2005, where she also directs both the Breast Cancer Clinical Research Unit and the Breast Cancer TRACR Biobank.  She has a dual appointment as a Senior Scholar in the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, where she developed a graduate course on clinical trials and translational research and serves as thesis advisor to Masters and PhD candidates.

Her research program is focused on drug development, innovative clinical trial design and investigation of biomarkers for precision therapy.  As Co-Director of the 2-PREVENT Breast Cancer Translational Center of Excellence, she leads a multidisciplinary team to tackle the problem of breast cancer recurrence through novel clinical trials targeting disseminated and circulating tumor cells.  She has developed numerous targeted therapies, including phase I and II development of the CDK4/6 inhibitor, Palbociclib and is currently co-PI of the international PALLAS adjuvant trial and PATINA trial for Her2+ disease. In addition, she serves as Co-Chair of the Breast Committee of the ECOG/ACRIN Cooperative Group, Trial Operations Chair of the I-SPY2 multicenter, neoadjuvant trial, and Penn site PI for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium.  

She has authored over 150 publications in high impact journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine and Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), and her research is has been funded by the NIH, NCI, DOD, Komen Foundation, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Cancer Society and other philanthropic sources. She is an Associate Editor at Breast Cancer Research. 

She has chaired the Metastatic Breast Cancer Scientific Program and Breast Cancer and Clinical Trials Education Committees of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and serves on the ASCO Guidelines Advisory Committee in addition to serving on other ASCO committees, and on the American Board of Internal Medicine Oncology Subspecialty Board. 



Speaker

Educational Session
"Adjuvant endocrine therapy in 2020: It's complicated"

Angelo Di Leo, MD, PhD
Head "Sandro Pitigliani" Medical Oncology Department
Hospital of Prato

Angelo Di Leo is currently Head of the Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Unit and Chair of the Department of Oncology at the Hospital of Prato, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Italy, a position he took up in September 2003. After graduating in medicine and surgery at the University of Palermo, Italy in 1988, he received his postgraduate diploma in medical oncology from the University of Pavia, Italy in 1992, and in 1996 received his European certification in medical oncology. 

Dr Di Leo trained at the National Cancer Institute in Milan, Italy, where he worked for 7 years until 1996. From 1996 to 2003, he worked at the Chemotherapy Unit of the Jules Bordet Institute in Brussels, Belgium, where in 1997 he was appointed senior staff member and medical director of the Breast European Adjuvant Studies Team. 

Dr Di Leo’s main research interest is breast cancer, and he has coordinated a number of international, pivotal phase III trials in new adjuvant therapies. He is also heavily involved in the evaluation of molecular markers with potential predictive value for breast cancer. The author of many peer-reviewed articles, Dr Di Leo has lectured extensively at national and international meetings. He is a member of the Early Breast Cancer Trialists’ Cooperative Group steering committee, the Breast International Group Executive Board, and chair of the Biological Protocol Working Group (BPWG) - IBCSG. He has also served on the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) grants selection committee (2006–2009), the ASCO Education Committee (2012–2014), and the Scientific Advisory Council of the Susan G. Komen for the Cure® (2010-2016).



Moderator

Translational Science Forum
"Proteogenomics of Breast Cancer, From Discovery To Precision Medicine"

Speaker
Translational Science Forum
"Proteogenomics and clinical translation"

Matthew J. Ellis, MB, BChir, BSc., PhD, FRCP
Director
Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Matthew James Ellis a physician scientist who completed his training at the University of London (PhD) and the University of Cambridge (MB BChir). He is currently the Director for the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine where he coordinates an interdisciplinary team of oncologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, basic scientists and statisticians focused on improving our ability to prevent, detect and treat breast cancer. In addition, he is the Associate Director for Translational Research at the Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, with a broad role in promoting translational research. His research has focuses on estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. He has championed neoadjuvant endocrine therapy as a non-toxic alternative to chemotherapy for promoting breast-conserving therapy in postmenopausal women with ER+ HER2- stage 2 and 3 disease (Journal of Clinical Oncology 2001). He developed the Ki67 proliferation marker-based Preoperative Endocrine Prognostic Index (Journal of Clinical Oncology 2017) that is now undergoing a large validation study (the ALTERNATE study). These clinical studies have provided the context and tumor specimens for seminal investigations into the ER+ breast cancer somatic genome, with insights into clonal heterogeneity (Nature Communications 2015), new tumor suppressor gene discovery specific to ER+ disease and new therapeutic targets (Nature 2012). These include activating mutations in the HER2 gene that have been shown respond to HER2 kinase inhibition in clinical trials, particularly metastatic lobular carcinoma (Cancer Discovery 2013, Clinical Cancer Research 2017). He also is a pioneer of patient-derived xenograft research (PDX). A PDX study in triple negative breast cancer revealed clonal remodeling during brain metastasis (Nature 2010). PDX analysis also revealed acquired resistance to endocrine therapy is a consequence of ESR1 ligand-binding mutation; ESR1 amplification and most uniquely chromosomal translocation causing fusions between the N terminus of ESR1 and the C-terminus of genes that can confer constitutive transcriptional activity (Cell Reports 2013). To improve our ability to understand the complex genomic changes he has been working with the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium at the US National Cancer Institute to develop proteogenomic analysis of breast cancer. This mass spectrometry-based approach recently elucidated the functional consequences of somatic mutations, narrowed candidate nominations for driver genes within large deletions and amplified regions and identified therapeutic targets (Nature 2016, Nature Communications 2017). His work has been cited over 30,000 times (Google Scholar). Laboratory web page https://www.bcm.edu/research/labs/matthew-ellis



Moderator

Educational Session
"Discussing Risk in the Context of GEP Testing"

Speaker
Educational Session
"TBA"

Lesley Fallowfield, BSc, DPhil
Director 
Sussex Health Outcomes Research & Education in Cancer (SHORE-C)
Brighton & Sussex Medical School

Professor Dame Lesley Fallowfield has worked in Psycho-oncology for 35 years and has acquired a national and international reputation for her research, especially within breast cancer.

She is the Director of the Sussex Health Outcomes Research & Education in Cancer (SHORE-C) group at Brighton and Sussex Medical School. The team co-ordinates health related quality of life studies within big breast cancer treatment trials, developing and evaluating ameliorative interventions to help patients deal with treatment related side effects. The team also designs materials for evidence based communication skills training programs.

Dame Lesley has won many awards for this work including Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences, Fellowship of the Association of Cancer Physicians, the Umberto Veronesi Foundation Award for breast cancer research and in 2016 she was made a Dame Commander of the British Empire by the Queen for services to Psycho-oncology.

The educational session at SABCS will contain materials developed by SHORE-C via a BCRF grant to help clinicians when discussing risk of recurrence scores following genetic testing.



Speaker

Educational Session
"Adaptive resistance to hormonal therapy"

Suzanne A.W. Fuqua, PhD
Professor 
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Suzanne Fuqua received her Bachelor and Master of Science degrees from the University of Houston, and her PhD in Cancer Biology from the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas.  She joined the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio as a postdoctoral fellow in 1985, attaining the position of tenured Associate Professor in 1994.  She moved with this breast cancer research group to the Baylor College of Medicine in 1999, where she was promoted to the rank of tenured Professor of Medicine.  Dr. Fuqua holds a joint-appointment in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, is a faculty member of the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center and is Associate Director of Education and Training at the Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center.  Dr. Fuqua has published over 100 papers in peer-reviewed journals and has authored 50 Books/Chapters. She is internationally known for her research on the discovery of mutant estrogen receptors in metastatic breast cancer, and their clinical significance in breast cancer progression and resistance to hormonal therapies in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. 



Moderator

Educational Session
"Breast Cancer Prevention"

Judy E. Garber, MD, MPH
Chief, Division of Cancer Genetics and Prevention
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Garber is the Susan F. Smith Chair and Chief of the Division of Cancer Genetics and Prevention at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She conducts research in clinical cancer genetics, with a special focus in the genetics of breast cancer.  She has played a major role in the development of national guidelines in cancer genetics. Dr. Garber is also a leader in research into the characteristics and treatment of triple negative or basal-like breast cancer, the most common form in women with BRCA1 mutations and an expert in Li-Fraumeni Syndrome. Her translational research focuses on the evaluation of novel agents targeting DNA repair defects in breast cancer, including PARP inhibitors for treatment and prevention of breast cancer and other BRCA-associated cancers. 

Dr. Garber is a past president of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). She serves on the National Cancer Advisory Board of the National Cancer Institute and was elected into the National Academy of Medicine in 2013. She also serves as the Co-Scientific Director of the Breast Cancer Research Foundation and past chair of the Breast Cancer Research Foundation Scientific Advisory Board. She is an ASCO Statesman and a Fellow of the AACR Academy. 



Moderator
Educational Session
"Tailoring Adjuvant Therapies Based on Neoadjuvant Response"

Charles E. Geyer, Jr., MD
Associate Director of Clinical Research
Virginia Commonwealth University
Massey Cancer Center

The majority of Dr. Geyer’s research career has been focused on the design and conduct of multi-institution phase 3 clinical trials in early and metastatic breast cancer. He has been a continuous member of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) INRG Oncology Breast Committee since June of 1997 and the NSABP/NRG Breast Cancer Working Group since December of 1998. In 2002, he moved to the NSABP Operations office as Associate Director of Medical Affairs and 2 years later was promoted to Director of Medical Affairs. In 2008, Dr. Geyer was appointed as a founding Co-chair for the NCI CTEP Breast Cancer Steering Committee and received a Director's Award In 2011 at the completion of  his tenure.   

At SABCS 2018 he reported results of the landmark KATHERINE trial, which demonstrated adjuvant T-OM1 reduced risk of IDFS events by 50% relative to adjuvant trastuzumab in patients identified at higher risk for recurrence based on persistence of Invasive breast cancer following neoadjuvant chemotherapy combined with trastuzumab. Presently he serves as Study Co-Chair and member of the Executive Committee and Scientific Steering Committee of NSABP B-55 (OlympiA trial), a global collaboration between the Breast International Group and the NCTN led-byNRG Oncology, evaluating olaparib as adjuvant therapy for women with·germllne BRCA mutations and high risk breast cancer. Dr. Geyer also chaired the Steering Committee for the ABC trials Initiative, evaluating the continued role of anthracycllnes in the adjuvant therapy of high risk breast cancer. The effort, which Included NSABP 8-49 was a collaboration between NSABP, the US Oncology Research Group and the NCI. Finally he is serving as Study Chair for NRG BR004, evaluating the role of atezolizumab in the treatment of first-line metastatic HER2 positive breast cancer.


