2018 Faculty

Speaker
Educational Session
“Updates on immunotherapy for TNBC”

Sylvia Adams, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine
New York University

Dr. Adams is a Medical Oncologist caring for patients with breast cancer. She also has expertise in the development and conduct of cancer immunotherapy trials. Her work has been awarded several grants from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI, K23 and R01). She has published several original research articles as well as reviews and book chapters on breast cancer and cancer immunotherapy. She is the Co-Chair for the Breast Immuno Oncology task force for NCI BCSC.

Dr. Adams received a Master of Science in Clinical Investigation at New York University in 2010 and serves as Vice Chair of the NYU-IRB.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 1 Developmental Therapeutics

Foluso Ademuyiwa, MD
Associate Professor
Washington University 

Foluso Ademuyiwa MD, MPH, MSCI, is a medical oncologist and Associate Professor at Washington University in St. Louis. Dr. Ademuyiwa earned a medical degree from the University of Ibadan in Nigeria, completed residency in Internal Medicine/Pediatrics at Bridgeport Hospital-Yale New Haven Health, and fellowship in Haematology/Oncology at Indiana University.

Dr. Ademuyiwa is board certified in Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and Medical Oncology. She serves as Principal Investigator for several investigator-initiated and cooperative group studies, and has authored more than 40 peer-reviewed articles published in scientific journals. Her research is focused on designing and conducting innovative clinical trials in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). She is also particularly interested in identifying biomarkers that predict chemotherapy failure and disease recurrence in TNBC patients. 

She has served on multiple grant review panels, including the AACR Breast Cancer Research Grants Scientific Review Committee and the Swiss Cancer League, and as an ad hoc manuscript reviewer for multiple journals over the years. 

In recognition of her clinical work, she has consistently been named as a " Best Doctor " in St. Louis for 2015 - 2018, and has been named as one of the 27 Top Breast Cancer Oncologists by Forbes in 2017.



Speaker
Workshop
"Molecular heterogeneity of TNBC: Biological implications"

Samuel Aparicio, PhD
Professor
University of British Columbia
BC Cancer Agency

Dr. Samuel Aparicio (BM, BCh, PhD, FRCPath, FRSC) is the Nan & Lorraine Robertson Chair in Breast Cancer Research UBC and Head of the BCCA's Department of Breast and Molecular Oncology, based in Vancouver, Canada since 2005. Dr. Aparicio graduated in medicine from Cambridge undertook clinical training in Oxford, subsequently in internal medicine and pathology. After doctoral work with Sydney Brenner in Cambridge he held a Wellcome Trust Career Development Fellowship at the Wellcome/CRUK Developmental Biology Institute. From 2000-2005 he was a senior investigator in the Department of Oncology, Cambridge. He was a co-leader of the international consortium that sequenced the genome of the pufferfish Fugu rubripes in 2002 and a visiting professor at the IMCB, Singapore. Dr Aparicio has most recently conducted foundational work on methods for studying the evolution of human cancers using next-generationsequencing approaches and single cell sequencing methods. Dr. Aparicio is also working to develop quantitative measures of clonal fitness in patients, including methods for single cell genome sequencing and patient derived xenograft models of human cancer. His work on the molecular taxonomy of breast cancer from the genome, led to identification new subtypes and genetic drivers of breast cancer through co-leadership of the METABRIC consortium. His group have defined the genetic and clonal structure of triple negative breast cancers, a hard to treat subtype that exhibits extreme genomic diversity. He was a co-founder of Paradigm Therapeutics (now, Takeda Cambridge) and currently Contextual Genomics Ltd. He was elected to the Royal Society of Canada in 2016 and is honored with being a Distinguished University Scholar with the University of British Columbia.   

As a physician-scientist, the key philosophy of Dr. Aparicio's program has been to provide a strong multidisciplinary environment for training of highly qualified personnel (HQP). His former trainees (career total 60) have gone on to success in academia: 1 institute director, 3 as Pis and others in medicine or in senior positions in industry or postgraduate education. All of his graduate students have been successful in securing national (CIHR, NSERC) or provincial (Michael Smith Foundation, CBCF BC/Yukon) competitive salary support and two of the four postdoctoral fellows are supported by independent peer reviewed salary awards from international (Australia), national (CBCF) and provincial (MSFHR) funding bodies.   

Dr. Aparicio has published over 160 papers in genomics and genetics of disease with >29,000 citations (H-index 70, i10 index 136). He has published in such high impact journals as: New England Journal of Medicine, Nature, Cell, Science, Nature Medicine, Nature Genetics, Nature Methods, Cell Stem Cell and Cell Metabolism.


Moderator
Translational Science Forum
"PI3K Pathway in Breast Cancer"

Moderator
Workshop
"Molecular Biology in Breast Oncology"

Carlos L. Arteaga, MD
Professor and Director
UT Southwestern
Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center

Dr. Carlos L. Arteaga, obtained his MD degree at the University of Guayaquil in Ecuador. He trained in Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology at Emory University and the University of Texas Health Sciences Center San Antonio, respectively. He joined Vanderbilt in 1989 where he served as Associate Director for Translational/Clinical Research, Director of the Center for Cancer Targeted Therapies and the Breast Cancer Program of the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC).

He has over 300 publications in the areas of signaling by growth factor receptors and oncogenes in breast tumor cells, development of targeted therapies and biomarkers of drug action and resistance, and investigator-initiated clinical trials in breast cancer. Since 2002, he directed the NCI-funded Vanderbilt Breast Cancer SPORE where he co-led several investigator-initiated clinical trials. His research is or has been funded by the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society, the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, Stand Up 2 Cancer (SU2C), the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation, and the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. He is member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation (1998) and the Association of American Physicians (2005). He served in the NCI Board of Scientific Counselors (1999-2004), NCI Parent Subcommittee A for review of Cancer Centers (2004-2008), the Breast Core Committee of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) and the Board of Directors of the American Association for Cancer Research (2004-2007). Arteaga is the recipient of the 2003 AACR Richard & Hinda Rosenthal Award, a 2007-2017 ACS Clinical Research Professor Award, the 2009 Gianni Bonadonna Award from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the 2011 Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction from the Komen Foundation, and the 2015 Prize for Scientific Excellence in Medicine from the American-Italian Cancer Foundation. He was elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2013 and Fellow of the AACR Academy in 2015, and serves in the Scientific Advisory Board of the Komen Foundation. He chaired the AACR Special Conference ‘Advances in Breast Cancer Research’ (2003-11) and has served as AACR co-chair of the annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium® since 2009. He was Deputy Editor of Clinical Cancer Research (2005-2013) and is member of the Editorial Board of Cancer Cell, Cancer Discovery and six other peer-reviewed journals. He serves in the advisory boards of several academic Breast Cancer Programs and NCI-designated Cancer Centers. He served as the 2014-2015 President of the American Association for Cancer Research, the largest cancer research organization in the world. In 2017, after a national search, he was appointed as Director of the Harold C. Simmons Cancer Center and Associate Dean for Oncology Programs at UT Southwestern Medical Center.


Speaker
Educational Session
"Practical approach to the axilla after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: What the clinical trials don't address"

Andrea V. Barrio, MD
Breast Surgeon
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Andrea V. Barrio, MD is an Assistant Attending on the Breast Surgical Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Assistant Professor of Surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College. Prior to this, she was an Attending Surgeon and Assistant Program Director of the Breast Fellowship Program at Bryn Mawr Hospital in Pennsylvania and Assistant Professor of Surgery at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University. She received her BS degree from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1996 and her MD from the University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine in 2001 where she was elected to membership of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. Dr. Barrio completed her surgical residency at New York Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical Center from 2001-2006, followed by one year of breast surgical oncology fellowship training at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

Dr. Barrio’s research interests include management of the axilla in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy and the study of lymphedema in early-stage breast cancer patients. She is currently the principal investigator of an investigator-initiated prospective study evaluating the incidence and etiology of lymphedema in breast cancer patients treated with axillary lymph node dissection and is also focusing on other methods of lymphedema prevention, namely minimizing the extent of axillary surgery. Based on high rates of nodal pathologic complete response seen in high risk breast cancer subtypes, she developed a prospective single-arm trial evaluating the technical feasibility and false-negative rate of sentinel lymph node biopsy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients presenting with locally advanced breast cancer.


 

Speaker
Mini-Symposium
"Artificial intelligence to optimize the accuracy and predictiveness of breast cancer pathology"

Andrew H. Beck, MD, PhD
Co-Founder and CEO
PathAI

Dr. Andrew H. Beck (Andy) earned his MD from Brown Medical School and completed residency and fellowship training in Anatomic Pathology and Molecular Genetic Pathology from Stanford University. He completed a PhD in Biomedical Informatics from Stanford University, where he developed one of the first machine-learning based systems for cancer pathology. He's been certified by the American Board of Pathology in Anatomic Pathology and Molecular Genetic Pathology. Prior to co-founding PathAI, he was on the faculty of Harvard Medical School in the Department of Pathology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. 

He has published over 110 papers in the fields of cancer biology, cancer pathology, and biomedical informatics.


 

Speaker
Year in Review
"Basic Science"

Robert Benezra, PhD
Member of the Cell Biology Program
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Robert Benezra, PhD has run a basic science laboratory at Memorial Sloan Kettering for over 25 years and has focused on the cancer biology of primary and metastatic breast cancer. This work puts him in a good position to try and critically evaluate some of the more exciting discoveries in this area over the past year.  His lab has focused on the reactivation of a fetal program in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. Id proteins are dominant negative transcription factors that are expressed at high levels in essentially all embryonic tissues and block the differentiation potential of partner proteins in the helix-loop-helix family. These proteins are reactivated in many breast cancer subtypes both at the primary and metastatic site and contribute to their proliferative and invasive status both of the tumor cells themselves and the supporting endothelium. High levels of the Id proteins are required for the conversion of a mesenchymal cell at a metastatic site to an epithelial-like state required for the formation of macro-metastatic lesions. This work has allowed Dr. Benezra to keep up with new major developments in the field related to changes in cell fate, cancer stem cell biology and effects of the tumor microenvironment on cancer progression. 

 

  

Discussant
Spotlight Session 8: What's New in Loco-Regional Therapy

Carmen Bergom, MD, PhD
Associate Professor 
Medical College of Wisconsin

Carmen Bergom, M.D., Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in Radiation Oncology at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW). She treats breast cancer patients at the MCW Cancer Center, and she also has a translational research laboratory focusing on using innovative genetic models to improve the therapeutic ratio radiation therapy by identifying targets to enhance tumor radiosensitivity and minimize normal tissue toxicities. She also is the Principal Investigator on a number of breast cancer clinical trials. Dr. Bergom obtained undergraduate degrees in Chemical Engineering and Biology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a Master’s degree in Epidemiology at Cambridge University, and M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from MCW.  She completed her medical residency in Radiation Oncology at MCW.  During her residency, she was named a Leonard B. Holman Research Pathway Fellow by the American Board of Radiology. Throughout her training and career, Dr. Bergom has been interested in coupling basic research findings with translational and clinical research.  


 

Moderator
Educational Session
"Metabolic Reprogramming in Breast Cancer"

Alexander Bishop, DPhil, BSc
Associate Professor of Cell Systems and Anatomy
Greehey Children's Cancer Research Institute
UT Health San Antonio

Dr. Alexander Bishop’s research focus for the last 20 years has been on DNA repair and DNA damage response. For this he has used a variety of model systems, including in vivo mouse models and tissue culture systems. DNA damage response and repair is central to normal development and when aberrant, developmental defects, aging phenotypes and cancer ensue. His work reflects these various aspects of DNA damage response and DNA repair biology, often taking what might be termed a systems biology approach. In general he has applied the knowledge they have gained to understand how these processes relate to cancer development and treatment. For example, they recently elucidated the chemosensitivity observed for Ewing sarcoma is due to protein interactions of the fusion oncogene EWS-FLI1 interfering with the normal biology of EWSR1, resulting in BRCA1 being trapped in a transcription complex and unavailable to promote DNA repair. These findings are a paradigm shift in their understanding of a disease that has largely been studied to understand how the EWS-FLI1 gene expression program drives the etiology of this cancer. This work was recently accepted for publication in Nature. They have also recently published a paper delineating how the NRF2 pathway response to alkylation damage to protect again unfolded protein response, again building on our systems biology approaches. Follow up work demonstrated that alkylation damage induces an inflammatory response, particularly in triple negative breast cancers, which promotes cell migration. This response is dependent upon ERK/MAPK pathway and can be blocked with appropriate inhibitors during chemotherapy treatment in preclinical mouse models. Dr. Bishop has a particular interest in the ATM/p53/BRCA1 and NRF2 damage response pathways and how they relate to control of DNA replication, homologous recombination and cancers. So far they have published on ATM, ATR, p53, p21, GADD45a, BRCA1, Ku80, WRN, BLM and PARP1 and the requirement for these genes in homologous recombination in vivo. They have also examined the impact of benzo(a)pyrene, X-rays, cisplatin, MMS, EMS, etoposide, camptothecin, PARP1 inhibitor and hydroxyurea, sometimes in the context of these genetic backgrounds.

 


Moderator
Educational Session
"Exposures Throughout the Lifecourse - New Data on the Environment, Hormones, and Alcohol"

Melissa L. Bondy, PhD
Professor and Associate Director
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Melissa Bondy, Associate Director for Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences, Professor and Section Head, Epidemiology and Populations in the Department of Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, McNair Medical Institute Scholar, and Susan G. Komen Scholar. She is an established cancer epidemiologist with a multi-disciplinary focus on translational research. Her research focus integrates the field of epidemiology with the lab and clinic. She is at the forefront of developing innovative ways to assess the roles of heredity and genetic susceptibility in the etiology of cancer, primarily brain and breast cancer. Dr. Bondy is an international leader in glioma epidemiology. As PI of the Gliogene Consortium (Gliogene Family Study and Glioma International Case-Control Study – GICC), she has led largest multi-national familial glioma study and largest glioma case-control study. The goal of this research has been to better understand the etiology of familial and sporadic glioma. Dr. Bondy is also the contact PI for an on-going research in breast cancer to study molecular predictors of survival after treatment for breast cancer.


Speaker
Educational Session
"Methods to minimize the false negative rate of sentinel lymph node surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for node positive breast cancer"

Judy C. Boughey, MD
Professor of Surgery and Vice Chair of Research
Mayo Clinic

Judy C. Boughey, MD, is a Professor of Surgery at the Mayo Clinic, and is the vice chair for research and medical director of the Clinical Research Office in the Department of Surgery. She is the program director for the Multidisciplinary Breast Surgery Fellowship at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Boughey attended the University of Cambridge where she earned B.A. and M.A. degrees in physiology and her medical M.B., B.Chir degree. She completed general surgery residency at Palmetto Health Richland Memorial Hospital at the University of South Carolina and fellowship in breast surgical oncology at University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

Dr. Boughey's clinical practice is focused on the surgical care of breast disease and she primarily treats patients with breast cancer. She is involved with many breast cancer research projects, including studies on prophylactic mastectomy, sentinel lymph node surgery, neoadjuvant chemotherapy and minimizing axillary surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Dr. Boughey is a passionate researcher and has led multiple national clinical trials funded by National Cancer Institute; ACOSOG Z1071 evaluating SLN surgery in patients with node positive breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, ACOSOG Z11102 evaluating breast conservation in women with multiple ipsilateral breast tumors and ALLIANCE A11202 comparing axillary dissection to axillary radiation for patients with node positive disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The primary endpoint of the Z1071 trial was presented as an oral presentation at SABCS in 2012. The findings from Z1071, along with other clinical trials, and subsequent analyses of data from Z1071, has changed the clinical management of patients with node positive breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

Dr. Boughey is author of over 220 peer-reviewed papers as well as 16 book chapters and regularly presents at national meetings. Her work has been published in peer-reviewed journals such as Annals of Surgery, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Journal of the American Medical Association, Annals of Surgical Oncology, The American Journal of Surgery, Breast Journal, Oncologist, and Cancer. She was an author on SESAP 14 and SESAP 15 and BESAP. Dr. Boughey sat on the Breast Oncology Local Disease (BOLD) Task Force of the NCI Breast Cancer Steering Committee (BCSC) from 2012 to 2016. She was on the Breast Working Group of the SSO from 2012-2014 and on the Breast Oncology Program Directors committee from 2010 onwards. She is chair of the Publications Committee for the American Society of Breast Surgeons and was program chair of the 2016 ASBrS annual meeting. She is chair of the Education Committee for the American College of Surgeons Clinical Research Program and on the program committee of ASCO. She is associate section editor of Annals of Surgical Oncology and on the editorial board of Surgery. She is Pl of the U10 LAPS grant for cooperative group clinical trials at Mayo.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Oxidative stress responses in cancer"

Joan S. Brugge, PhD
Director of Ludwig Cancer Center at Harvard
Harvard Medical School

Dr. Brugge is currently Director of the Ludwig Center at Harvard Medical School. She joined the faculty of the Harvard Medical School as a Professor in July 1997. A graduate of Northwestern University, she did her graduate work at the Baylor College of Medicine, completing her PhD in 1975. She then performed her postdoctoral  training at the University of Colorado with Dr. Raymond Erikson. Dr. Brugge has held full professorships at the State University of New York, Stony Brook, and the University of Pennsylvania, where she was also named as an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. From 1992-1997 Dr. Brugge was Scientific Director of the biotechnology company ARIAD. She then joined the faculty at Harvard in 1997 as Professor of Cell Biology, and was Chair of Cell Biology from 2004 to 2014. Dr. Brugge has received several awards recognizing her scientific accomplishments including an NIH Merit Award, an American Cancer Society Research Professorship and the Senior Career Recognition Award from the American Society of Cell Biology, and she has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. 



Speaker
Educational Session
 "Indications for radiation treatments after neoadjuvant chemotherapy while awaiting the results of clinical trials"

Thomas A. Buchholz, MD
Medical Director
Scripps Health

Thomas A. Buchholz, MD, is the Oncology Medical Director for Scripps Health in San Diego, CA. He is a Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology and holds the Hubert L. Olive Stringer Distinguished Endowed Chair. Dr. Buchholz received his bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Bucknell University in 1984. In 1988, he earned his medical degree from Tufts University School of Medicine, where he won the Hewlett Packard Top Medical Graduate Award. He completed his radiation oncology residency and radiobiology research fellowship at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. After completing his training, Dr. Buchholz joined the radiation oncology staff at Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland Air Force Base as an active duty physician. He came to MD Anderson in 1997 as an assistant professor in Radiation Oncology, was promoted to associate professor with tenure in 2000 and to professor in 2004. He subsequently held leadership positions as Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology, Head of the Division of Radiation Oncology, and served as the institution’s provost and executive vice-president for an ad-interim period.  

Dr. Buchholz’s academic pursuits focus on clinical and translational research in breast cancer and radiation oncology. His research efforts have resulted in more than 350 peer-reviewed original research articles, editorials and book chapters. He serves on numerous national leadership positions including co-chairing the Breast Cancer Steering Committee of the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Buchholz has been widely recognized for his contributions to cancer care. His honors include being listed in Best Doctors in America by Best Doctors, Inc. (2002-2013); Top Doctors in America/America's Top Doctors by Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. (2002-2013); and Consumers' Checkbook's Top Doctor by Doximity (2011). He is a fellow in the American College of Radiology (2008) and was elected fellow of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology in 2012.



Presenter
Debate

Harold J. Burstein, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Harold J. Burstein, MD, PhD is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and a medical oncologist at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham & Women's Hospital. Dr. Burstein attended Harvard College, and earned his MD at Harvard Medical School where he also earned a PhD in immunology.  He additionally has a master's degree in history of science from Harvard. He trained in internal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital and in medical oncology at Dana-Farber. 

His clinical research interests include novel treatments for early- and advanced-stage breast cancer, and studies of quality of life and health behavior among women with breast cancer.  Dr. Burstein has written widely on breast cancer in both traditional medical journals and on the web.  Representative publications can be found in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of Clinical Oncology, and other leading medical journals.  He serves on international breast cancer committees including the NCCN Breast Cancer Panel, The St. Gallen Breast Cancer Panel, and the Alliance Breast Cancer Committee, and chairs the ASCO guidelines on endocrine therapy for breast cancer.  Dr. Burstein an Associate Editor for Cancer Education at the Journal of Clinical Oncology.  