Michael Gillette, MD, PhD
Senior Research Fellow
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
Massachusetts General Hospital

Dr. Gillette is an Associate Physician at the Massachusetts General Hospital, an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School, and a Senior Group Leader and PI in Proteomics and Biomarker Discovery at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.  As a practicing pulmonary and critical care physician, Dr. Gillette has been motivated by the largely phenomenological diagnoses of many disease states, the general lack of “actionable” molecular taxonomies of disease, and the dearth of markers for early disease detection or therapeutic monitoring to develop expertise in the development and application of MS identity- and pattern-based biomarkers.  He leads the Broad Institute efforts in cancer proteomic biomarker discovery, having served as Broad Co-P.I. (with Dr. Steven Carr) on a multi-institutional breast cancer biomarker discovery and verification project jointly supported by the Entertainment Industry Foundation Women’s Cancer Research Fund and Komen for the Cure; heading the proteomic effort on a multi-institutional EDRN-sponsored ovarian cancer program (Steve Skates, MGH, program PI); and serving as co-PI (with Dr. Carr) in addition to other leadership roles in the NCI-sponsored Clinical Proteomics Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) program that has undertaken to integrate genomics with deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic annotations of a spectrum of cancers including breast cancer.  His biomarker development work extends beyond cancer to infectious diseases of high international health import, including Gates foundation-supported studies in tuberculosis and pediatric febrile illness.  With other Broad colleagues Dr. Gillette has been involved in the development and implementation of all aspects of a coherent biomarker discovery – to – verification pipeline including abundant protein depletion, chroma-tographic fractionation, unbiased discovery MS analysis, AIMS analysis for qualification of candidate biomarkers, and MRM- and SISCAPA-based candidate verification. He is on numerous scientific advisory boards including for the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Disease Systems Biology program and the National Biomarker Discovery Alliance, and is an Associate Editor for Molecular and Cellular Proteomics.  Dr. Gillette holds an MD and PhD (neurophysiology) from Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, and the MSc  (Human Biology) and MA (Psychology and Philosophy) degrees from Oxford University, Oxford, UK.  He brings a blend of deep clinical knowledge and current practice, experimental design expertise, mass spectrometry and diverse laboratory skills, and over 15 years' direct experience to his leadership roles in proteomics and biomarker development.


Sharon H. Giordano, MD, MPH, FASCO
Department Chair
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Giordano is the Chair of the Department of Health Services Research and a Professor of Medicine in the Department of Breast Medical Oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC). Her research interests include quality of health care delivery, disparities, and outcomes for cancer patients. She is currently funded through NCI, CPRIT, the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, AHRQ, and Susan G. Komen. Dr. Giordano is the Pl of the Outreach Core on the U54 Grant with MD Anderson and the University of Puerto Rico: Partnership for Excellence in Cancer Research, and serves as the co-leader of the Risk, Detection, and Outcomes Program for the MD Anderson Cancer Center Support Grant. She has over 200 publications and a track record of continuous Pl funding since 2004. She serves on national committees including as the co-Chair of ASCO's Breast Cancer Guideline Advisory Group and as a member of the NCCN Breast Cancer Guideline Panel. Dr. Giordano is on the editorial boards for the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Cancer, and the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.



Moderator

Educational Session
"Multidisciplinary Approach to Optimizing Local Regional Therapy in Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer"

Armando E. Giuliano, MD
Chief of Surgical Oncology
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Dr. Giuliano has been a clinician-researcher his entire career and currently is the Executive Vice Chair of Surgery, Chief of Surgical Oncology, Professor of Surgery, and the Linda and Jim Lippman Chair in Surgical Oncology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. He has served as chairman of the Breast Organ Site Committee of the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group Breast Research Committee and was author and principal investigator for the sentinel node 20010 and 20011 studies which significantly changed the standard of care for patients with early breast cancer. The main focus of his clinical research continues to be management of early breast cancer and quality of life of breast cancer patients. 

Armando E. Giuliano is President of the Society of Surgical Oncology. Currently he serves on the American College of Surgeons Board of Governors and as Chair of the Nominating Committee. Additionally, he is very active in teaching fellows and residents and has served as chairman of the Breast Fellowship Program Directors Committee for the Society of Surgical Oncology. He has been the recipient of numerous teaching awards and honors in the field including the Veronesi Award, Castle Connolly's national Clinical Excellence Award, the Glenn-Robbins Award, the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction in Clinical Research, the Onclive Giant of Cancer Care® Award in Surgical Oncology and is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh ad hominem (FRCSEd). 

Dr. Giuliano is a frequent speaker at national and international conferences and has been a visiting professor in the U.S., Europe and Asia. Further, he is the author of more than 500 scientific articles and book chapters and has edited a textbook.



Speaker

Workshop
"Novel target discovery by longitudinal deep spatial & molecular analysis of breast cancers"

Joe Gray, PhD
Professor
Oregon Health & Science University


Rachel A. Greenup, MD, MPH
Associate Professor of Surgery and Population Health Sciences
Duke Cancer Institute

Dr. Greenup will present on the financial hardship of breast cancer care in the "Tough Topics Surrounding Breast Cancer Care" Educational Session. In 2004, Dr. Greenup completed medical school at the Medical College of Wisconsin, and  General Surgery residency from 2004-2011. Mid-residency, she completed a Masters in Public Health at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. From 2011-2012, she completed a Breast Surgical Oncology Fellowship at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She is currently an Associate Professor of Surgery and Population Health Sciences at Duke School of Medicine and the Duke Cancer Institute. Dr. Greenup is currently funded by the National Institutes of Health Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health (BIRCWH) Award.  Her research includes institutional and national collaborations in the arena of improving breast cancer care delivery by aligning patient-centered treatment with high value oncology care.  



Speaker
Workshop
"Defining a cancer dependency map"

William C. Hahn, MD, PhD
Chief, Research Strategy Officer
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Hahn's work as a physician-scientist involves both the care of cancer patients and biomedical research directed toward a greater understanding of the mechanisms involved in malignant transformation. His laboratory focuses on understanding the cooperative interactions that conspire to transform human cells. To address this question, they have developed new experimental models of human cancer of defined genetic composition, created methods to perform systematic interrogation of gene function in mammalian cells and tissues and help optimize new approaches to integrate genome scale data. Using these approaches, they have identified and credential new oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and have performed preclinical studies that will form the foundation necessary for translational studies in patients.  

Specifically, they have developed genetic methods that permit the construction of genetically defined, experimental models of the major human epithelial cancers from primary human cells through the manipulation of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and telomerase. These model systems have permitted them to study the molecular interactions that lead to cancer. In addition, they have performed proof-of-principle experiments that such experimental models will prove useful in the discovery and validation of molecularly targeted therapies. Indeed, these experimental models have allowed them to investigate the mechanisms by which EGFR and other oncogenes and tumor suppressors contribute to cancer initiation. In particular, they have elucidated the role of the PP2A family of serine-threonine phosphatases as tumor suppressor genes. 

As a Senior Associate Member of the Broad Institute, he leads efforts to apply functional genomic approaches to cancer. Specifically, Dr. Hahn serves as one of the co-principal investigators for the RNAi Consortium (TRC), which has created a genome scale RNA interference library, and have established RNAi screening facilities at both the Broad Institute and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI). In his own laboratory, they are engaged in using these RNAi libraries to apply a comprehensive program to identify cancer vulnerabilities. Using these approaches, they have already discovered several new oncogenes including IKBKE, CDK8, CRKL, CDK6, and PAK1. 

He also co-directs the Center for Cancer Genome Discovery, which is committed to the development and implementation of technologies that permit the interrogation of cancer-associated mutations at genome scale and to implement these technologies prospectively in newly diagnosed patients.



Panelist
Special Session
"View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?"

Nadia Harbeck, MD, PhD
Head of the Breast Center
University of Munich

Nadia Harbeck, MD, PhD, is head of the Breast Center and holds the chair for Conservative Oncology at the Dept. of OB&GYN, University of Munich (LMU), Germany. She obtained her specialist degree (OB&GYN) at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and her medical degree from the University of Munich. From 2005-2009, she was an assistant professor and head of Conservative Senology at TUM and from 2009-2011, she was head of the Breast Center at the University of Cologne, Germany.

Professor Harbeck is a member of the expert panel issuing the yearly updated evidence-based AGO Guidelines for breast cancer therapy in Germany (www.ago-online.de). She is scientific director of the West German Study Group (www.wsg-online.com). From 2009-2015, she served on the executive board of the EORTC as the chair of the translational research division. Professor Harbeck is principal investigator or steering committee member of numerous national and international clinical breast cancer trials, particularly with novel targeted compounds. Her translational research focuses on prognostic and predictive factors in breast cancer and other solid tumours. She has a strong interest in eHealth and is a co-developer of CANKADO, an international digital patient diary (www.cankado.com).

Professor Harbeck has authored more than 470 papers in peer-reviewed journals (cumulative impact factor > 2775; h-index 71) and is coordinating editor-in-chief of Breast Care (Karger Publishers). For her clinical translational research, she has received numerous awards, including the 2015 Bavarian Cancer Patient Award, the 2012 Claudia von Schilling Award, the 2008 EBCC Award (Emmanuel van der Schueren Lecture), the 2002 AGO Schmidt-Matthiesen Award, a 2001 AACR Award, and the 2001 ASCO Fellowship Merit Award for the highest ranking abstract submitted. She is a panel member of several international breast cancer consensus conferences, such as for advanced breast cancer (ABC), breast cancer in young women (BCY), and early breast cancer (St Gallen).



Speaker
Basic Science Forum
"RNA methylation in cancer progression"

Chuan He, PhD
Professor 
The University of Chicago
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Dr. He is the John T. Wilson Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Chicago. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1994 from the University of Science and Technology of China and his Ph.D. in chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2000, studying under professor Stephen J. Lippard. After training as a Damon-Runyon postdoctoral fellow with professor Gregory L. Verdine at Harvard University, he joined the University of Chicago as an assistant professor, rising to associate professor in 2008 and full professor in 2010. He was selected as an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in 2013. Dr. He’s research spans a broad range of fields including chemical biology, epigenetics, biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, and genomics. His recent research concerns reversible RNA and DNA methylation in biological regulation. His laboratory discovered reversible RNA methylation as a new mechanism of gene expression regulation in 2011. 

He is a recipient of the 2017 Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Novel DNA repair targets for breast cancer"

Thomas Helleday, PhD
Professor of Translational Oncology
University of Sheffield

Since July 2018, Thomas Helleday has worked as Professor of Translational Oncology, and founding Director of the Weston Park Cancer Centre, hosted within the Department of Oncology & Metabolism at the University of Sheffield.   

Prior to this he was the Soderberg Professor of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology at Karolinska lnstitutet, Stockholm, Sweden heading the division of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology located at Science for Life laboratories. Thomas Helleday started his own independent research groups at the Institute for Cancer Studies, University of Sheffield, UK in 2000, only a year after completing a PhD in Genetic Toxicology and a separate BSc in Business Administration and Economics. At the age of 35 years old he was already installed as professor at three Universities; Stockholm University, University of Sheffield and at the University of Oxford.   

Professor Helleday heads a multidisciplinary translational research group focusing on understanding basic DNA repair and DNA-damage signalling pathways at replication forks and developing novel drugs for anti-cancer treatments. The group was first to demonstrate a novel concept for treating cancer called " synthetic lethality " established by the selective killing of BRCA mutated breast and ovarian cancers by PARP inhibitors. The research group is currently divided into teams focusing on basic science, biology, biochemistry, medicinal chemistry, in vivo pharmacology and clinical development. The work is focussed on bench to bedside with the group motto being ' turning cancer defects into cures’. Compounds generated in the Helleday laboratory are currently tested in clinical trials. We are working tremendously hard to ensure that innovative and transformative treatments get quickly and effectively from our research laboratories into the clinic to ensure maximum patient benefit.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Everything comes with a price (toxicity)"

Dawn Hershman, MD
Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology
Columbia University Medical Center
New York Presbyterian Hospital

Dr. Hershman is a Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology with Tenure and is Director of the Breast Cancer Program of the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center. She has developed nationally recognized expertise in breast cancer treatment, prevention, survivorship, late-effects of cancer therapy, health outcomes and health disparities research. She was awarded career development awards from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the National Cancer Institute (K07). She has subsequently received research funding from the American Cancer Society, ASCO, Department of Defense, Susan Komen Foundation, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, AVON Foundation and the NCI. In addition, she was selected to be a Komen Scholar. She has mentored numerous faculty members who have been granted mentored career development awards. She has a strong publication record with over 300 papers and including many in high profile journals, with many receiving national press coverage.