Moderator
General Session 6

Fatima Cardoso, MD
Director Breast Unit
Champalimaud Clinical Centre

Dr Cardoso is the Director of the Breast Unit of the Champalimaud Clinical Center in Lisbon, Portugal. She earned her medical degree at the University of Porto in Portugal and completed fellowships in the Translational Research Unit of the Jules Bordet Institute (IJB) in Brussels, Belgium, and the Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. She then worked for 10 years as Assistant Professor at the Medical Oncology Clinic of the IJB where, besides her clinical work, she was active in the Translational Research Unit and was responsible for phase II-III trials in breast cancer. She is board certified in medical oncology and internal medicine. 

Dr Cardoso’s research interests include biology of breast cancer, prognostic and predictive markers of response to systemic therapy, and new anticancer agents. She is actively involved in a number of phase I-III breast cancer clinical trials and served as the scientific director of the international research network TRANSBIG for 7 years (EU Framework VI). Dr Cardoso is actively involved in numerous professional organizations such as ESMO, EORTC, ASCO, and AACR where she serves on several committees; she is a member of ESMO Board of Directors and Chair of the ESMO National Representatives Committee, member of the ESMO Public Policy Steering Committee and ESMO Guidelines Steering Committee, chair of the EORTC-Breast Cancer Group, member of the ASCO International Affairs Committee and ASCO Breast Cancer Guideline Advisory Group. She is also the Breast Cancer Program Coordinator of the European School of Oncology and chair of the Advanced Breast Cancer International Consensus Guidelines Conference (ABC) and of the ABC Global Alliance. 

Dr Cardoso is editor-in-chief of The Breast Journal, associate editor of the European Journal of Cancer, and an editorial board member of several other journals. She has received several educational and research grants from the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, the European Society of Medical Oncology, the European Cancer Organization, the Portuguese Science and Technology Foundation, the Portuguese League Against Cancer, the Portuguese Ministry of Health, the Free University of Brussels, the "Fonds Jean-Claude Heuson", the Fondation Lambeau-Marteau, the Belgian Federation Against Cancer, the Susan G. Komen Foundation, and the European Union Framework VI Programme. She was awarded the prestigious Order of Santiago da Espada for Scientific Merit, from the President of Portugal, on June 10th 2015. Dr Cardoso has authored over 250 publications and has presented her work nationally and internationally.



Speaker
Translational Science Forum
"The complexity of targeting PI3K for cancer therapy"

Lewis C. Cantley, PhD
Meyer Director 
The Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center

Lewis Cantley, PhD, has made significant advances in cancer research stemming from his discovery of the signaling pathway phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) in 1984. A graduate of West Virginia Wesleyan College (BS, Chemistry, 1971) and Cornell University (PhD, Biophysical Chemistry, 1975), Dr. Cantley has been a professor at Tufts University and Harvard University. He served director of the Beth Israel Deaconess Cancer Center and is currently the Meyer Director of the Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center at Weill Cornell Medicine. 

The author of more than 400 papers and 50 book chapters, Dr. Cantley has received several prestigious accolades, including membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, and the European life sciences academy EMBO. 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Early HER2-positive breast cancer: Doing more and less"

Lisa A. Carey, MD
Chief, Division of Hematology/Oncology
University of North Carolina
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center

Dr. Carey joined the UNC faculty and Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center in 1998. Currently she is the Chief of the Division of Hematology and Oncology and Physician-in-Chief of the North Carolina Cancer Hospital. In addition, she has a role at Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center as the Associate Director for Clinical Sciences. 

Dr. Carey has a longstanding research interest in the clinical application of laboratory findings in breast cancer, with a particular interest in the clinical implications of different molecular subtypes of breast cancer. She designs and leads clinical trials of novel drugs and approaches, and is close collaborator with several laboratory investigators and epidemiologists. Dr. Carey has served in many roles for the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the NCI. She was awarded the Doris Duke Clinician Scientist Award in 1999, a Career Development Award from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in 2000, was inducted into the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars in 2008, was awarded the NCI Director's Service Award in 2011, and was named co-chair of the Alliance National Cooperate Group Breast Committee in 2016. Dr. Carey was honored to become a member of the Komen Scientific Advisory Board as of April  2018.



Speaker

Educational Session
"Microsurgical treatment of lymphedema"

David W. Chang, MD, FACS
Chief of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
University of Chicago Medicine

Dr. Chang is a Professor in the Department of Surgery and the Chief of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the University of Chicago. He is also the Director of Microsurgery Fellowship at the University of Chicago. He is currently the past President of the American Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery and the President-elect of the World Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery.

He has dedicated over 20 years in the field of reconstructive surgery for cancer patients, and has developed an international reputation as a leader, a pioneer and an innovator in our field, especially in the areas of breast reconstruction and microsurgical treatment of lymphedema. From 1998 to 2013, Dr. Chang was at the MD Anderson Cancer Center where he served on numerous leadership roles including the Deputy Chairman for the Department of Plastic Surgery, the Director of the Plastic Surgery Clinic, and the Director of the Center for Microsurgery Research and Training.

Dr. Chang has published over 150 peer-reviewed research articles and numerous book chapters. He has coedited a textbook Lymphedema Surgery, which was published in 2015. He has been invited to lecture at more than 200 national and international symposiums and meetings, while serving as a visiting professor at institutions all over the world. He serves on the editorial board of numerous leading medical journals including the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. He was a recipient of the prestigious Godina Traveling Fellowship from the American Society of Reconstructive Microsurgery in 2005. He has been voted as one of the "Best Doctors in America" in his field by his peers since 2001. He is a senior board examiner for American Society of Plastic Surgery and serves on the Board of Directors for American Society of Plastic Surgery.



Speaker

Educational Session
"Triple negative breast cancer: Current and future directions in metastatic patients "

Moderator
Mini-Symposium
"Man vs. Machine: Now and in the Future"

Jenny C. Chang, MD
Director, Houston Methodist Cancer Center
Houston Methodist Hospital

Dr. Jenny C. Chang is a Professor at Weill Cornell Medical School, and Director of Houston Methodist Cancer Center, and holds the Emily Herrman Chair in Cancer Research. She obtained her medical degree at Cambridge University, and fellowship training at the Royal Marsden Hospital/Institute of Cancer Research in the United Kingdom. She is an internationally recognized thought leader in cancer research and clinical care. Through continuous support and funding by multiple organizations including the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute (NIH/NCI), Department of Defense (DOD), and investigator-initiated pharmaceutical research awards, her group is recognized as the first to describe cancer stem cells and the role in resistance to therapy. Through NIH/NCI funding, her group described some of the critical drivers of cancer stem cells, and therapeutic efficacy of targeting these stem cells in preclinical models and clinical trials. Dr. Chang’s recent work is focused on the clinical translation of these targets, and she has obtained two large DOD grants using T cell immunotherapy (>$3 million) and nanoparticles (>$16 million) to conduct clinical trials with these new exciting molecules.



Speaker

Educational Session
"Tumor dormancy and recurrence"

Lewis A. Chodosh, MD, PhD
Professor and Chairman, Department of Cancer Biology
Perelman School of Medicine
University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Chodosh is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Cancer Biology at the University of Pennsylvania, Associate Director for Basic Science at the Abramson Cancer Center, and co-Director of the 2-PREVENT Breast Cancer Translational Center of Excellence.  

Dr. Chodosh received his BS from Yale University in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, his MD from Harvard Medical School, and his PhD in Biochemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under the mentorship of Dr. Phillip Sharp.  Dr. Chodosh completed a residency in Internal Medicine and a clinical fellowship in Endocrinology at the Massachusetts General Hospital and went on to study breast cancer genetics as a postdoctoral fellow with Dr. Philip Leder at Harvard Medical School.

Research in the Chodosh laboratory is focused on understanding mechanisms of breast cancer initiation and progression, with a particular emphasis on tumor dormancy and recurrence.  His laboratory has pioneered the generation and analysis of multiple genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer that have been used to identify molecular pathways that underlie breast cancer dormancy, metastasis, and tumor recurrence and to validate these pathways in patient samples.  More recently, through the 2-PREVENT Translational Center of Excellence, Dr. Chodosh is now focused on leveraging these basic discoveries to develop novel clinical trials for breast cancer patients with minimal residual disease.  

Dr. Chodosh has been elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, and the National Academy of Medicine, and he currently serves as Editor-in-Chief of Breast Cancer Research as well as a scientific advisor to the Harvard Nurses’ Health Studies I and II, and to the Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. 



Speaker

Educational Session
"Efficacy and patient selection"

Charlotte Coles, MB ChB, MRCP, FRCR, PhD
Reader in Breast Radiation Oncology
University of Cambridge

Dr Charlotte Coles is a Reader in Breast Radiation Oncology at the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Centre, UK. Her research aims are to provide breast cancer patients with the best chance of cure with least side effects by personalising radiation techniques based on risk of recurrence. She is Chief Investigator of 4 UK clinical trials with linked translational research; randomised trial (RCT) testing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and partial breast radiotherapy in patients at low risk of recurrence; RCT testing dose-escalated IMRT for patients at higher risk of recurrence; post-operative avoidance of radiotherapy in minimal risk women: patient selection using biomarkers; pre-operative breast IMRT in patients receiving neo-adjuvant hormonal treatment.

Dr Coles is also Chair of the UK National Cancer Research Institute Breast Clinical Studies Early Disease Subgroup and Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Oncology journal.



Speaker
Basic Science Forum
"High resolution intravital imaging of the mechanism of how breast cancer initiates and sustains systemic dissemination"

John S. Condeelis, PhD
Judith & Burton P. Resnick Chair in Translational Research
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

John Condeelis is The Judith and Burton P. Resnick Chair in Translational Research, Professor and Co-Chairman of the Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM).  He is the director of the Cancer Center program “Tumor microenvironment and Metastasis” and co-Director of the Gruss Lipper Biophotonics Center of AECOM, a center dedicated to the development and application of optical imaging technologies. He is co-Director of the Integrated Imaging Program which is dedicated to the translation of methods using combined imaging modalities into clinically useful prognostics and treatment endpoints. 

His research interests are in optical physics, cell biology and biophysics, cancer biology and mouse models of cancer. He and his collaborators developed the multiphoton imaging technology and animal models used to identify invasion and intravasation microenvironments in mammary tumors. This led to the discovery of the paracrine interaction between tumor cells and macrophages in vivo, and the role of macrophages in the migration of tumor cells and their dissemination from primary tumors via blood vessels to distant metastatic sites. Based on these results, cell collection techniques were developed for the collection of migrating and disseminating macrophages and tumor cells. This led to the discovery of the mouse and human invasion signatures. 

John Condeelis has devised uncaging, biosensor detection and multiphoton imaging technologies for these studies and has used novel caged-enzymes and biosensors to test, in vivo, the predictions of the invasion signatures regarding the mechanisms of tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. This work has supplied markers for the prediction of breast tumor metastasis in humans. Three of these markers, TMEM, MenaCalc and cofilin x p-cofilin, have been used in retrospective studies of cohorts of breast cancer patients to predict metastatic risk and are now in clinical validation trials. He has authored more than 300 scientific papers on various aspects of cell and cancer biology, biophysics and optical imaging. His current research remains on these topics.



Speaker

Educational Session
"Blockade of estrogen signaling boosts antitumor immunity by inhibiting tumor-induced pathological myelopoiesis"

Jose R. Conejo-Garcia, MD, PhD
Chair, Department of Immunology
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center

Dr. Conejo-Garcia completed his medical degree at the University of Zaragoza, in Spain. After a residency in Clinical Chemistry, he completed his PhD in Molecular Medicine from the University of Alcala, also in Spain, in 1998. He completed post doctorate training in pancreatic cancer at the University of Bern, Switzerland, the following year. He then moved to Germany to lead a project of the discovery and characterization of antimicrobial peptides. In 2001 he joined the ovarian cancer team at the University of Pennsylvania that identified for the first time the role of T cell responses in the outcome of ovarian cancer patients. He then joined the Department of Immunology at Dartmouth College as an independent faculty, before moving back to the Penn Campus to lead the Tumor Microenvironment and Metastasis Program at The Wistar Institute. Dr. Conejo-Garcia joined Moffitt in November 2016 as the chair of the Department of Immunology. He is also co-leader of the Immunology Program at H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center.

Dr. Conejo-Garcia’s research program focuses on understanding and targeting mechanisms governing the balance between immunosuppression and protective immunity in the tumor microenvironment, with an emphasis on the role of cancer-driven pathological myelopoiesis.

By combining translational understanding and clinical specimens with mechanistic studies in mouse models, Dr. Conejo-Garcia has contributed to elucidate many of the mechanisms driving protective immunity against gynecologic cancers that have been unveiled in recent years, as demonstrated by >100 of recent articles that total >9,000 citations in Scopus. Those include manuscripts in The New England Journal of Medicine, Cell, Nature Medicine, Cancer Cell, Immunity and Cancer Discovery. He is the principal investigator of 3 active RO1s on the immunobiology of cancer, and collaborates with other investigators in other funded research projects. Dr. Conejo-Garcia serves as a reviewer on several editorial boards and has completed his tenure as a chartered member of the TTT NIH study section. He has been invited to present or chair sessions at over 30 national and international events including Paris, France; Guangzhou, China; Hannover, Germany; Valencia, Spain; Valdivia, Chile; and Mar del Plata, Argentina.



Speaker

Year in Review
"Metastatic breast cancer"

Roisin M. Connolly, MBBCh, MD
Assistant Professor of Oncology
The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Dr. Roisin Connolly is an Assistant Professor of Oncology in the Breast and Ovarian Cancer Program, and Co-Director of the Developmental Therapeutics Program at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins. Her principal research activities consist of designing and conducting clinical trials that test investigational new drugs in the treatment of breast cancer. She has specific expertise in the use of epigenetic modifiers in breast cancer patients, and in developing both tissue and imaging-based biomarkers of response to breast cancer therapies. She is the Principal Investigator for a number of multicenter trials in collaboration with the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) at the NCI, the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC), and the Eastern Co-operative Oncology Group (ECOG)-ACRIN.

In the field of epigenetics and breast cancer Dr. Connolly has conducted a phase II trial evaluating the safety, efficacy and surrogate biomarkers of response of the novel epigenetic combination of the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-AZA and the histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat in patients with advanced breast cancer. This multicenter CTEP-sponsored trial enrolled 40 patients with metastatic breast cancer, and incorporated the serial collection of tissue and blood samples (Connolly RM et al. CCR 2016). She also recently published the results of a phase II neoadjuvant study incorporating epigenetic therapy with chemotherapy, which has identified promising imaging-based biomarkers of response to neoadjuvant treatment (Connolly RM et al. JNM 2015) and has also developed a phase I study which combines entinostat with immune checkpoint agents, and incorporates serial tumor biopsies to try and assess mechanism of action of these agents in breast cancer patients as well as potential biomarkers of response. Finally, she is Study Chair for a phase Ill international ECOG-ACRIN study (E2112) investigating the HDAC inhibitor entinostat in combination with hormonal therapy in women with metastatic breast cancer. This is a registration trial for entinostat and involves a strong collaboration between industry, the NCI and ECOG-ACRIN. Complete accrual is anticipated in Fall 2018 (600 patients).

Dr. Connolly has specific expertise in designing neoadjuvant clinical trials and with the use of the monocloncal antibodies pertuzumab and trastuzumab and a Principal Investigator for an ongoing multicenter phase II study entitled: "A phase 2 clinical trial assessing the correlation of early changes in standardized uptake value (SUV) on positron emission tomography (PET) with pathological complete response (pCR) to neoadjuvant pertuzumab and trastuzumab in women with primary operable HER2-positive breast cancer." The study is supported by Genentech and the TBCRC. This study aims to identify women with HER2-positive breast cancer who may be spared chemotherapy and its toxic side effects. Accrual is complete and she will present the primary endpoint result at ASCO 2018. She is also Principal Investigator for the pertuzumab and trastuzumab arm of the NCI MATCH trial. This study will enroll patients with solid tumors harboring aberrations in HER2 in order to assess activity in this molecularly selected population. As a clinical investigator with a focus on translational drug development, her goal is to improve outcomes for patients with breast cancer in a research environment.



Speaker

Susan G. Komen® Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction in Basic Science
"Modeling Immune Response: Lessons Learned from Mouse Models of Cancer Development"

Lisa Coussens, PhD
Chair of the Department of Cell, Developmental & Cancer Biology
Oregon Health & Sciences University

Lisa M. Coussens, Ph.D., is being honored for her significant contributions to breast cancer research, which have been essential in advancing our understanding of the role of the tumor microenvironment, particularly immune cells, in cancer development. Her research has established that immune cells can both enhance and inhibit tumor growth and identified critical immune-regulated pathways that can be targeted therapeutically to block or slow cancer development. Dr. Coussens’ work is helping to lay the foundation for development and clinical use of cancer immunotherapies that will significantly impact the future of breast cancer research and treatment. 

Dr. Coussens has made several pivotal discoveries regarding the role of immune cells in cancer development and progression. In a seminal study, she demonstrated that certain immune cells were actually “hijacked” by early tumors to promote breast cancer growth and metastasis. She and her team discovered an intricate cell-cell communication process through which tumor cells trigger T-lymphocytes or T-cells (a type of white blood cell involved in controlling the immune response to foreign substances) to recruit another type of white blood cell called macrophages to early tumors. Normally involved in clearing debris, macrophages around tumor cells produce epidermal growth factor (EGF) that in turns promotes tumor cell proliferation and invasion. This provocative finding expanded our understanding of the tumor microenvironment and sparked additional research aimed at reprogramming these immune cells by designing and then testing targeted and immune- based therapies to prevent them from aiding and abetting the cancer. 

Her research has also led to a better understanding of the role immune cells play in regulating responses to cytotoxic, targeted and immune-based therapies. Dr. Coussens and others have found that dying cancer cells release factors that can induce a CD8+ T-cell mediated immune response against the cancer. However, macrophages and other factors in the tumor microenvironment suppress this response thereby preventing CD8+ T-cells from killing cancer cells. This knowledge is now being leveraged to design new approaches to treating breast and other cancers that will target the immune system, specifically relieving immune suppression and allowing CD8+ T cells to infiltrate and attack cancer cells. 

Dr. Coussens’ more recent work focuses on this strategy of targeting the immune system and relieving CD8+ T cell suppression. In work funded through a Susan G. Komen® Promise Grant, for example, Dr. Coussens and colleagues have conducted a multi-center Phase Ib/II clinical trial evaluating a novel drug that reduces infiltration of macrophages into tumors in combination with chemotherapy in women with metastatic triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). Combining laboratory and clinical research, they are assessing the best therapeutic combinations to block cancer-surrounding macrophages from infiltrating tumors and render cancer cells more sensitive to chemotherapy. They are also testing for biomarkers that would allow clinicians to tailor treatment approaches for TNBC patients and evaluate their response to treatment over time, with the goal of avoiding potential resistance to therapy and ultimately minimizing metastases. 

Dr. Coussens started her career at San Francisco-based Genentech, Inc., where she cloned the HER2 proto-oncogene. She earned her Ph.D. at the University of California, Los Angeles and completed postdoctoral training in cancer biology at the University of California, San Francisco where she then established her laboratory that revealed these important immune- based paradigms. She moved to Oregon Health & Sciences University (OHSU) in 2012, where she is the Chair of the Department of Cell, Developmental & Cancer Biology, and Associate Director for Basic Research in the Knight Cancer Institute at OHSU and holds the Hildegard Lamfrom Endowed Chair in Basic Science. 

Dr. Coussens’ pioneering research has shed light on the complex interplay between tumors and immune cells. Fueled by a personal encounter with breast cancer (her mother, now 88 years of age, was diagnosed with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer in the 1990s), Dr. Coussens’ drive for innovation and continuous focus on translating her laboratory findings to the clinic have provided critical insights into cancer biology and paved the way for development of new approaches to treat breast cancer. Her work will have a lasting impact for years to come.



Moderator

Educational Session
"Partial Breast Irradiation - Where Does It Stand?"