She has several national leadership roles in oncology. She is the Vice-Chair of the SWOG NCORP research base and Co-Chair of the Cancer Care Delivery Committee. Within ASCO she was selected to participate in the first Leadership Development Program and has been the Chair of the Grants Selection Committee, the leader of the education tack for Health Services, she has been on the quality of care committee and the publications committee. She is Co-Chair of the CancerLinq Research and Publications Committee and serves on the breast cancer and the cancer care delivery steering committees of NCI. She is on the editorial board for the Journal of Clinical Oncology and is an Associate Editor at the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Dr. Hershman has received several awards including the highly prestigious Advanced Clinical Clinical Research Award in Breast Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the Advanced Medical Achievement Award from the Avon Foundation, she is a Komen Scholar and was recently awarded the Conquer Cancer Foundation Research Professorship in Breast Cancer Comparative Effectiveness Research.



Co-Moderator
Mini-Symposium
"Future of Immuno-oncology in Breast Cancer" 

Helen Heslop, MB ChB, MD, DSc
Director, Center for Cell and Gene Therapy
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Helen Heslop is a physician scientist engaged in translational research focusing on adoptive immunotherapy with gene-modified effector cells, to improve hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and cancer therapy. Her initial studies were the first to demonstrate that antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells could eradicate an established malignancy. Because the cells were genetically marked, they obtained definitive evidence of cell expansion, trafficking to tumor sites and decade-long persistence. Subsequent protocols have extended this approach to Hodgkin Lymphoma, NHL and nasopharyngeal cancer. She has an additional focus in reconstituting antiviral immunity post transplant and led an NHLBI-funded multicenter trial of allogeneic multivirus specific T cells. She therefore has extensive experience in developing and conducting transplant studies and cell and gene therapy studies and currently holds over 20 INDs. Dr. Heslop has also obtained orphan drug designation for her initial study. 

She serves as Principal Investigator on several peer-reviewed research programs, including an NCI-funded program project grant (Enhancing T-Cell Therapy of Cancer, CA 94237), and a Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Specialized Center of Research (SCOR) award (Immunotherapy of Hematologic Malignancies). She directs a SPORE in lymphoma and is the principal investigator on an NHLBI-funded training grant in Cell and Gene Therapy. 

Dr. Heslop has served on a number of national committees so has extensive administrative experience. Pertinent to her role in this application is her experience in managing large multi-investigator programmatic grants, her expertise in immunotherapy and in IND cell and gene therapy studies and her mentoring track record.



Speaker
Year in Review
"Metastatic breast cancer"

Sara Hurvitz, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
University of California Los Angeles 

Sara A Hurvitz, MD, is Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA); co-director of the Santa Monica-UCLA Outpatient Oncology Practice; Medical Director of the Clinical Research Unit of the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA; and Director of Breast Oncology. Dr. Hurvitz earned her MD from the University of Southern California. She served internship/residency at UCLA, was Chief Resident of internal medicine and completed a hematology-oncology fellowship at UCLA in 2006. Dr. Hurvitz received board-certification in internal medicine, hematology, and medical oncology.  She is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Association of Cancer Research and is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians. 

Dr. Hurvitz has won numerous awards over the past few years, among them the Marni Levine Memorial Breast Cancer Research Award 2008 through 2015. She has an active clinical practice specializing in the treatment of women with breast cancer. She is involved in designing, implementing and leading multiple national and international clinical trials testing new targeted therapies and also leads the preclinical evaluation of novel breast cancer targets in the Translation Oncology Research Laboratory at UCLA.



Panelist
Special Session
"View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?"

E. Shelley Hwang, MD, MPH
Professor and Vice Chair of Research
Duke University

Throughout Dr. Hwang's career, one fundamental principle has guided her approach to patient care. For each patient, she strives to provide the kind of care that she would want for her own family and bring her best expertise, judgment and empathy to guide patients to restore and maintain long-term health. She knows that the work that she does isn’t just for the patients who she directly cares for, but it affects the whole family. Being a mother and a wife helps bring that perspective to the work she does. She never loses sight of how important it is to treat the whole family and to recognize the effects of disease on it. Dr. Hwang believes that Duke offers patients the best and most advanced care that they can get anywhere in the world. She has been touched by cancer in her life. Just being on the receiving end of healthcare makes you very sensitive about the things required for the patient to feel like they are getting the best possible care.



Moderator

Educational Session
"Evolving Opportunities to Personalize Radiation Decisions"

Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil
Professor and Deputy Chair
University of Michigan 

Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil, is Professor and Deputy Chair in the Department of Radiation Oncology and Director of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine at the University of Michigan. She graduated first in her class from Harvard College and then pursued her medical training at Harvard Medical School. She also served as a fellow in the Center for Ethics at Harvard University and completed her doctorate in Social Policy at Oxford University as a Marshall Scholar. Dr. Jagsi’s medical research focuses on improving the quality of care received by breast cancer patients, both by advancing the ways in which breast cancer is treated with radiation and by advancing the understanding of patient decision-making, cost, and access to appropriate care. Her social scientific research includes research into issues of bioethics arising from cancer care and research regarding gender issues, including studies of women's representation in the medical profession. She is the author of over 200 articles in peer-reviewed journals, and her research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the American Cancer Society, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and other philanthropic foundations. She serves as the radiation oncology liaison for the Breast Committee of SWOG and as a representative on the National Cancer Institute’s BOLD task force, and she is also active in NRG and the TBCRC. She has been elected to the Board of Directors of ASCO and serves on numerous other influential national professional committees.



Speaker

Educational Session
"TBA"

Valerie Ann Jenkins, DPhil, BSc
Professor
Sussex Health Outcomes Research & Education in Cancer (SHORE-C)
Brighton & Sussex Medical School 

Prof. Valerie Ann Jenkins role in this medical education activity is a co-presenter of elements from an educational program called TARGET - Talking About Risk in the context of GEnomic Test results.

She co-produced the program with Professor Dame Lesley Fallowfield and will present results from the evaluation of the program and a spin off for specialist breast cancer nurses. It is one of a series of research based communication packages. These include Talking About Randomized Clinical Trials of Cancer, Talking About Early Phase Cancer Trials, Discussing Metastatic Bone Disease and several others including patient information films.

Prof. Jenkins has conducted Psychosocial oncology research for over 23 years in the following areas:

  • Highlighting the psychosocial effects of cancer and its treatment on patients, including cognitive effects of breast cancer treatments
  • Transforming the education and communication skills of health care professionals (HCPs).


Speaker

Mini-Symposium
"Targeting the cell cycle - Beyond CDK4/6 inhibition"

Rinath Jeselsohn, MD
Instructor in Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Rinath Jeselsohn is a physician scientist and Medical Oncologist at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Her research focuses on mechanisms of endocrine resistance in breast cancer. In particular, she studies genomic and epigenetic alterations in acquired hormone resistance, employing pre-clinical models as well as human tissue specimens. Her work, as well as other groups has led to the identification of ESR1 mutations that render constitutive activity and endocrine resistance. More recently she has shown that the ESR1 mutations have allele specific neomorphic functions and are drivers of metastases.

Dr. Jeselsohn spends one day a week caring for breast cancer patients at the Breast Oncology Center at DFCI. More recently, she joined the Early Drug Development Center (EDDC) at DFCI as the breast cancer representative and is responsible for managing the breast cancer patients enrolled in the EDDC Phase I studies. In summary, she is a physician-scientist active in translational research studying mechanisms of endocrine resistance and strategies to improve treatment for hormone receptor positive breast cancers. Dr. Jeselsohn is also engaged in the care of breast cancer patients and innovative clinical trials with the goal to identify new treatments to improve outcomes in breast cancer patients.


Maxine Jochelson, MD
Director of Radiology Breast and Imaging Center
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Maxine Jochelson has been a board-certified diagnostic radiologist since 1981. She did a medical internship at LA county USC where she also did her radiology residency and completed an NIH sponsored Oncologic Radiology fellowship at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute/ Harvard Medical School from 1981 to 1983 after which she stayed on and became the director of radiology at the Farber from 1984 through 1991. 

She went into private practice until 2009 when she returned to academics at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and became a Member (Full Professor) of Radiology. Dr. Jochelson is primarily a breast imager but read and do research in PET/CT as well. Her primary areas of research interest in breast are in the development of new technologies and in particular Contrast Enhanced Digital Mammography (CEDM) and in particular its use in screening women at increased risk for breast cancer. Another major interest is in the ideal imaging approach for women at various levels of increased risk. These latter 2 interests relate closely to her educational session at this meeting.    

Dr. Jochelson recently presented a talk on this topic at the Lynn Sage Meeting in Chicago, New York Roentgen Ray meeting, NYU Head to Toe Meeting and the Radiologic Society of North America annual meeting.



Moderator

Workshop
"Developing Novel Therapeutics in the Metastatic Setting"

Moderator
Educational Session
"Implementation of Genetic Testing in Breast Cancer Patients"

Virginia G. Kaklamani, MD
Professor
UT Heath San Antonio

Dr. Kaklamani is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology/Oncology at the UT Health San Antonio and is the Leader of the Breast Cancer Program at the Mays Cancer Center. Dr. Kaklamani completed her medical training with honors at the University of Athens and her residency in Internal Medicine at Newton-Wellesley Hospital in Boston, MA. She completed her fellowship in hematology/oncology at Northwestern University. She also received a Master of Science in Clinical Investigation from Northwestern University.

She was Head of the Translational Breast Cancer Program at Northwestern University and co-director of the cancer genetics program at the same institution. Her research interests include studying high risk families and identifying genetic mutations that are associated with an increased risk for breast, colon and prostate cancer. She has identified several genetic mutations related to obesity which increase the risk of breast cancer. Dr Kaklamani is a clinical investigator with expertise in designing clinical trials with targeted agents.



Speaker

Educational Session
"Risk-based recommendations: considering the time-frame"

Seema A. Khan, MD
Professor of Surgery
Northwestern University 

Dr. Seema Ahsan Khan is Professor of Surgery at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University and is trained in Surgical Oncology. Her clinical practice at the Lynn Sage Comprehensive Breast Center includes the surgical therapy of women with breast cancer, and the evaluation and management of women at high risk for breast cancer. She also has an active research program in breast cancer risk assessment and prevention and is PI of the Northwestern Cancer Prevention Consortium. This is funded by the Division of Cancer Prevention of the NCI and conducts early-phase trials in cancer prevention at all organ sites. 

Dr. Khan’s current research is focused on the development of novel agents for breast cancer prevention, and on transdermal drug delivery to the breast skin so as to avoid or reduce the systemic effects associated with oral drug administration. She has also conducted studies on breast cancer risk biomarkers in breast tissue, and on minimally invasive techniques of obtaining breast samples for biomarker research. 


Tari Ann King, MD
Chief Breast Surgery
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Brigham and Women's Cancer Center

Dr. Tari A. King is the Anne E. Dyson Associate Professor of Surgery in the field of Women's Cancers at Harvard Medical School, the Chief of the Division of Breast Surgery and the Associate Chair of Multidisciplinary Oncology in the Department of Surgery at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Chief of Breast Surgery at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center. She is also the Director of the Breast Cancer Personalized Risk Assessment, Education and Prevention (B-PREP) Program at Brigham and Women's Hospital.

Dr. King received her medical degree from University Colorado Health Sciences Center and completed a general surgery residency at Ochsner Clinic Foundation Hospital (now Ochsner Medical Center) in New Orleans. She completed both a surgical research fellowship and a breast surgery clinical fellowship at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.