Moderator
General Session 4

Richard L. Crownover, MD, PhD
Professor of Radiation Oncology
UT Health San Antonio

Dr. Crownover obtained both his PhD in Physics and MD at Duke University in Durham North Carolina. He trained in Radiation Oncology at the University of California San Francisco. He joined the Cleveland Clinic in 1995 where he served as the Chief of the Breast and Musculoskeletal tumor services in Radiation Oncology, and also as the Director of the CyberKnife program when the CyberKnife was still under investigational device exemption. During a decade at the Cleveland Clinic he was a key player in the creation and successful growth of the multidisciplinary breast center. He was a member of the Cleveland Clinic’s system-wide Breast Cancer Quality Improvement Team. In 2005 he became the inaugural Director of the Reading Hospital and Medical Center’s newly opened Regional Cancer Center in Reading Pennsylvania. Dr. Crownover joined the Cancer Therapy and Research Center (CTRC) in 2007 where his clinical emphasis has been on treatment of breast cancer and development of a stereotactic body radiotherapy program. The CTRC subsequently became part of the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio is now known as the Mays Cancer Center at UT Health San Antonio. He is a Professor of Radiation Oncology and Director of the Radiation Oncology Residency Program. Dr. Crownover is Co-Leader of Breast Multi-Disciplinary Care Team.

Working with industry on the development of cutting edge radiotherapy treatment platforms has been a career-long interest. He is currently exploring the use of Surface Image Guidance for treatment for treatment of breast tumors and other disease sites including sarcomas and pediatric tumors. He is an active participant in local and multi-institutional breast clinical trials. He is and has been a member of the RTOG Breast Committee. Other areas of research have included early applications of high-dose-rate brachytherapy for sarcomas and stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung, liver, and spinal tumors.

Dr. Crownover has been named one of “The Best Doctors for Women” by Ladies Home Journal and one of “America’s Top Doctors” by Redbook. In 2017 he received the “President’s Clinical Excellence Award” at the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio.



Moderator
General Session 5

Giuseppe Curigliano, MD, PhD
Director Division of Early Drug Development
University of Milano
European Institute of Oncology

Giuseppe Curigliano, MD, PhD is an Associate Professor of Medicine at University of Milano, and a medical oncologist at the European Institute of Oncology in Milano. Dr. Curigliano earned his MD at Catholic University of Rome and he completed a PhD program in Clinical Pharmacology at University of Pisa.  He has a master's degree in Public Health from Catholic University of Milano. He completed his postdoctoral fellowship in South Carolina Medical School, Charleston, working on translational immunology in solid tumors. He moved to the Comprehensive Cancer Center at Columbia University in New York City, working in the field of molecular biology of cancer. He trained in internal medicine at Policlinico Gemelli in Rome and in medical oncology at the European Institute of Oncology. He is a clinician and researcher specializing in early drug development with a special commitment for patients with breast cancer.  Dr. Curigliano has served in many roles for the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) and the European School of Oncology (ESO). He serves in the scientific advisory committee of the International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) and the Breast International Group (BIG) Immune Task Force.  He serves on international breast cancer committees including the IMPAKT meeting scientific committee, the St. Gallen Breast Cancer Panel, the ABC/ESMO Guidelines Committee, the ESMO Breast scientific committee. He has contributed to over 300 peer-reviewed publications. He serves as Co-Editor in Chief of The Breast, Associate Editor of European Journal of Cancer, and editor for Cancer Treatment Reviews, Journal of Clinical Oncology and Annals of Oncology. He has been awarded with the Umberto Veronesi Award in Vienna in 2017 and with the Fellowship of the European Academy of Cancer Sciences in Paris in 2017.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 1 Developmental Therapeutics

E. Claire Dees, MD
Professor of Medicine 
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center 



Discussant
Spotlight Session 4 Breast Cancer Screening and Imaging

Farrokh Dehdashti, MD
Professor of Radiology 
Washington University School of Medicine

Dr. Dehdashti is a board certified in nuclear medicine and Professor of Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University in St. Louis.  She is the Vice Chair and Director of the Division of Nuclear Medicine and the PET Medical Director of the Center for Clinical Imaging Research (CCIR), a center for PET/MR and PET/CT research imaging. She is also the Co-Leader of Oncologic Imaging Program of the Siteman Cancer Center (SCC). This program’s main focus is in translational research studies in all fields of imaging. She has been involved in translational PET research for over 25 years and her research has focused in translational oncologic studies with emphasis on receptor imaging, especially in breast cancer. She has designed and executed the first human use of a variety of novel radiotracers developed at Washington University and industry.  Currently, she holds Investigational New Drug (IND) applications for several radiotracers, Cu-ATSM; N-(4-(6,7-dimethoxy-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1H)-yl)butyl)-2-(2-[18F]-fluoroethoxy)-5-methylbenzamide ([18F]3c), also called [18F]ISO-1, a proliferative tracer; 21-[18F]Fluoro-16α,17 α-[(R)-1’-α-furylmethylidene)dioxy]-19-norpregn-4-ene-3,20 dione (FFNP), a progesterone-receptor imaging agent, 89Zr-trastuzumab, a HER2 imaging agent and 16α-18F-fluoro-17β-estradiol (FES), an estrogen-receptor imaging agent, and 64Cu-LLP2A, VLA-4-targeted imaging tracer.  She has vast expertize in image analysis of novel radiotracers and have served as imaging expert for imaging study design and PET image analysis in many trials.  Her current projects includes studies for assessment of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer by PET, evaluation of CCR2-based PET imaging agent in pancreatic cancer and assessment of multiple myeloma by PET using VLA-4-targeted imaging tracer.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Optimizing treatment of early stage triple negative breast cancer: Clinical challenges and new scientific horizons"

Angela DeMichele, MD, MSCE
Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology
Abramson Cancer Center
University of Pennsylvania

Dr. DeMichele is a Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania and holds the Jill and Alan Miller Endowed Professorship in Breast Cancer Excellence. Dr. DeMichele has been the Co-Leader of the Breast Cancer Research Program in the Abramson Cancer Center since 2005, where she also directs both the Breast Cancer Clinical Research Unit and the Breast Cancer TRACR Biobank.  She has a dual appointment as a Senior Scholar in the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, where she developed a graduate course on clinical trials and translational research and serves as thesis advisor to Masters and PhD candidates.

Her research program is focused on drug development, innovative clinical trial design and investigation of biomarkers for precision therapy.  As Co-Director of the 2-PREVENT Breast Cancer Translational Center of Excellence, she leads a multidisciplinary team to tackle the problem of breast cancer recurrence through novel clinical trials targeting disseminated and circulating tumor cells.  She has developed numerous targeted therapies, including phase I and II development of the CDK4/6 inhibitor, Palbociclib and is currently co-PI of the international PALLAS adjuvant trial and PATINA trial for Her2+ disease. In addition, she serves as Co-Chair of the Breast Committee of the ECOG/ACRIN Cooperative Group, Trial Operations Chair of the I-SPY2 multicenter, neoadjuvant trial, and Penn site PI for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium.  

She has authored over 150 publications in high impact journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine and Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), and her research is has been funded by the NIH, NCI, DOD, Komen Foundation, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Cancer Society and other philanthropic sources. She is an Associate Editor at Breast Cancer Research. 

She has chaired the Metastatic Breast Cancer Scientific Program and Breast Cancer and Clinical Trials Education Committees of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and serves on the ASCO Guidelines Advisory Committee in addition to serving on other ASCO committees, and on the American Board of Internal Medicine Oncology Subspecialty Board. 


Discussant
Spotlight Session 7 Biology of Invasive Lobular and Endocrine Resistant Breast Cancer

Christine Desmedt, PhD
Head, Laboratory for Translational Breast Cancer Research
KU Leuven

Dr. Christine Desmedt received her bio-engineer degree in Cells and Genes Biotechnology from the KU Leuven in 2000. She then immediately started working at the Jules Bordet Institute, Brussels, an autonomous comprehensive cancer center devoted entirely to the fight against cancer. For two years she worked as a clinical monitor for the Breast European Adjuvant Studies Group (Br.E.A.S.T), coordinating the monitoring activities of external groups for the conduct of breast cancer trials. This experience gave her the necessary clinical background for carrying optimal translational breast cancer research.   

In 2003, she joined the Breast Cancer Translational Research Laboratory of this Institute, headed by Prof. Christos Sotiriou, where she started a PhD entitled “Multimarker approach for improving breast cancer treatment tailoring” with Prof. Martine Piccart as co-promoter. In 2004, Dr. Desmedt earned a master in bio-medical sciences at the Université Libre de Bruxelle (U.L.B.) and defended successfully her PhD in 2008. Since then she is acting as the Translational Research Coordinator of the lab, conducting research projects and assisting the head of the lab in the scientific and administrative management of the lab. From October 2010 till April 2011, she was a visiting scientist at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, UK, under the supervision of Dr. P. Campbell in the Cancer Genome Project lab. 

On the 1st of October 2018, she was appointed as Assistant Professor and head of the Laborator for Translational Breast Cancer Research in the Oncology Department of the KU Leuven (Leuven, Belgium).  



Moderator

General Session 3

Angelo Di Leo, MD, PhD
Head "Sandro Pitigliani" Medical Oncology Department
Hospital of Prato
Instituto Toscano Tumori

Angelo Di Leo is currently Head of the Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Unit and Chair of the Department of Oncology at the Hospital of Prato, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Italy, a position he took up in September 2003. After graduating in medicine and surgery at the University of Palermo, Italy in 1988, he received his postgraduate diploma in medical oncology from the University of Pavia, Italy in 1992, and in 1996 received his European certification in medical oncology. 

Dr Di Leo trained at the National Cancer Institute in Milan, Italy, where he worked for 7 years until 1996. From 1996 to 2003, he worked at the Chemotherapy Unit of the Jules Bordet Institute in Brussels, Belgium, where in 1997 he was appointed senior staff member and medical director of the Breast European Adjuvant Studies Team. 

Dr Di Leo’s main research interest is breast cancer, and he has coordinated a number of international, pivotal phase III trials in new adjuvant therapies. He is also heavily involved in the evaluation of molecular markers with potential predictive value for breast cancer. The author of many peer-reviewed articles, Dr Di Leo has lectured extensively at national and international meetings. He is a member of the Early Breast Cancer Trialists’ Cooperative Group steering committee, the Breast International Group Executive Board, and chair of the Biological Protocol Working Group (BPWG) - IBCSG. He has also served on the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) grants selection committee (2006–2009), the ASCO Education Committee (2012–2014), and the Scientific Advisory Council of the Susan G. Komen for the Cure® (2010-2016).