Christopher A. Klebanoff, MD
Investigator, Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Christopher A. Klebanoff is cellular immunologist and medical oncologist who has dedicated his career to understanding the fundamental biology of T lymphocytes and their interactions with cancer cells. Using diverse techniques including genetic engineering, single-cell sequencing, and biophysical measurements of T cell receptor affinity, his research addresses two factors limiting the application of cell therapy to common solid malignancies: 1) understanding which antigens on the surface of cancer cells can be targeted by T cells without injuring normal tissues, and 2) gaining insight into what factors restrain the ability of transferred T cells to infiltrate and persist within a solid tumor mass. 

Dr. Klebanoff is a member of the Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) Center for Cell Engineering and an investigator in the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy. Prior to coming MSK, he was an assistant clinical investigator and a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-Howard Hughes Medical Institute Research Scholar at the U.S. NIH in Bethesda, MD. He completed a post-doctoral and clinical fellowship in cellular immunotherapy with Drs. Steven A. Rosenberg, M.D./PhD and Nicholas Restifo, M.D. He has authored or co-authored over 60 manuscripts and reviews related to adoptive cancer immunotherapy, T cell biology, and T cell memory formation. Clinically, he has served as a PI or co-I on over a dozen T cell therapy clinical trials, including trials using tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), CAR, and TCR engineered T cells.



Moderator
Educational Session
"Breast Cell Fate Control and Plasticity"

Yi Li, PhD
Professor
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Yi Li is a Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology at Baylor College of Medicine.  He studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms of breast cancer initiation and evolution as well as breast cancer prevention. His laboratory pioneered the use of the RCAS-TVA avian retroviral system for modeling sporadic breast cancer in mice, delineated anticancer barriers during breast cancer initiation, discovered a molecular mechanism underlying increased breast cancer risk caused by late-age first pregnancy, and established intermittent anti-STAT5 for preventing breast cancer.



Speaker
Clinical Science Forum
"Brain metastases - clinical dilemmas and scientific challenges"

Nancy U. Lin, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Harvard Medical School

Nancy Lin, MD is the Associate Chief of Breast Medical Oncology for the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Director of the Metastatic Breast Cancer Program, and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.  Her research is focused upon developing novel therapies for patients with metastatic breast cancer and in understanding mechanisms of therapeutic resistance. 

She has led multiple trials of novel systemic approaches for metastatic breast cancer, including patients with breast cancer brain metastases. She has had national and international leadership roles, including serving as the overall PI of several multi-center studies, co-chair of the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology metastatic working group, Chair of the Friends of Cancer-American Society Modernizing Eligibility Criteria Project-Brain Metastasis Working Group, and membership in national and international guidelines committees for the management of metastatic breast cancer. 

Dr. Lin is also experienced in tissue- and blood-based translational research, and with the construction and analysis of clinical databases.  She is the PI of the breast oncology-specific tissue banking protocol at Dana-Farber, Co-Chair of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Clinical Data and Tissue Users’ Committee, and PI of active protocols allowing prospective consent for research biopsies with linked clinical data across all stages of breast cancer, and of the EMBRACE (Ending Metastatic Breast Cancer for Everyone) metastatic cohort study. She serves as the DF/HCC institutional PI for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium.  

Dr. Lin received her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and medical degree from Harvard Medical School. She subsequently completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and fellowships in hematology and medical oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.



Speaker
Year In Review
"Translational research"

Speaker
Workshop
"Approaches to targeting the anti-apoptotic machinery in breast cancer"

Geoffrey Lindeman, MD, PhD
Joint Division Head
The Walter & Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research



Speaker
Translational Science Forum
"CTC clusters, cancer stemness, and new treatment strategies"

Huiping Liu, MD, PhD
Associate Professor
Northwestern University

Dr. Liu was an assistant professor in the Ben May Department for Cancer Research at the University of Chicago from 2011 - 2013 and in the department of Pathology at Case Western Reserve University from 2103 - 2016. She is currently Associate Professor in the departments of Pharmacology and Medicine at Northwestern University.



Speaker
Translational Science Forum
Advanced enabling technologies for cancer proteomics"

Tao Liu, PhD
Senior Scientist
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Dr. Liu's work at PNNL has centered on developing and applying innovative methods and technologies that enable high-throughput, sensitive, and quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics measurements of complex biological and clinical samples. He has been instrumental in developing and applying novel technologies, including stable isotope labeling, enrichment of protein post-translational modifications and targeted proteomics, towards in-depth, robust and integrated characterization of cells, tissues and biofluids to discover and validate specific protein changes in diseases such as cancer. He is currently PI of the NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) Proteome Characterization Center (PCC) and the NCI Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) Biomarker Reference Laboratory (BRL), and the DOD Framingham projects as part of the Cancer Moonshot efforts.



Moderator
Clinical Science Forum
"Frontiers in HER2 Positive Breast Cancer"

Sibylle Loibl, MD
Chair/Chief Executive Officer
German Breast Group

Prof. Sibylle Loibl, MD, PhD, is the  Chair and Chief Executive Officer of the German Breast Group (GBG) one of the leading study groups worldwide. She devotes the majority of her time to clinical trial research at GBG and at her clinical affiliations University of Frankfurt, and Oncology Bethanien in Frankfurt. 

She is an associate professor at the University of Frankfurt. Prof. Loi graduated from the University of Heidelberg and completed her fellowship and residency as a gynecologist and obstetrician at the University of Heidelberg and Frankfurt. 

Prof. Loi is internationally renowned in the fields of neoadjuvant breast cancer, breast cancer during pregnancy, and breast cancer in young women. She has led and participated in more than 150 national and international clinical trials in the field of breast cancer. 

In 2014 she joined the Executive Board of the Breast International Group (BIG). As a medical expert, she serves on several international steering committees, translational research committees, and independent data monitoring committees.

Prof. Loibl has co-authored more than 300 MEDLINE-listed scientific papers, in addition to more than 200 original and peer-reviewed articles, as well as 29 books or book chapters, and she has actively contributed to more than 200 national and international congresses. She is an active member of numerous national and international organizations such as the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO).


Luca Magnani, PhD
Senior Research Fellow
Imperial College London

Dr. Magnani studied biotechnology at the university of Bologna and then moved into a PhD program at Purdue University (IN, USA). He then did post-doctoral training at  Dartmouth College/Norris Cotton Cancer Center/University of Toronto (with Mathieu Lupien) where he published work on breast cancer and chromatin remodeling. He moved to Imperial College in 2013 to start his group and currently works on many aspect of breast cancer biology. His laboratory studies cancer evolution and therapy resistance using patient samples and multi -omics approaches including single cell analysis. He was recently awarded with the prestigious CRUK Career Development Fellowship to tackle the issue of non-coding somatic mutations in breast cancer. He runs open-lab meeting with breast cancer patients, constantly engages with clinicians and nurses at ad hoc symposia and recurrently participates at numerous patient and public engagement events.



Presenter For
Debate
"Mastectomy should not be offered to patients who are breast conservation candidates when modern radiotherapy is available"

Lawrence B. Marks, MD, FASTRO
Professor and Department Chair
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine

Larry Marks was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York.  He studied chemical engineering at Cooper Union, and obtained his MD from the University of Rochester.  He did his residency training in radiation oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital 1986-1989, and then served on the faculty of Duke University for 19 years. There, he studied radiation-induced normal tissue injury and also became interested in human factors engineering and patient safety.  In 2008, he moved to UNC to become the Dr. Sidney K. Simon Distinguished Professor of Oncology Research, and the Chairman of the Department of Radiation Oncology. Over the last eleven years, his group has been systematically applying engineering principles from high reliability and value creation organizations to improve safety.  In his clinical work, he has particular interest in the care of patients with cancers of the breast or lung. He lives with his anesthesiologist wife of 34 years, Caryn Hertz, in Chapel Hill.  

His primary research focus has been aimed at improving the therapeutic ratio of radiation therapy, largely through reducing the normal tissue effects of radiation.  He has conducted several prospective clinical trials to better understand radiation-induced lung and heart injury for patients receiving radiation to the chest.  This work was funded for 19 years by a grant from the NIH and has also by the Lance Armstrong Foundation and the Department of Defense. 

Within radiation oncology, He is a national leader in the area of quality and safety, with a particular focus on human-factors engineering.  Their group studies the frequency and causes of “human-errors” in the radiation oncology clinic and implements systems aimed to reduce such errors.  The group is (and was) funded by the AHRQ (and the CDC).  He served on the Board of Directors of ASTRO (The American Society for Radiation Oncology; the leading professional organization in the field), as the Chair for Clinical Affairs and Quality.  In this capacity, he helped oversee efforts nationally to improve quality and safety within radiation oncology (e.g. helping to create a national registry to report radiation therapy errors, and defining best practices).  



Speaker
Educational Session
"Endocrine therapy beyond 2020 (metastatic, new agents)"

Erica L. Mayer, MD, MPH
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Harvard Medical School

Dr. Erica L. Mayer is a breast cancer clinician and clinical trialist at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) and Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), and an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School (HMS). Her research as a clinical investigator (40%) examines the role of novel biologic agents in breast cancer treatment. She spends 50% of her time caring for patients at all stages of breast cancer, including 4 new patients and 40 established patients per week, with regional and national referrals from throughout the Eastern United States. Additionally, she spends 5% in teaching and 5% in administration. 

Her research has focused on the role of novel biologic agents in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. Dr. Mayer has served as local and national PI for multiple phase I-IIII trials examining novel therapies for advanced breast cancer and has presented data from these studies at national conferences. She is currently Global PI of the Phase 3 International Randomized PALLAS Trial: PALbociclib CoLlaborative Adjuvant Study: A randomized phase III trial of Palbociclib with adjuvant endocrine therapy versus endocrine therapy alone for hormone receptor positive (HR+)/ human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative early breast cancer. Other areas of research interest include CardioOncology, and management of pregnancy associated breast cancer. 

Dr. Mayer's teaching role has focused on education of junior oncologists, including serving as DFCI Breast Fellowship Education Coordinator for the Dana-Farber/Partners CancerCare (DF/PCC) first year fellows, Director of our Advanced Fellowship in Breast Oncology, Director of DFCI Advanced Fellowship in Medical Oncology Specialties, and Assistant Director, DFCI Fellowship in Hematology/Oncology. She also teaches HMS students and BWH house officers in the outpatient setting and have mentored HMS students and BWH house officers. Dr. Mayer is a frequent speaker in both local and national CME settings. 

From 2009-2014 she served as Director of Clinical Research at DFCI/Faulkner, a role which included serving as PI for all DFCI/Faulkner studies, communicating with the DFCI Clinical Trials Office, and overseeing the research staff at Faculty Council, where she represents junior faculty and has led a project to create clinical titles for staff at DFCI. 

She was drawn to a career in medical oncology by her interest in providing longitudinal compassionate care, and her primary professional goal is to improve clinical outcomes in breast cancer patients. Her research focus on novel therapies ties together emerging laboratory discovery with rigorous clinical study, and eventually she hopes to play a greater role as PI on practice-changing national studies. Dr. Mayer’s roles in teaching and research administration improve the training of breast cancer specialists and ability to perform research in the community setting. She has greatly enjoyed creating a diversified career in academic oncology and hopes her work will impact future ability to care for breast cancer patients. 


Otto Metzger, MD
Medical Oncologist
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Metzger received his MD from Federal University of Minas Gerais in 2003 and completed training in Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology in 2008.  Following his formal training in Brazil, he spent three years at the Institute Jules Bordet in Brussels where he completed a research fellowship and initiated a career dedicated to understanding the biological features of the second most common histological subtype of breast cancer – invasive lobular carcinoma. Since joining the Breast Oncology Program at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in 2012, he has established an active clinical practice and developed research efforts focused on identifying better treatment strategies for patients diagnosed with breast cancer. He is involved in designing and leading national and international clinical trials with a strong translational component. In addition to his physician and clinical investigator roles, Dr. Metzger holds an Executive Officer position at the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology. 


Elizabeth A. Mittendorf, MD, PhD
Rob and Karen Hale Distinguished Chair in Surgical Oncology
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Brigham and Women's Cancer Center

Dr. Elizabeth A. Mittendorf is a graduate of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, OH where she also completed a residency in General Surgery. After completing her residency, she served on active duty in the United States military before completing a fellowship in Surgical  Oncology  at  the  University  of  Texas  MD Anderson  Cancer  Center in Houston, TX. Dr. Mittendorf also holds a PhD in Immunology from the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston. She is currently the Rob and Karen Hale Distinguished Chair in Surgical Oncology at the Dana-Farber/ Brigham and Women's Cancer Center where she also serves as the director of breast surgery  research,  the director  of the Breast  lmmuno-Oncology program  and  co-director  of the  overall  Breast  Oncology  Research  Program.  She also serves as the Surgical Oncology representative to the Board of the American Society  of Clinical  Oncology  and the co-chair  of the   National  Cancer  lnstitute's  Breast  Cancer  lmmuno-Oncology  task  force.

 Prior to joining Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Dr. Mittendorf was a Professor in the Department of Breast Surgical Oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX. She joined the faculty at MD Anderson in 2008. 

Dr. Mittendorf is board certified by the America Board of Surgery. She maintains a busy clinical practice and oversees a portfolio of clinical trials as well as a basic laboratory effort. She is principal investigator on a number of clinical protocols including the phase III PRESENT (Prevention of Recurrence in Early-Stage, Node-Positive Breast Cancer with Low to Intermediate HER2 Expression with NeuVax Treatment) study, and a multicenter phase II trial investigating the efficacy of a CD8+ T cell eliciting vaccine in combination with trastuzumab which is based on preclinical data generated in her laboratory and follows a phase I trial she conducted demonstrating the combination to be safe.  This trial is supported by a Breakthrough Award from the Department of Defense. She is also the principal investigator on a multi-center trial supported by the National Cancer Institute evaluating the impact of vaccination in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, a trial evaluating the impact of preoperative radiation therapy on the immune response in breast tumors, as well as two investigator initiated studies evaluating immune checkpoint blockade administered in the presurgical setting to breast cancer patients. Dr. Mittendorfs laboratory work is focused on identifying novel tumor antigens and investigating aspects of the tumor microenvironment that impact the response to immunotherapy. Specifically, she is investigating mutations in the ESR1 gene as targets for vaccination as well as the impact of standard therapies on the immune microenvironment with the goal of informing rational clinical trials evaluating the addition of immunotherapy to treatment regimens for breast cancer patients. This work is supported by the Kamen for the Cure Foundation and the Parker Institute for Cancer   lmmunotherapy. Dr. Mittendorf has published extensively on breast cancer immunotherapy as well as on subjects related to breast cancer and surgical management of the disease to include incorporation of biologic factors into staging, management of the axilla, and surgery following receipt of neoadjuvant chemotherapy.



Speaker
Clinical Science Forum
"New agents for HER2+ treatment"

Shanu Modi, MD
Medical Oncologist
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center



Speaker
Educational Session
"Immunotherapy in metastatic and neoadjuvant breast cancer"

Rita Nanda, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
The University of Chicago

Rita Nanda, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Co-Director of the Breast Medical Oncology Program at The University of Chicago. Dr. Nanda earned her undergraduate degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her Medical Degree from The University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine. She subsequently completed her Residency in Internal Medicine and her Fellowship in Hematology/Oncology at The University of Chicago. 

Dr. Nanda’s research interests include identifying novel treatments for the management of breast cancer, particularly triple-negative disease. She leads The University of Chicago’s clinical and translational breast cancer research efforts and serves as a Principal Investigator for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) and the ISPY2 Clinical Trial Network. She is a member of multiple professional organizations, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Association of Cancer Research, and the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer. 

Dr. Nanda has authored numerous scientific publications and book chapters, including one of the first reports of immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy for triple-negative breast cancer. She has been invited to present her research at national and international conferences. In recognition of her dedication to breast cancer research, Dr. Nanda has earned numerous awards, including the 2014 NCI Cancer Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Award. Her research has been funded by the NCI, the Department of Defense, the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, the Susan G. Komen Foundation, and the Metastatic Breast Cancer Research Network.



Panelist
Educational Session
"Conversations on Tough Topics Surrounding Cancer Care"

Katherine O'Brien
Patient Advocate
Metastatic Breast Cancer Network



Moderator
Special Session
"View From The Trenches-What Will You Do On Monday Morning?"

Ruth O'Regan, MD
Professor, Chief Hematology/Oncology and Palliative Care Division
University of Wisconsin
Carbone Cancer Center

Dr. Ruth O’Regan is the Division Head of Hematology/Oncology and Palliative Care in the Department of Medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. Dr. O’Regan is an internationally recognized breast-cancer physician and researcher with particular expertise on breast cancers that are resistant to current therapies. 

A native of Dublin, Ireland, Dr. O’Regan previously was a professor of hematology and medical oncology at Emory University, where she held the Louisa and Rand Glenn Family Chair in Breast Cancer Research. Additionally, Dr. O’Regan was the medical director at Glenn Family Breast Center of Emory University, director of the Breast Cancer Translational Research Program at the Winship Cancer Institute, and chief of hematology and medical oncology at the Georgia Cancer Center for Excellence at Grady Memorial Hospital. In her dedication to training the next generation of physicians, she served as vice chair for educational affairs in the department of hematology and medical oncology and as director of the hematology/oncology fellowship program at Emory University. With a highly active research program focused on identifying mechanisms of resistance to breast-cancer therapies and development of new therapies, Dr. O’Regan has been principal investigator for numerous grants and clinical trials. Her research group has made significant discoveries about the role of the PI3 Kinase-mTOR pathway in triple-negative breast cancer, showing that mTOR inhibition can sensitize breast-cancer cells to upstream growth-factor inhibitors. These discoveries resulted in a novel clinical trial for patients with metastatic breast cancer. 

Dr. O'Regan was previously a member of the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium Planning Committee, in addition to serving on numerous other committees, study sections and advisory boards. 



Moderator
The Year in Review

Charles Kent Osborne, MD
Director
Baylor College of Medicine
Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center

Dr. C. Kent Osborne was born in 1946 in St. Louis, Missouri. He received his AB and MD degrees from the University of Missouri, both with honors. He completed his internship and residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1974, and then spent three years as a clinical associate at the Medicine Branch, Breast Cancer Section of the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland. In 1977, he took his first faculty position at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, where he rose to the rank of Professor and became Director of the Division of Medical Oncology in 1992. In 1999, Dr. Osborne and his team moved to Baylor College of Medicine to develop a new multidisciplinary Breast Center and in 2005 he was named Director of the new Dan L Duncan Cancer Center at Baylor College of Medicine which achieved “comprehensive” designation under his leadership in 2015. 

Dr. Osborne is a physician scientist who has focused on breast cancer his entire career. His research interests include understanding the biology of breast cancer and then developing new treatment approaches for the disease. He has published extensively on the mechanisms by which hormonal therapies such as tamoxifen inhibit breast cancer growth and how breast cancers become resistant to these therapies. He has also studied the role of various growth factors in breast cancer development and progression, and more recently how these other growth factors can interact with estrogen to stimulate tumor growth. His laboratory is also focusing on the mechanisms by which breast cancers develop resistance to HER2-targeted therapies. For more than a decade Dr. Osborne was Chairman of the Breast Cancer Committee for the Southwest Oncology Group, where he directed numerous nationwide clinical trials investigating new treatment strategies for breast cancer patients. He was the Principal Investigator of the Baylor Breast Cancer Specialized Program of Research Excellence grant (for the last 20 plus years) which has been funded since the Program began in 1992. He recently stepped down from SPORE, so he could focus on other BCM Cancer Center needs / projects. 

Among his previous awards are the Komen Foundation Award, the Brinker International Award for Breast Cancer Research, the European Institute of Oncology Annual Breast Cancer Award, and the ASCO Bonadonna Award for Breast Cancer Research. Most recently, he received the 2018 AACR Distinguished Award for Extraordinary Scientific Achievement and Leadership In Breast Cancer Research. 

At Baylor College of Medicine, he is the Director of the Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center and Professor of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology. He currently holds the Tina and Dudley Sharp Chair in Oncology at Baylor College of Medicine.



Panelist
Special Session
"View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?"

Debra A. Patt, MD, MPH
Vice President
Texas Oncology

Dr. Debra Patt is a practicing oncologist and breast cancer specialist in Austin, Texas, and a vice president of Texas Oncology with responsibilities in healthcare policy and strategic initiatives. She is an active leader in breast cancer research, serves on the US Oncology Research breast cancer committee, and chairs the breast cancer subsection of the pathways task force for The US Oncology Network, which she has led for more than a decade. She has expertise in healthcare policy and has testified before Congress to protect access to care for Medicare beneficiaries. She is a leader in clinical cancer informatics and is involved in system innovations to enhance care delivery. She is the Editor in Chief of the Journal of Clinical Oncology- Clinical Cancer Informatics. 

She led healthcare informatics for The US Oncology Network from 2008-2015 and continues to lead analytics as a medical director for McKesson Specialty Health. In addition to a substantial background in informatics and health economics and outcomes research, she directs public policy for Texas Oncology. Nationally, she is the past-chair of ASCO's clinical practice committee and serves on ASCO's nominating committee as well as the health IT work group and guidelines committees. 

Dr. Patt serves on the national board for the Community Oncology Alliance and local board of The Shivers Cancer Foundation. She serves on the Texas Medical Association's Council on Legislation and frequently speaks on healthcare policy at the state and federal level. She is a past chair for the Texas Medical Association's committee on cancer and has served on the council on science and public health. She is a former board member of Komen Austin and the breast cancer resource center. Dr. Patt is a nationally recognized leader in cancer research, has published many articles, and leads the service line for breast health services for the Dell Medical School in addition to leading multidisciplinary breast cancer conferences and directing breast cancer services for the Seton Family of Hospitals.



Speaker
Educational Session
"The biology and plasticity of residual disease"

Charles M. Perou, PhD
Professor of Genetics
University of North Carolina

Dr. Perou’s research over the past 21 years has focused on the genomics, genetics, and cell biology of breast cancers. This research crosses the disciplines of genomics, genetics, cancer biology, bioinformatics, epidemiology, and clinical research. A major focus of his lab has been on the characterization of the diversity of breast tumors that resulted in the discovery of the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer, and which also includes the Basal-like/Triple-Negative Breast Cancer subtype. His team has demonstrated that breast cancers can be divided into at least five molecular subtypes using the “PAM50” assay, with Dr. Perou’s lab focusing particular experimental attention on the Basal-like subtype.  They have also elucidated many of the genetic causes that give rise to each molecular subtype, modeled these events in Genetically Engineered Mouse Models, and then used these models to investigate tumor biology, immune system interactions, and the efficacy of novel drug combinations. He is currently the Co-Director of the UNC Computational Medicine Program, Co-Director of the LCCC Breast Cancer Program, and Faculty Director of the LCCC Bioinformatics Group. On a national level Dr. Perou serves as Vice Chair for Correlative Sciences for the ALLIANCE Breast Committee, and as an Executive Steering Committee Member of the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC).