Speaker

Educational Session
"Clinical and molecular profiles to identify who is at risk?"

Mitchell Dowsett, PhD
Head of Department
Ralph Lauren Centre for Breast Cancer Research

Prof. Dowsett has published close to 600 papers on breast cancer, predominantly involving ER+ disease and/or biomarker analyses and has conducted multiple studies and co-authored several publications that consider the clinical and molecular features of ER+ breast cancers that are associated with risk of late recurrence.  Mostly these have been based on data drawn from the ATAC trial.  Particularly notable are:  a recent publication on CTS5, a new instrument for integrating key clinical features for predicting risk of late recurrence (JCO, 2018); and a comprehensive comparison of gene expression signatures for the same purpose (JAMA Oncol, 2017).



Speaker

Clinical Science Forum
"Moderate penetrance mutations: What to do?"

Susan M. Domchek, MD
Executive Director, Basser Center for BRCA
University of Pennsylvania

Susan M. Domchek, MD is the Sasser Professor in Oncology at the Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania. She serves as Executive Director of the Sasser Center for BRCA at the Abramson Cancer Center and Director of the Mariann and Robert MacDonald Cancer Risk Evaluation Program.

Her work focuses on the genetic evaluation and medical management of individuals with inherited risk factors for cancer. Dr. Domchek is particularly interested in developing new cancer therapies, such as PARP inhibitors, for breast cancer patients due to genetic risk factors. An elected member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation, Dr. Domchek is also a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology for which she had served on a number of committees. A significant contributor to the oncology literature, she has authored/co-authored more than 250 articles appearing in scholarly journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Association and the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Dr. Domchek also serves on a number of editorial review boards, including the Journal of Clinical Oncology, as well as on the Scientific Advisory Board for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.



Speaker

Basic Science Forum
"Neutrophil extracellular traps promote breast cancer metastasis"

Mikala Egeblad, PhD
Associate Professor
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL)

Mikala Egeblad, PhD is Associate Professor and co-program leader at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Cancer Center. She obtained degrees in Medicine (BS 1993) and Human Biology (MSc., 1996) from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Under the mentorship of Dr. Marja Jäättelä at The Danish Cancer Society, she received her PhD in cancer biology (2000), also from the University of Copenhagen. In Dr. Marja Jäättelä’s lab, she worked on receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and apoptosis in breast cancer. Dr. Egeblad did her postdoctoral training with Dr. Zena Werb at the University of California, San Francisco. There, she began employing mouse models to understand how the microenvironment influences tumor progression, focusing on innate immune cells and protease-mediated extracellular matrix remodeling. With Zena Werb and another postdoctoral fellow, Dr. Andrew Ewald, she also developed methods for using spinning disk confocal microscopy to image tumor-stroma interactions in breast cancer.

She started her independent career at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in 2009. Her awards include the Era of Hope Scholar Award (2014) from the Department of Defense, Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs; a Career Catalyst Grant from Susan G. Komen for the Cure (2010); and the Pershing Square Sohn Prize for Young Investigators in Cancer Research (2017). Her current work is focused on the role of neutrophils and matrix remodeling in metastatic spread of breast and pancreatic cancer.



Moderator

Educational Session
"Late Recurrence in ER Positive Breast Cancer: Therapeutic Interventions and Biological Insights"

Chair
Spotlight Session
"Spotlight Session 1 Developmental Therapeutics"

Matthew James Ellis, MD, PhD
Director
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Matthew James Ellis a physician scientist who completed his training at the University of London (PhD) and the University of Cambridge (MB BChir). He is currently the Director for the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine where he coordinates an interdisciplinary team of oncologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, basic scientists and statisticians focused on improving our ability to prevent, detect and treat breast cancer. In addition, he is the Associate Director for Translational Research at the Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, with a broad role in promoting translational research. His research has focuses on estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. He has championed neoadjuvant endocrine therapy as a non-toxic alternative to chemotherapy for promoting breast-conserving therapy in postmenopausal women with ER+ HER2- stage 2 and 3 disease (Journal of Clinical Oncology 2001). He developed the Ki67 proliferation marker-based Preoperative Endocrine Prognostic Index (Journal of Clinical Oncology 2017) that is now undergoing a large validation study (the ALTERNATE study). These clinical studies have provided the context and tumor specimens for seminal investigations into the ER+ breast cancer somatic genome, with insights into clonal heterogeneity (Nature Communications 2015), new tumor suppressor gene discovery specific to ER+ disease and new therapeutic targets (Nature 2012). These include activating mutations in the HER2 gene that have been shown respond to HER2 kinase inhibition in clinical trials, particularly metastatic lobular carcinoma (Cancer Discovery 2013, Clinical Cancer Research 2017). He also is a pioneer of patient-derived xenograft research (PDX). A PDX study in triple negative breast cancer revealed clonal remodeling during brain metastasis (Nature 2010). PDX analysis also revealed acquired resistance to endocrine therapy is a consequence of ESR1 ligand-binding mutation; ESR1 amplification and most uniquely chromosomal translocation causing fusions between the N terminus of ESR1 and the C-terminus of genes that can confer constitutive transcriptional activity (Cell Reports 2013). To improve our ability to understand the complex genomic changes he has been working with the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium at the US National Cancer Institute to develop proteogenomic analysis of breast cancer. This mass spectrometry-based approach recently elucidated the functional consequences of somatic mutations, narrowed candidate nominations for driver genes within large deletions and amplified regions and identified therapeutic targets (Nature 2016, Nature Communications 2017). His work has been cited over 30,000 times (Google Scholar). Laboratory web page https://www.bcm.edu/research/labs/matthew-ellis



Speaker

Clinical Science Forum
"Polygenic risk scores for breast cancer: Ready or not?"

D. Gareth Evans, FRCP, MD, MBBS
Professor of Medical Genetics and Cancer Epidemiology
University of Manchester

Dr. Matthew Professor Evans has established a national and international reputation in clinical and research aspects of cancer genetics, particularly in neurofibromatosis and breast cancer. He has published 707 peer reviewed research publications; 261 as first or senior author.

He has published over 100 reviews and chapters and has had a book published by Oxford University Press on familial cancer. He has an ISI web of knowledge H-index of 95 and google scholar of 129 having only published his first article in 1990. In the last 7 years he has raised over £45 million in grants for multicentre and local studies – approximately £38 million to Manchester. He is Chief Investigator on two NIHR program grants (2009-2014-£1.59 million) (2017-2020-£1million) on breast cancer risk prediction and also has an NIHR RfPB grant as CI (2011). He as supervised 13 successful doctoral theses and is currently supervising five. He has led a successful bid for a nationally funded NF2 service (£7.5 million pa) that started in 2010 and is involved in the national complex NF1 service. He is overall cancer lead (3 themes) and Cancer Prevention Early detection theme lead on the successful all Manchester NIHR Biomedical research centre bid (2017-2022-£28.5million). He is lead clinician on the NICE familial breast cancer guideline group and until recently a trustee of Breast Cancer Now and the Neuro Foundation. He is on the editorial board of JNCI and is a board member of the Science Strategy Committee of Breast Cancer Now.



Speaker

Educational Session
"The EMT and metastasis controversy: Where things stand in 2018"

Heide L. Ford, PhD
Professor, Department of Pharmacology
University of Colorado School of Medicine

Dr. Heide Ford is a Tenured Professor in the Department of Pharmacology at The University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, and holds the David F. and Margaret Turley Grohne Chair in Basic/Translational Cancer Research. She received an undergraduate degree in Biology, with a minor in Chemistry, from the State University of New York at Geneseo, and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Biochemistry from the University of Rochester, both in upstate New York. After completing her postdoctoral fellowship under the mentorship of Arthur Pardee at The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School in Boston, Dr. Ford joined the University of Colorado School of Medicine in 2001.

Since then, she has been running a funded laboratory that focuses on the role of developmental regulators, particularly the Six1/Eya transcriptional complex, in breast tumorigenesis and metastasis. Her work spans diverse areas, from understanding the parallels between normal development and tumorigenesis, to basic molecular pathways that contribute to metastasis, to the more translational aspects of developing novel therapeutics for cancer therapy.

To date, she has published more than 70 peer reviewed primary research articles and reviews, the vast majority related to metastasis, and many which focus on the epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and its role in metastasis. Dr. Ford currently serves as the Chair of the Tumor Progression and Metastasis Study Section of The National Cancer Institute, and also serves as a senior editor for Molecular Cancer Research and Breast Cancer Research. In addition, she served as Chair of the Gordon Conference in Mammary Gland Biology in 2017 (along with Mike Lewis), and thus is involved in national and international leadership positions. Dr. Ford has mentored numerous undergraduate and graduate students, as well postdoctoral fellows, and recently stepped down as the Director of The Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program at The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. She received The Dean’s Mentoring Award in 2010, and the Pharmacology Excellence in Teaching/Mentoring award in 2013 and 2016, and thus is dedicated to developing the careers of young scientists. Most recently, she has taken a position as the Associate Director of Basic Research in the University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center.



Speaker
Mini-Symposium
"Missed opportunities – The perils of under-treatment"

Rachel A. Freedman, MD, MPH
Medical Director, Dana-Farber Cancer Care Collaborative
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Rachel Freedman is a medical oncologist specializing in breast cancer at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Medical Director of the Dana-Farber Cancer Care Collaborative. Her research primarily focuses on the care of vulnerable patients populations who are not well represented in clinical trials to date and who suffer from worse outcomes once they are diagnosed with breast cancer. Her research has included large scale database and registry-based studies, qualitative work, survey studies, and interventions targeted towards improving the evidence base and outcomes for women at risk for poor outcomes. She is the Principal Investigator on multiple therapeutic trials which are dedicated to older patients with breast cancer, including the Adjuvant T-DM1 for Older Patients study (ATOP) and an adjuvant chemotherapy trial funded by the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology. 

She is the recipient of multiple awards to support her work, including a Mentored Research Scholar Award from the American Cancer Society, two consecutive Career Catalyst Awards from Susan G. Komen, a Gateway for Cancer Research award, and grants from the Alliance NCORP Research Base grant and National Cancer Institute. She serves on the Alliance Committee for Older Adults with Cancer, the ASCO meeting program committee, and the Cancer and Aging Research Group. She is also a founding member of the Boston Breast Cancer Equity Coalition, a city-wide collaboration aimed to eliminate racial disparities in breast cancer outcomes in Boston and is the site PI for a related U01 grant, ‘Translating Research Into Practice.’  