Melissa L. Pilewskie, MD
Assistant Attending
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Pilewskie is a surgical  breast  oncologist  with  a  clinical  practice dedicated to the management of breast diseases at  Memorial  Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. One of her research interests includes assess strategies to minimize axillary surgical morbidity following upfront breast cancer surgery. To this end she has authored papers on axillary imaging among  women meeting ACOSOG 211 criteria as well as strategies to decrease the likelihood of axillary lymph node dissection among clinically node negative breast cancer patients. In 2018 she presented on the topic of optimizing upfront axillary surgery at the American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress as well as on a Society of  Surgical Oncology Webinar.



Speaker
Plenary Lecture
"The Tumor Microenvironment and Immunosuppression"

Ellen Puré, PhD
Professor and Chair
University of Pennsylvania

Ellen Puré, PhD Is the Grace Lansing Lambert Professor and Chair of Biomedical Sciences and Founding Director of the Penn Vet Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania.  She received her Baccalaureate degree from Washington University and her doctorate from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School. She was a Damon Runyon-Walter Winchell Postdoctoral Fellow and Leukemia Society Special Fellow at the Rockefeller University where she then joined the Faculty. Dr. Puré later joined the faculty of the Wistar Institute (1992-2013) in Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania (1992-present). Dr. Puré’s research focuses on the cellular and molecular basis of inflammation and fibrosis and the contribution of these processes to disease with a particular emphasis on cancer. Her lab is studying the role of stromal cells and extracellular matrix in cancer initiation, progression and metastasis and using this knowledge to develop stroma-targeted therapies to use in combination with therapies that target malignant cells and immune-modulatory therapies for the treatment of solid tumors. Dr. Puré is an Associate Director of the Cancer Research Institute and has served on the scientific advisory committee of Stand Up 2 Cancer, the German Research Fund and the review panel for the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. She currently serves as a Founding Senior Editor for Cancer Immunology Research, a consulting Editor for the Journal of Clinical Investigation and Editor of Matrix Biology.  She has trained numerous predoctoral, postdoctoral and clinical fellows and has for many years co-Directed a course on the Tumor Microenvironment at the University of Pennsylvania.



Moderator
Educational Session
"Conversations on Tough Topics Surrounding Cancer Care"

Susan W. Rafte
Community Advocate
Baylor College of Medicine

Susan Rafte is a 24-year metastatic breast cancer survivor. Since her diagnosis in 1994, she has been an active community volunteer, patient advocate and has dedicated and volunteered most of her time to raise awareness about breast health, provide peer-to-peer support to help others who have been  touched by breast cancer and be the patient voice at the table to forward breast cancer research. Alongside my sister, Jane Weiner, we co-founded Pink Ribbons Project, a non-profit organization and during its 21-year existence it raised more than $6,000,000 to help in the fight against breast cancer. Several awards demonstrate her contributions in breast cancer advocacy and education. As an involved patient advocate and through her experiences that she has gained by being a part of the breast cancer community, I am enabled and qualified to serve as an advocate on scientific research committees to represent the voice of  other patients.  Susan is experienced to be a mentor to review scientific grant applications to ensure terminology is understandable to a general, non-scientific audience and to convey the importance and overall impact of the project on breast cancer research and patient needs, concerns and care. She also can develop and review the scientific sections to help communicate the importance of the project to breast cancer patients and their families and discuss other ways to be involved with the research grants. On a regular basis, I am committed to participate in meetings, to provide to the Investigators and others involved in the research, patient focused feedback and input on the impact of the project on patients by identifying the translational potential of this research. Susan is  firmly committed to helping achieve the goals of breast cancer research.


Eileen Rakovitch, MD, MSc, FRCPC
Radiation Oncologist
Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre

Dr. Rakovitch is a radiation oncologist with an active clinical practice and research program solely focused on breast cancer. She attended medical school and completed her residency training in Radiation Oncology at the University of Toronto. She completed a two-year research fellowship at the Center for Radiological Research at Columbia University in New York City and then returned to Toronto to join the staff at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre where she remains until today.  

She is a Professor and Scientist in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Toronto and an Adjunct Scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. She is the L.C. Campbell Chair in Breast Cancer Research at the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, the Head of the Breast program at Sunnybrook and is the Medical Director of the Louise Temerty Breast Cancer Centre.  She is the next co-chair of the National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC) Breast Cancer Executive, which leads and contributes to clinical trials improving the treatment of breast cancer.  She is dedicated to teaching students, residents and fellows across the educational spectrum. 

The primary goal of her research program is to improve the care and outcomes of women with an early form of breast cancer called ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). DCIS is very common representing 1 in 4 breast cancers.  Dr. Rakovitch and her research team are dedicated to improving our understanding of DCIS. She collaborates with researchers internationally and is working to develop genomic tests that can improve the treatment of DCIS by determining which women have aggressive disease and require treatment from those who do not and can be spared aggressive treatment.


Pedram Razavi, MD, PhD
Medical Oncologist
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Pedram Razavi is an Assistant Member of the Department of Medicine at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Razavi received his Medical Degree from the Tehran University of Medical Sciences in Iran. He completed a PhD in Cancer Epidemiology at the University of Southern California in 2009 followed by a post-doctoral training in collaboration with the Channing Laboratory at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He trained in Internal Medicine at the University of Southern California and completed his Medical Oncology training at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. He joined the Breast Medicine Service of MSKCC in 2016 with a practice dedicated to the care of patients with breast cancer. Dr. Razavi’s research efforts have focused on two major areas: 1) integrative analyses of genomic and clinical data to guide translational research in breast cancer, and 2) the exploration of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) as a platform to identify targetable genomic alterations, define drug resistance mechanisms and re-classify NED patients based on “minimal residual disease”. Dr. Razavi has led studies defining the genetic basis of resistance to hormone therapy in hormone-positive breast cancer patients and the identification of novel genetic mechanisms of resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors. He is currently leading multiple studies to define the clinical utility of ctDNA, and to develop new technologies to profile ctDNA. 


Meredith Regan, ScD
Associate Professor
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Harvard Medical School

Dr. Regan is Associate Professor, Division of Biostatistics, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School. She received her doctorate in biostatistics from the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health. She is Group Statistician and Director of the Statistical and Data Management Center for the International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) and Director of the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core for the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center Breast Cancer SPORE. She served on the NCI Breast Cancer Steering Committee and as co-director of the AACR/ASCO Methods in Clinical Cancer Research Workshop. She serves on the EBCTCG Steering Committee and St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference Scientific Committee.



Speaker
Clinical Science Forum
"Heterogeneity of HER2+ breast cancer"

Andrea L. Richardson, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Pathology
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Dr. Richardson received her pathology residency training at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston MA and completed a fellowship in breast pathology. She practiced breast pathology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, MA for 18 years. Since 2015, Dr. Richardson has been Director of Pathology and Director of Breast Pathology at Johns Hopkins Medicine, National Capital Region, Washington, DC. In addition to clinical practice, she is also a translational breast cancer scientist with a focus on triple negative breast cancer and predictors of response to therapy.



Moderator
Educational Session
"Endocrine Therapy 2020"

Moderator
Case Discussions

Mothaffar Rimawi, MD
Executive Medical Director
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Rimawi is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Executive Medical Director of the Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center as well as co-Leader of the Breast Cancer Research program of the Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center (DLDCCC) at Baylor College of Medicine. He received his medical degree from the University of Jordan School of Medicine and completed his training in Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, and Breast Oncology at Baylor College of Medicine. 

His research is focused on designing and conducting biologically driven clinical trials to translate laboratory findings into new clinical treatments and studying biomarkers of response and resistance. This will help elucidate mechanisms of therapeutic resistance to design more tailored treatment approaches, and to identify a treatment de-escalation strategy to spare patients’ unnecessary toxicity and cost when possible, without compromising outcomes. 

Dr. Rimawi has designed, led, and reported multiple biologically-driven national and international trials in breast cancer with special focus on translational work in HER2+ and in ER+ breast cancer. He serves on multiple national clinical research leadership committees including the Breast Committee of the NRG Oncology Group and is co-Chair of the HER2 Working group of the Translational Breast Cancer Symposium (TBCRC).



Speaker
Educational Session
"Assessment of PD-L1/PD-1: If, when, why and how"

David L. Rimm, MD, PhD
Professor
Yale University School of Medicine

Dr. David Rimm is a Professor in the Departments of Pathology and Medicine (Oncology) at the Yale University School of Medicine. He is the Director of Yale Pathology Tissue Services. He completed an MD-PhD at Johns Hopkins University Medical School followed by a Pathology Residency at Yale and a Cytopathology Fellowship at the Medical College of Virginia. He is boarded in Anatomic and Cytopatholgy. 

His research lab group focuses on quantitative pathology using the AQUA® technology invented in his lab, and other quantitative methods, with projects related to predicting response to both targeted and immune- therapy in cancer and standardization of those assays for CLIA labs. His lab is involved in testing  new high-plex methods including imaging mass cytometry (Fluidigm) and digital spatial profiling (NanoString) He also has supported projects related to rapid, low cost diagnostic tests and direct tissue imaging. The work is supported by grants  from the NIH, BCRF, and sponsored research agreements from biopharma. He also serves on the CAP lmmunohistochemistry committee  and multiple scientific advisory boards for biotech and pharma.

He is an author of over  375 peer-reviewed  papers  and 8 patents.


Christina Scheel, MD
Group Leader
Helmholtz Center Munich
Institute of Stem Cell Research

Christina Scheel graduated as a Medical Doctor from the University of Dusseldorf in Germany in 2003 and received her Medical License in 2004. She performed postdoctoral training and worked as a researcher in the laboratory of Robert A. Weinberg at the Whitehead Institute of Biomedical Research in Cambridge, MA from 2003-2012. In April 2012, Christina Scheel started her laboratory as a Max Eder fellow of the German Cancer Aid Foundation (Deutsche Krebshilfe) at the Institute of Stem Cell Research of the Helmholtz Center Munich, the German Research Center for Environmental Research. Christina Scheel received tenure in 2016 and leads the research program "Models for Precision Medicine" at Helmholtz Center Munich. Her group focusses on developing human model systems that capture dynamic plasticity at the single-cell level to understand mechanisms of tissue formation and tumorigenesis as the basis to understand individual patient responses. For this purpose, the Scheel laboratory developed an  organoid assay that recapitulates branching morphogenesis and examines context-dependent responses to transcription factors that elicit plasticity during tumor progression (Linnemann JR et al., Development 2015, Schmidt JM et al., Cell Reports, 2015, Britschgi A. et al., Nature 2017). Christina Scheel chaired the Gordon Conference for Mammary Gland Biology in 2018 and has been elected to the committee of the European Network of Breast Development and Cancer Labs (ENBDC).



Moderator
Translational Science Forum
"The Communal Road to Metastasis: CTC Clusters"

Rachel Schiff, PhD
Associate Professor 
Baylor College of Medicine
Lester & Sue Smith Breast Center

Dr. Schiff is an Associate Professor at the Baylor College of Medicine, Lester & Sue Smith Breast Center and the Departments of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology. She is an internationally recognized expert in breast cancer translational research with extensive experience in preclinical in vivo therapeutic and resistance models for various targeted therapies, as well as in correlative studies and associated biomarkers in clinical trials. Dr. Schiff received her PhD from the Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School in Jerusalem and completed her post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio. 

Dr. Schiff's research focuses on understanding the key signaling pathways in breast cancer and on identifying therapeutic strategies to overcome them, particularly treatments targeting the estrogen receptor and the HER2 receptor. Major research themes include the crosstalk between the ER signaling network and growth factor and cellular kinase pathways, the role of ER co-regulators and pioneer factors in breast cancer development and progression, the identification of genomic and epigenomic alterations underlying resistance to endocrine and HER2-targeted therapies, and the development of biomarkers for tailored therapeutic interventions. Dr. Schiff's research is partly supported by grants from the National Cancer Institute, The Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, and the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program. 