Speaker
Workshop
"Novel targets in breast cancer: How to go about drugging them?"

Lori S. Friedman, PhD
Senior Director, Translational Oncology
Genentech, Inc.

Lori Friedman was trained in Molecular and Cell Biology, earning her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, and completing postdoctoral research at Cambridge University, UK with a focus on inherited breast cancer.  

At the biotech company Exelixis, Inc. Lori's research focused on target discovery and validation, and she advanced to become the Director of the Signal Transduction Research department.  In 2004 Lori joined Genentech where she continued to focus on targeting key cancer pathways.  She is Senior Director of the Translational Oncology department at Genentech, whose research includes validation of new oncology targets, understanding mechanism of action and mechanism of resistance of new potential therapeutics, in vitro and in vivo pharmacology, and using preclinical cancer models to predict which patients will benefit from new agents. Lori's lab is investigating the differential regulation of the mutant PI3K oncoprotein. 

She served as co-chair of the "New Drugs on the Horizon" symposium at the AACR annual conferences in 2010-2016,  Lead Organizer of Keystone Symposium on PI3K in 2015, served on the Scientific Committee of the AACR-NCI-EORTC Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics Conference in 2015 and 2016, and served as a Chair on the AACR Program Committee for Experimental and Molecular Therapeutics in 2017. 

Lori's research has resulted in 24 issued patents, 28 published patent applications, and 87 publications in peer-reviewed journals. 



Discussant

General Session 6

Patricia A. Ganz, MD
Professor, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health
UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center

Patricia A. Ganz, M.D., a medical oncologist, has been a member of the faculty of the UCLA School of Medicine since 1978 and the UCLA School of Public Health since 1992.  Since 1993 she has been the Director of Cancer Prevention and Control Research at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center.  In 1999 she was awarded an American Cancer Society Clinical Research Professorship for “Enhancing Patient Outcomes across the Cancer Control Continuum.”  Dr. Ganz was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2007, now National Academy of Medicine.  She served on the National Cancer Institute Board of Scientific Advisors from 2002-2007 and on the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Board of Directors from 2003-2006.  She received the American Cancer Society Medal of Honor in 2010.  Dr. Ganz is a pioneer in the assessment of quality of life in cancer patients, and has focused much of her clinical and research efforts in the areas of breast cancer and its prevention. At the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, she leads the scientific program focused on Patients and Survivors.  Her major areas of research include cancer survivorship and the late effects of cancer treatment, measurement of patient reported outcomes in clinical treatment trials, and quality of care for cancer patients.  In July 2017, Dr. Ganz became Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute (JNCI). 



Moderator

Clinical Science Forum
"Cancer Genetics: Updates for Breast Cancer Care"

Judy E. Garber, MD, MPH
Director, Center for Cancer Genetics and Prevention
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Judy E. Garber is the Director of the Center for Cancer Genetics and Prevention at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She conducts research in clinical cancer genetics, with a special focus in the genetics of breast cancer. Dr. Garber has played a major role in the development of national guidelines in cancer genetics and is a leader in research into the characteristics and treatment of triple negative or basal-like breast cancer, the most common form in women with BRCA1 mutations. Her translational research focuses on the evaluation of novel agents targeting DNA repair defects in breast cancer, including PARP inhibitors for treatment and prevention of breast cancer and other BRCA-associated cancers.

Dr. Garber is a past president and current member of the Board of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the largest organization of cancer researchers in the world. She serves on the National Cancer Advisory Board of the National Cancer Institute and was elected into the National Academy of Medicine in 2013. She also serves as the Chair of the Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF) Scientific Advisory Board.



Chair

Spotlight Session 6 QOL, Survivorship, and Cost of Care

Sharon H. Giordano, MD, MPH
Department Chair
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Giordano is the Chair of the Department of Health Services Research and a Professor of Medicine in the Department of Breast Medical Oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC). Her research interests include quality of health care delivery, disparities, and outcomes for cancer patients. She is currently funded through NCI, CPRIT, the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, AHRQ, and Susan G. Komen. Dr. Giordano is the Pl of the Outreach Core on the U54 Grant with MD Anderson and the University of Puerto Rico: Partnership for Excellence in Cancer Research, and serves as the co-leader of the Risk, Detection, and Outcomes Program for the MD Anderson Cancer Center Support Grant. She has over 200 publications and a track record of continuous Pl funding since 2004. She serves on national committees including as the co-Chair of ASCO's Breast Cancer Guideline Advisory Group and as a member of the NCCN Breast Cancer Guideline Panel. Dr. Giordano is on the editorial boards for the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Cancer, and the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.



Speaker

Translational Science Forum
"Modulation of anti-tumor immunity using CDK4/6 inhibitors"

Discussant
Spotlight Session 7: Biology of Invasive Lobular and Endocrine Resistant Breast Cancer

Shom Goel, B Med Sci, MBBS, FRACP, PhD
Instructor in Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr Goel is a physician-scientist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School in Boston. He graduated from the University of Adelaide Medical School in 2002 and subsequently completed medical oncology training in Sydney. In 2009, he relocated to Boston to conduct his doctoral research in the laboratory of Rakesh K. Jain at the Massachusetts General Hospital. He was appointed as a Goldfarb-Rudkin Fellow in Breast Oncology at Dana-Farber in 2009, and has since developed a strong interest in new therapies targeting fundamental oncogenes in breast cancers. Of note, he has characterized a novel transgenic mouse model of HER2-positive disease that has facilitated the discovery of key mechanisms underlying resistance to HER2-blockade. His landmark discoveries in the laboratory have spurred the development of new clinical trials for patients with metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. More recently, he has focused on the interactions between oncogenic signaling pathways and the immune microenvironment in breast cancers. Dr Goel currently sits on a number of international advisory panels, leads several clinical trials, and oversees translational studies for global randomized studies of CDK4/6 inhibitors in breast cancer. He is the recipient of two University Medals, the Bryan Hudson Medal (RACP), a Fulbright Scholarship, an ASCO Young Investigator Award, and a Fellowship from the American Australian Association.



Panelist

Special Session
"View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?"

Matthew P. Goetz, MD
Professor of Oncology and Pharmacology
Mayo Clinic

Matthew P. Goetz, MD, is a consultant in the Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Oncology, at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Dr. Goetz joined the staff of Mayo Clinic in 2003 and holds the academic rank of professor of oncology and pharmacology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science. 

Dr. Goetz leads breast cancer research activities at Mayo Clinic where he is chair of the Mayo Breast Cancer Disease Group, co-leader of the Women’s Cancer Program within the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, and co-director of the Mayo Breast Cancer SPORE. 

Dr. Goetz has been extensively involved in both translational research as well as in the conduct of early- and late-phase clinical trials. A notable area of his focus has been the pharmacogenetics of tamoxifen, where he has led numerous secondary analyses of prospective clinical trials as well as the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guidelines for clinical dosing of tamoxifen based on CYP2D6 genotype. Out of this work, and in collaboration with the Developmental Therapeutics Program of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Dr. Goetz has led a team of investigators in the development of a novel formulation of endoxifen for the treatment of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer though both phase I and II clinical studies. 

Another area of research focus has been conduct of prospective clinical studies in the early (BEAUTY) and late-stage (PROMISE) setting in which a comprehensive “omic” approach along with the collection of paitent-derived xenografts (PDX) and detailed response phenotypes have been collected, studied and published. A critical element of these studies has been the collection of PDX both before and after drug treatment that is matched with clinical “omic” data. These models are allowing Dr. Goetz and his colleagues to determine whether the genetic alterations identified by sequencing have functional consequences as it relates to drug treatment response and are leading to a major effort to develop new drug combinations in patients with disease resistance after receiving standard therapy. 

Dr. Goetz is active in professional organizations, currently serving on committees and panels for the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and the National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Steering Committee.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Systems approaches to attacking cancer vulnerabilities defined by metabolic, de-differentiation and genomic instability states"

Thomas G. Graeber, PhD
Professor
University of California Los Angeles

Dr. Thomas G. Graeber, PhD is a professor at the University of California Los Angeles. His group is working to understand cancer and disease signaling and metabolism, resistance to molecularly targeted drugs, and immune function from a systems viewpoint. The group develops and applies genome-, proteome- and metabolome-wide mass spectrometry-based detection assays, uses mathematical and computational approaches to analyze their data, and follow-up their discoveries with targeted validation experiments. Data from their unbiased approaches has repeatedly led them to characterize feedback loops and synergies in cancer and immune biology. In this work, they have pioneered using genome scale approaches (e.g. proteomics) side by side with targeted approaches (e.g. antibody-based) in iterative experimentation to simultaneously build a network-scale and a molecularly detailed view of biological processes. 

Dr. Graeber’s PhD is in Physics, and he has 25 years of experience in cancer research. He is director of the UCLA Metabolomics Center. The UCLA Metabolomics Center provides mass-spectrometry-based metabolomic assays at UCLA and internationally. He has assisted in experiment design, data collection and data analysis contributing to over 25 manuscripts in the last 4 years.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Late recurrence in ER-positive breast cancer"

Julie R. Gralow, MD
Professor
University of Washington

Dr. Julie Gralow, MD is the Director of Breast Medical Oncology and the Jill Bennett Endowed Professor of Breast Oncology at the University of Washington/Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. She serves as Executive Officer for Breast and Lung Cancer for the SWOG cancer research network.  



Speaker
Educational Session
"New data on hormones and risk of breast cancer"

Susan E. Hankinson, ScD
Professor and Chair of Epidemiology
University of Massachusetts

Dr. Susan E. Hankinson is professor of Epidemiology and Chair, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, MA. Her research addresses the role of endogenous hormones in the etiology of breast cancer in women, including determining the lifestyle and genetic factors that influence hormone levels. This focus reflects a broad interest in the application of biomarkers in epidemiologic research. Much of her research has been conducted with the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and Nurses’ Health Study II (NHSII) cohorts, where she is a senior investigator. She has conducted projects to evaluate the role of endogenous hormones and nutritional factors in breast cancer etiology in postmenopausal women. This work has helped establish circulating sex steroids and prolactin as independent predictors of risk in postmenopausal women; projects are now ongoing to evaluate if these markers can be used to improve breast cancer risk prediction models, which in turn could help guide screening and chemoprevention recommendations. Dr. Hankinson is also leading several projects assessing plasma and urinary markers that predict risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women – both to identify new biologic pathways and again to improve individual breast cancer risk prediction. Other current interests include evaluating stress markers, risk factors by breast cancer subtype, and incorporating tissue molecular characteristics into my research.