Dr. Schiff has co-authored over 100 peer-reviewed manuscripts and several book chapters in key textbooks in the breast cancer field.


Peter Schmid, MD, PhD, RECP
Professor of Cancer Medicine
Barts Cancer Institute
Queen Mary University of London

Professor Peter Schmid was appointed as Chair in Cancer Medicine at Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University London, in 2013. He is Clinical Director of the Breast Cancer Centre at the St. Bartholomew Cancer Centre and Honorary Consultant Medical Oncologist at Barts Hospital. Professor Schmid is also Lead of the Centre of Experimental Cancer Medicine at Barts Cancer Institute and the Barts/Brighton Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre. He leads the academic breast cancer programmes and the cancer immune therapy group at Barts Cancer Institute. 

Professor Schmid trained in medicine at Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Technical University of Munich and University of Aberdeen. He was awarded scholarships by the ‘Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes’, the ‘Hanns-Seidel-Foundation’, and the ‘Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst’. Professor Schmid completed a MD on mitochondrial creatine kinase at the Technical University Munich. He subsequently trained at the University Hospital Charité in Berlin in internal medicine, haematology and oncology, where he became head of breast cancer research and the phase I programme. He completed his PhD at the Charité University in Berlin in 2005 and was awarded the “habilitation and venia legendi” and an external readership by the Charité University in 2006. From 2005-2010, Prof. Schmid was a Senior Clinical Lecturer and Director of the Hammersmith Early Clinical Trials Unit at Imperial College London. In 2010, he was appointed as Foundation Chair in Cancer Medicine at the University of Sussex, and he was Director of the Clinical Investigation and Research Unit at Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals until his move to Barts. 

Professor Schmid’s specialist cancer interests are breast and lung cancer, cancer immune therapy and early drug development. His research interests lie in stratified cancer medicine utilising novel biomarkers and innovative, biomarker-driven clinical trial strategies to develop new treatment strategies. Professor Schmid has successfully led more than 20 national/international academic clinical studies, ranging from phase I to III, and several translational research programmes. He leads a collaborative group to establish circulating tumour DNA as a biomarker and is principal investigator of 2 ongoing, prospective international biomarker studies on predictive epigenetics from circulating tumour DNA. 

Professor Schmid is a member of several national and international cancer organizations and research groups and has been involved in international consensus meetings on the management of breast cancer. Professor Schmid is a member of ESMO breast cancer Faculty, the UK NCRN breast cancer study group and of the breast cancer and translational research steering groups of the German cooperative group of medical oncology. He has authored or –co-authored 165 publications and has published a book on the management of bone metastases (3rd edition).



Panelist
Special Session
"View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?"

Barbara Segarra-Vázquez, MT, DHSc
Dean-School of Health Professions
University of Puerto Rico

Barbara Segarra-Vazquez, D.H.Sc., has been a faculty at the University of Puerto Rico for 30 years, and is the Dean of the School of Health Professions and one of the Principal Investigators of the Hispanic Clinical and Translational Research Education and Career Development (HCTRECD) program (R25MD007607) funded by NIH. Dr. Segarra-Vazquez was diagnosed with breast cancer Stage IIB on December 2003 and was in remission for 13 years. On January 2017, she had a recurrence of metastatic breast cancer to the skin. A volunteer for Komen Puerto Rico since 2006, she was Board President for four years, during which they received the "Promise Award 2013" for their commitment to innovation and forward thinking in reducing overall breast cancer mortality She is a member of the Puerto Rico Cancer Control Coalition, currently serving as the leader of the survivorship committee. She has served several times as a consumer reviewer for the Breast Cancer Research Program of the Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs and traveled to Kamen Global Initiative to meet with different groups that provided services to breast cancer patients and participate in a public activity of breast. She is the Vice-Chair of Steering Committee for Kamen Advocates in Science, and is a member of SWOG Patient Advocates Committee. She is the founder and co-investigator of HIDEAS (Hispanics Increasing Diversity to Enhance Advocacy in Science). cancer awareness. 

Dr. Segarra-Vazquez is a medical technologist and she received her D.H.Sc. from Nova Southeastern University. She is a member of Komen's Advocates in Science Steering Committee.


Violeta Serra, PhD
Group Leader
Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology

Since 2014 Dr. Serra has lead VHIO' s Experimental Therapeutics Group, where she has focused her research into the understanding of the mode of action and mechanisms of resistance of targeted therapies in ER+ and triple negative breast cancers -­ specifically in CDK4/6- and in PARP-inhibitors. The work in her group using patient-derived xenoimplant models has been pivotal to understand that many BRCA1-associated tumors restore DNA repair by homologous recombination as a mechanism of resistance to PARP inhibitors, now published in Annals of Oncology and EMBO Mol Med (2018). They have developed the RAD51 immunofluorescence assay to be used in FFPE tumors from treatment-naif patients and are currently validating their preclinical findings in large clinical cohorts. This work has been recently presented at the Keystone Symposia on DNA Repair and Genomic Instability (2019).   

To establish herself as an independent Principal Investigator, she has been awarded with Project Grants from the Spanish Ministry of Health, a Career Catalyst Research Grant from the Susan G. Komen Foundation and from Breast Cancer Now. Dr. Serra is a member of the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR) since 2007, serve on the Editorial Board of Clinical Cancer Research, and is also ad-hoc reviewer for Cancer Research, Clinical Cancer Research , Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, and Breast Cancer Research.


Simona Shaitelman, MD
Associate Professor 
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Shaitelman will be speaking as a content specialist in an educational session regarding the selection of partial breast and whole breast irradiation. Her early publications pertained to accelerated partial breast irradiation. She published the first manuscript analyzing outcomes of patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using a brachytherapy catheter compared to American Society for Radiation Oncology consensus statement guidelines on the application of this treatment. She also analyzed factors associated with toxicity in the delivery of external beam-based partial breast irradiation. Additionally, and conducted medical physics research on novel means of delivering partial breast irradiation using alternatives to the traditional configuration of a linear accelerator as well as comparing the tissue targeted with accelerated partial breast irradiation delivered via brachytherapy versus external beam radiotherapy. Dr. Shaitelman was also the first author of a prospective, randomized trial of hypofractionated versus conventionally fractionated whole-breast irradiation examining acute and short-term toxic effects. This trial showed that women treated with the shorter course of irradiation have less acute and short-term fatigue and less trouble meeting the needs of their family.



Panelist
Special Session
"View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?"

Joseph Sparano, MD
Medical Oncologist 
Montefiore Medical Center

Dr. Sparano is a medical oncologist at Montefiore Medical Center. 



Speaker
Workshop
"How to talk to patients about participating in clinical trials"

Patricia Spears, BSc
Patient Advocate 
University of North Carolina
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center

Patricia Spears has been a Scientific Research Manager and Patient Advocate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center since 2017.  She is leading two advocacy groups, the Patient Research Advocacy Group (all cancers) and the UNC Breast SPORE Advocate Core, who bring the patient voice to basic and clinical research at UNC Lineberger.  As a breast cancer survivor of almost 20 years and a participant in two clinical trials, she can speak from the experience of a patient.  Additionally, many of her family members are cancer survivors and participated in clinical trials. 

She has been a volunteer in clinical trials for many years. Since 2008 she has been involved with the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology (previously CALGB) on the Breast Cancer Committee and Patient Advocate Committee and has also been chair of the Patient Advocate Committee since 2017 and Associate Group Chair for Advocacy since 2018.  She also served on the Data Safety Monitoring Board and on the Board of Trustees and has been involved in the NCI, NCTN Accrual Core Team as an Alliance patient advocate representative.  Ms. Spears has been an advocate for Duke (209-2013) and UNC (2018-present) on the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium, involved in mostly phase II studies. 

She has been involved in several NCI committees including the Breast Cancer Steering committee from 2009 - 2013 and again beginning 2019 and is currently serving a second term on the Core Correlative Science Committee which began in 2015. 

Ms. Spears has served on several ASCO guideline panels including HER-2 Testing in Breast Cancer Guideline Panel and the Post Mastectomy Radiation Therapy (PMRT) Guideline Panel and is also a member of the ASCO Targeted Agent and Profiling Utilization Registry (TAPUR), Molecular Tumor Board (MTB) and recently participated as a review committee member for ASCO Young Investigator Awards. She recently joined the ASCO-Friends of Cancer Research-FDA Broadening Eligibility Criteria Project Planning Group, for phase 2 of this project.  

She has been involved in several meeting planning committees including Accelerating Anticancer Agent Development and Validation Workshop (2015-2018) and the Advocate Fundamentals (2017-2018) and recently served as a co-chair on the 2019 AAACR Annual Meeting Planning Committee and the NASEM 2019 Health Literacy in Clinical Trials Workshop.  

Ms. Spears has been given many national presentations on various topics including patient engagement (FDA, FORCE), patient reported outcome measurements (AAADV, AACR, ISOQoL, NCPF), Clinical trails (ACS) and Survivorship (AACR) and has had the opportunity to be a panelist on the "view from the trenches' SABCS session in 2017 and then again in 2018 (replacement).  

She has had the honor to receive several awards beginning with the New Volunteer of the Year Award from National Susan G. Komen in 2002 and then won the Maureen Jordan-Thomas Spirit of Survivorship Award from her local Komen Affiliate in 2003.   In 2013 she received a patient advocate award for her participation in the NCI CaBIG program and has more recently received two additional awards from her local Komen Affiliate for her Race for the Cure participation, the Jeanne Peck Award in 2015 and most recently the Spirit to Inspire Award in 2018.


Corey Speers, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor 
University of Michigan

Dr. Speers is an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center. He completed his medical and graduate degrees in the MSTP program at Baylor College of Medicine before completing his residency in radiation oncology and Holman Pathway training at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. After joining the faculty at the University of Michigan as a physician scientist, he has continued his research exploring the biology of aggressive breast cancers, including inflammatory and triple-negative breast cancer. His laboratory is interested in “bench to bedside” research that includes basic mechanistic studies, translational pre-clinical studies, and clinical research. As PI or co-Investigator on several university-, industry-, private foundation- and NIH-funded grants, he remains active in the radiation and breast cancer research arena by looking for more effective, targeted therapies for women with breast cancer. His interest in targeted therapies include PARP-inhibitors, cell cycle checkpoint kinase inhibitors, and androgen receptor antagonists as agents for radiosensitization. In addition, his research group has a number of clinically oriented and bioinformatics based studies that focus on the nomination and validation of expression-based signatures to predict breast cancer patients that need treatment intensification and signatures to identify patient who will not need further adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. Finally, his translational work focuses on correlative studies looking at biospecimens from clinical trials to uncover ways to predict treatment efficacy and toxicity. 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Clinical indications of PARP1 inhibitors and other targets"

Melinda L. Telli, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Stanford University School of Medicine



Speaker
Workshop
"Window versus neoadjuvant trial - choose wisely"

Presenter Against
Debate
"Mastectomy should not be offered to patients who are breast conservation candidates when modern radiotherapy is available"

Alastair M. Thompson, BSc (HONS), MB ChB, MD, FRCSEd
Professor of Surgery
Baylor College of Medicine

Over the last 35 years, Dr. Thompson has trained and practiced as a clinician scientist focused latterly on multidisciplinary patient care alongside translational "bench to bedside" studies and innovative clinical trials in breast cancer. he has initiated and led a successful breast cancer laboratory program, led a cancer center, chaired the United Kingdom national breast cancer trials portfolio of 120 studies and engaged in a range of pivotal roles in key drug, radiation therapy and surgical trials involving the UK, Europe, the United States and Australia. Since moving to the US in 2014, he has specialized in treating breast cancer patients with innovative localization techniques for breast conservation and axillary node surgery to minimize patient impact through to skin sparing and nipple sparing mastectomy with autologous reconstruction where required.  

Unusual for a surgeon, he has preclinical and practical experience in the design, implementation, monitoring and reporting of early through to late phase trials. Overall these focus on delivering the best treatment to the right patient. Recent pharmaceutical experience includes active steering group membership of international trials such as the SOLE, MA32, MINDACT, KRISTINE trials; he currently chair phase II and phase Ill data monitoring committees and trials steering groups. For radiotherapy, he co-authored the ASTRO ABPI consensus guidelines and have contributed to the TARGIT trial and hypofractionation trials. Current surgical trials leadership highlights the need to reduce overtreatment of selected groups of women and includes co-chairing the Comparison of Operative to Monitoring and Endocrine Therapy (COMET) Trial for low risk DCIS, co-chairing the NCI-BCSC proposed "no surgery" clinical trial planning committee and membership of the NCI BOLD taskforce. IDr. Thompson holds leadership positions within TBCRC (Loco-regional Subgroup Co-Chair) and SWOG (Translational Medicine Breast Group Chair) and active membership of ASCO and AACR.  

With substantial peer reviewed funding from governmental and charitable sources linking laboratory to clinical studies, successful supervision of 24 postgraduate students and some 350 peer reviewed publications in the highest impact factor clinical and scientific journals, improved care of those with breast cancer remains his key mission.



Speaker
Year In Review
"Early breast cancer"

Masakazu Toi, MD, PhD
Professor
Kyoto University

Dr. Masakazu Toi graduated in 1982 from Hiroshima University School of Medicine with his Medical Doctorate and in 1988 with his Ph.D.  He studied on tumor angiogenesis at the Institute of Molecular Medicine of Oxford University, UK from 1990 to 1992. He was appointed to the Department of Clinical Oncology, John-Radcliffe Hospital of Oxford University as an academic visitor as well. From 1992 to 2007, Dr. Toi worked for Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Disease Center. He was appointed to a director of Surgery and also to a director of Clinical Trial Department. He was engaged in the care of breast cancer patients, laboratory researches and clinical trials.  In 2000, he studied at Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute of Harvard University as a Yamagiwa-Yoshida fellow. Dr. Toi has been appointed to be a visiting professor of Drug Delivery System Center, Tokyo Science University.   Since 2007 Dr. Toi has been appointed to Professor of Breast Surgery at the Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, and Director of the Breast Cancer Unit, Kyoto University Hospital. Dr. Toi is involved in his study of cancer, particularly breast cancer.  He has been engaged in various clinical trials, such as global trials for new agents, development of new devices and translational researches. Dr. Toi is a founder and a member of board of directors of Japan Breast Cancer Research Group. He initiated a research organization, the Organisation for Translational  Research and Oncology as well.  He serves as an editorial board member of multiple academic journals and has authored or co-authored over 450 articles. Dr. Toi has been involved in the panel member of St Gallen Breast Cancer Consensus Conference, and Kyoto Breast Cancer Consensus Conference. Dr. Toi is a member of the board of directors of the Japanese Breast Cancer Society, and he is engaged in the 26th 2018 conference chair of  the JBCS. He has been appointed to Deputy Director of the Society-Academia Collaboration for Innovation of Kyoto University from 2016.


Nadine Tung, MD
Director, Cancer Genetics and Prevention Program
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Dr Tung is a breast medical oncologist who specializes in cancer genetics. She is the director of breast medical oncology as well as the Cancer Genetics and Prevention Program at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, and the Dana-Farber Harvard Cancer Center. She did her undergraduate work at Princeton, attended Harvard Medical School and has been in the Harvard system since 1984. Her research focuses on cancer risk associated with germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes and the strategies to manage this risk through surveillance, medications, lifestyle and prophylactic surgery. Her research also investigates the phenotype of breast cancers associated with inherited risk and the optimal way to treat hereditary breast cancers. She has served as the Principal Investigator for several trials evaluating chemotherapy and PARP inhibitors in hereditary breast cancer:  the INFORM trial (TBCRC 031) comparing platinum to standard anthracycline-based chemotherapy (TBCRC 031) and Olaparib Expanded (TBCRC 048) evaluating olaparib in women with germline or tumor somatic mutations in DNA damage response (DDR) genes other than BRCA1 or BRCA2. Dr Tung ialso researches novel delivery models for conducting germline genetic esting and is  one of the Principal Investigators for the BFOR (BRCA Founder Outreach) Study evaluating an online digital platform for BRCA testing She serves on the ASCO Prevention committee, and previously served as the Chair for the ASCO Genetics subcommittee; she is an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School. 


Geoffrey Wahl, PhD
Daniel and Martina Lewis Chair
The Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Dr. Geoffrey Wahl is a cancer biologist, having done research in mechanisms of drug resistance, genome instability, and most recently, mammary development.  They are interested in the problem of how intra-tumoral heterogeneity arises, and how this leads to problems associated with diagnosis and treatment, especially with targeted therapies.  Their work over the past decade has centered around understanding normal mammary development and how breast cancers reacquire some of the characteristics present in the most primitive, bipotent stem cells of the developing mammary gland.  While they use mice as the model for their studies, they find that their results have relevance to human breast cancer. In specific, they have identified when the bipotent stem cells of the mammary gland arise using in vitro and in vivo functional assays (mammosphere formation and limiting dilution transplantation).  They have then used single cell RNA-sequencing and ATAC-seq to better understand the molecular pathways and regulators of the cell state transitions that occur during the specification of the earliest mammary progenitors from their skin antecedents, and then how these become lineage restricted to generate the luminal and basal cell progenitors that sustain the adult gland. Finally, they have used this transcriptomic and chromatin accessibility data to analyze mouse models of mammary cancer, and human breast cancer to understand the relationships between cancer development, metastasis, and normal developmental programs.  The latter studies demonstrated how a significant subset of basal-like triple negative human breast cancers, and several mouse models, have cells that reprogram to a neural-crest like state, which is associated with the acquisition of motility and invasiveness.


Ralph R. Weichselbaum, MD
Daniel K. Ludwig Distinguished Professor and Chair
University of Chicago

Ralph R. Weichselbaum, MD, specializes in the treatment of potentially curative treatment of "oligo" metastasis with radiotherapy.

Dr. Weichselbaum's research interests include mechanisms of tumor spread and how radiation therapy and immunotherapy can be used to better treat cancer. He is also studying patterns of gene expression in human tumors that confer resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Weichselbaum invented a radio-inducible form of gene therapy TNFerade, which is currently in clinical trials. His research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health for more than 35 years.

He is also editor of Cancer Medicine, a definitive reference textbook compiled to help oncologists and internists apply scientific principles to clinical practice.



Speaker
Year In Review
"Basic science"

Alana L. Welm, PhD
Professor
University of Utah
Huntsman Cancer Center

Dr. Welm completed her PhD in Cell and Molecular Biology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX under the supervision of Gretchen Darlington, PhD. She then went on to conduct postdoctoral training in nobel laureate Dr. J. Michael Bishop’s laboratory at the University of California, San Francisco where her work focused on developing new models of breast cancer metastasis. Dr. Welm started her laboratory at the University of Utah’s Huntsman Cancer Institute in 2007, and was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure in 2013 and to full Professor in 2019. She now holds the Ralph E. and Willia T. Main Presidential Endowed Chair in Cancer Research and is Co-Director of the Cell Response and Regulation Program at Huntsman Cancer Institute.

The research in Dr. Welm’s laboratory is focused on solving the problem of breast cancer metastasis using in vivo modeling of mouse and human breast cancers. Dr. Welm’s group discovered that the Ron kinase pathway is an important facilitator of breast cancer metastasis through its unique dual function in tumor cells and in resident macrophages. Current areas of research include (1) pre-clinical studies of various Ron inhibitors for treatment and prevention of metastatic breast cancer; (2) pre-clinical and early clinical studies of the Ron/Met inhibitor BMS777607/ASLAN002 in bone metastatic cancers; (3) discovering molecular mechanisms by which Ron kinases promote metastasis through cell-autonomous and non cell-autonomous pathways; and (4) refining “precision medicine” for metastatic breast cancer using functional assays in patient-derived breast tumor grafts. 


Julia White, MD
Professor, Radiation Oncology
The Ohio State University
Stefanie Spielman Comprehensive Breast Center

Dr. Julia White is a board certified Radiation Oncologist with a clinical practice dedicated to breast cancer management. She is the Director of Breast Radiation at Ohio State University and disease lead for Breast Cancer Clinical Trials at The James, Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center.  Her research focuses on the development and implementation of novel local regional treatments for breast cancer patients. She has significant expertise in the development, execution, accrual, analysis, and oversight of clinical trials for breast cancer patients. Dr. White has been the co-chair of the  Breast Cancer Committee for NRG Oncology in the National Clinical Trail Network (NCTN) since 2013 and prior to that was the chair of the Breast Cancer Committee for the  Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) since 2007.    

Broadly, her research has focused on clinical trials aimed at improving outcome for breast cancer patients; 1. by the development of novel radiation treatment methods using advanced technology; 2. through trials aimed at tailoring local regional treatment based on biology and stage of disease and  3. by examining radiation in combination with novel agents.  As an example, she has been integral to the development of clinical trials studying new methods of post lumpectomy breast radiation for breast conserving therapy, including, Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation, hypo fractionated whole breast irradiation, prone breast radiotherapy as well as omission of radiotherapy.   

For more advance disease, she co-developed the ongoing the NSABP B51/ RTOG 1304 Phase III trial  evaluating regional nodal irradiation in node positive disease down staged to negative by neo adjuvant chemotherapy and  NRG BR001 (Phase 1)  and BR002  (Phase 2R/3) that is evaluating the benefit of  Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for first line treatment of  oligo-metastatic disease.  In addition she has collaborated in developing an supporting clinical trials across the NCTN with Alliance, SWOG and CCTG.   

Dr. White's experience has led to her involvement on numerous consensus statements and guidelines developed for breast cancer. As a result, she has many publications, book chapters and invited presentations regarding the local regional treatment of breast cancer.  



Speaker
Educational Session
"Progression of disease and end of life: How to break bad news"

Eric P. Winer, MD
Chief, Division of Women's Cancers
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Eric P. Winer is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Chief of Women’s Cancers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.  He is also Director of the Breast Oncology Program and the Thompson Chair in Breast Cancer Research.  He divides his time between clinical work, clinical research, and administration.  Since he joined the Harvard faculty in 1997, he has mentored over 20 fellows and junior faculty, the vast majority of whom have gone on to assume positions in major cancer academic cancer centers.  Dr. Winer has been the co-chair of the Breast Committee for the Cancer and Leukemia Group B and now the Alliance, but he stepped down from that role in May, 2016.  He is the leader of the Dana-Farber/Harvard SPORE (Specialized Program in Research Excellence) in breast cancer.   

Finally, he has served as the Chief Scientific Advisor to Susan G. Komen for the Cure since 2007.  Broadly defined, the focus of his research has been on improving the clinical care of women with breast cancer.  He has approached this task with a collaborative spirit, and has worked closely with colleagues in basic science, translational medicine, biostatistics, health services research, clinical oncology, and psychosocial research. 

Dr. Winer has conducted a wide array of Phase I, II, and III clinical trials in patients with breast cancer.  These trials have addressed all of the major biologic subtypes and all stages of the disease.