Presenter
Debate
"Should all women with breast cancer and positive lymph nodes receive chemotherapy?"

Daniel F. Hayes, MD, FASCO, FACP
Stuart B. Padnos Professor of Breast Cancer Research
University of Michigan

Dr. Daniel F. Hayes is the Stuart B. Padnos Professor of Breast Cancer Research, Professor of Internal Medicine, and Clinical Director, Breast Oncology Program (BOP), UMCCC. He is an authority in the field of breast cancer translational and clinical research and clinical care. His research focus is on the identification and validation of tumor biomarker tests. 

Dr. Hayes received undergraduate, graduate (MS) and medical (MD) degrees from Indiana University, and completed a residency in Internal Medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School and a fellowship in medical oncology at Harvard's Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, where he served on the faculty as Medical Director of the Breast Evaluation Center through 1996. He moved to Georgetown University as Director of the Breast Cancer Program of the Lombardi Cancer Center and in 2001 relocated to the UM. 

He has published over 200 peer-reviewed publications, 24 clinical guidelines, and over 175 chapters, reviews, editorials and other educationally-related materials and has edited or co-edited five text books and serves as the Breast Cancer Section Editor for the on-line medical textbook, UpToDate™.   He has directed translational  investigations of several tumor marker tests for breast cancer, including tissue angiogenesis, estrogen receptor, and HER2 status, germline pharmacogenomics, and serum levels of CA15-3 (MUC-1 protein) and circulating tumor cells and tumor DNA. Dr. Hayes is currently Pl of a Susan G. Komen for the Cure* award I chair, or has chaired, several national and international scientific committees, including the Breast Cancer Translational Medicine subcommittee of SWOG, in which he mentored young investigators from other centers. He was the inaugural recipient of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Gianni Bonadonna Breast Cancer Award {2007), given for achievement in translational research and mentoring. 

Dr. Hayes has held many leadership roles in ASCO, for which he is currently serving as Immediate Past-President (2015-2018).



Speaker
Workshop
"Phase I clinical trials: Is there more than 3+3?"

Susan G. Hilsenbeck, PhD
Professor
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Hilsenbeck has a PhD in Applied Statistics. She is a Professor of Medicine and a founding member of the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX. She also leads the Biostatistics and Informatics Shared Resource in the Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center at BCM, and has more than 25 years of experience as a faculty biostatistician collaborator on a wide range of biomedical research projects. Dr. Hilsenbeck is the statistician of record for a number of active and completed cancer clinical trials, and is most interested in early phase drug development, especially small biologically driven trials with strong 'predictive' hypotheses and integrated correlative science.

Dr. Hilsenbeck is a Vice Chair of the BCM IRB and also serves on the Steering Committee of the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) where she co-leads the Statistician Working Group of the TBCRC.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 9: Metastasis/Microenvironment 

Katherine A. Hoadley, PhD
Assistant Professor
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Dr. Katherine Hoadley is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Genetics and the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Her research interests include integrative genomic analyses to better understand cancer. She has been a member of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Project for over a decade and helped lead TCGA's effort to genomically characterize breast cancer (Nature 2018). She was co-first author for TCGA’s pancancer subtype analysis which was listed by ASCO as one of the Clinical Cancer Advances of 2015 and selected by the Clinical Research Forum as one of the Top Ten Clinical Research Achievements Awards of 2015.  



Chairman
Debate
"Should all women with breast cancer and positive lymph nodes receive chemotherapy?"

Clifford A. Hudis, MD
Chief Executive Officer
American Society of Clinical Oncology

Dr. Hudis is the CEO of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, its Conquer Cancer Foundation and its wholly owned subsidiary, CancerLinQ, LLC. Before assuming these roles he served for nearly two decades as the Chief of the Breast Medicine Service and Attending Physician at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York City where he was also a Professor of Medicine at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University. He was co-chair of the Breast Committee of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology (formerly Cancer and Leukemia Group), Chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, a former Associate Editor of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, and the President of ASCO during its 50th anniversary year, 2013-2014. His entire clinical career was focused on breast cancer care and research. Initially focusing on high risk, curable disease, he led studies that integrated hemtopoetic growth factors, taxanes and later targeted agents while translating the predictions of the Norton-Simon Hypothesis that dose-dense therapy should be superior into feasible adjuvant regimens.  



Moderator
General Session 2

Discussant
Spotlight Session 3 Next Steps in HER2+ Targeted Therapy

Sara Hurvitz, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
UCLA Medical Center

Sara A Hurvitz, MD, is Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA); co-director of the Santa Monica-UCLA Outpatient Oncology Practice; Medical Director of the Clinical Research Unit of the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA; and Director of Breast Oncology. Dr. Hurvitz earned her MD from the University of Southern California. She served internship/residency at UCLA, was Chief Resident of internal medicine and completed a hematology-oncology fellowship at UCLA in 2006. Dr. Hurvitz received board-certification in internal medicine, hematology, and medical oncology.  She is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Association of Cancer Research and is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians. 

Dr. Hurvitz has won numerous awards over the past few years, among them the Marni Levine Memorial Breast Cancer Research Award 2008 through 2015. She has an active clinical practice specializing in the treatment of women with breast cancer. She is involved in designing, implementing and leading multiple national and international clinical trials testing new targeted therapies and also leads the preclinical evaluation of novel breast cancer targets in the Translation Oncology Research Laboratory at UCLA.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 2 Biomarkers in Clinical Trials

Michail Ignatiadis, MD, PhD
Medical Oncologist
Institute Jules Bordet



Speaker

Mini-Symposium
"Overtreatment: First, do no harm"

Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil
Professor and Deputy Chair
Michigan Medicine

Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil, is Professor and Deputy Chair in the Department of Radiation Oncology and Director of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine at the University of Michigan. She graduated first in her class from Harvard College and then pursued her medical training at Harvard Medical School. She also served as a fellow in the Center for Ethics at Harvard University and completed her doctorate in Social Policy at Oxford University as a Marshall Scholar. Dr. Jagsi’s medical research focuses on improving the quality of care received by breast cancer patients, both by advancing the ways in which breast cancer is treated with radiation and by advancing the understanding of patient decision-making, cost, and access to appropriate care. Her social scientific research includes research into issues of bioethics arising from cancer care and research regarding gender issues, including studies of women's representation in the medical profession. She is the author of over 200 articles in peer-reviewed journals, and her research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the American Cancer Society, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and other philanthropic foundations. She serves as the radiation oncology liaison for the Breast Committee of SWOG and as a representative on the National Cancer Institute’s BOLD task force, and she is also active in NRG and the TBCRC. She has been elected to the Board of Directors of ASCO and serves on numerous other influential national professional committees.



Chair

Spotlight Session 8: What's New in Loco-Regional Therapy

Ismail Jatoi, MD, PhD
Professor and Chief, Division of Surgical Oncology and Endocrine Surgery
UT Health San Antonio

Dr. Ismail Jatoi is Professor and Chief of the Division of Surgical Oncology and Endocrine Surgery at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio, Texas.   He is the holder of the Dale H. Dorn Endowed Chair in Surgery.  Dr. Jatoi obtained his undergraduate bachelor’s degree from Washington University in St. Louis and his MD and PhD degrees from St. Louis University.  He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Surgery and a fellow of the American College of Surgeons.  He completed fellowship training in surgical oncology at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London, England.  Dr. Jatoi served on active duty in the US Army for many years and retired with the rank of Colonel.  During his years in the military, he received numerous awards, including the Bronze Star and Legion of Merit.  Dr. Jatoi was formerly a Professor of Surgery at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, Maryland, and continues to hold an Adjunct Professor appointment at that institution.  Dr. Jatoi has had a longstanding interest in breast cancer local therapy and adjuvant systemic therapy, the management of women at increased risk for breast cancer, and breast cancer screening.  He also has an interest in the design and analysis of cancer clinical trials.  Dr. Jatoi has previously served on the Breast Cancer Executive Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG).  He is the Principal Investigator of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, and serves on the national NSABP Working Group.  Additionally, he served as interim Co-Director of the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) in 2014, and continues to serve on the SABCS Executive Committee and its Planning Committee.



Speaker

Educational Session
"Recurrent ESR1 mutations activating mutations in breast cancer "

Rinath Jeselsohn, MD
Instructor in Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Rinath Jeselsohn is a physician scientist and Medical Oncologist at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Her research focuses on mechanisms of endocrine resistance in breast cancer. In particular, she studies genomic and epigenetic alterations in acquired hormone resistance, employing pre-clinical models as well as human tissue specimens. Her work, as well as other groups has led to the identification of ESR1 mutations that render constitutive activity and endocrine resistance. More recently she has shown that the ESR1 mutations have allele specific neomorphic functions and are drivers of metastases.

Dr. Jeselsohn spends one day a week caring for breast cancer patients at the Breast Oncology Center at DFCI. More recently, she joined the Early Drug Development Center (EDDC) at DFCI as the breast cancer representative and is responsible for managing the breast cancer patients enrolled in the EDDC Phase I studies. In summary, she is a physician-scientist active in translational research studying mechanisms of endocrine resistance and strategies to improve treatment for hormone receptor positive breast cancers. Dr. Jeselsohn is also engaged in the care of breast cancer patients and innovative clinical trials with the goal to identify new treatments to improve outcomes in breast cancer patients.



Speaker
Translational Science Forum
"Lessons learned from the development of PI3K inhibitors in metastatic breast cancer"

Dejan Juric, MD
Medical Director of Translational Research
Termeer Center for Targeted Therapies
Massachusetts General Hospital

The primary focus of Dr. Juric's research is early drug development of isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors such as GDC0032, BYL719 and MLN1117. He is also interested in the identification of genetic alterations and cell signaling networks which confer resistance or modulate the action of anti-HER2 agents and selective PI3K-p110-alpha inhibitors in cancer cell line models and patient-derived tumor xenografts, with the aim to develop new combinatorial treatment strategies for patients with advanced malignancies harboring HER2 amplifications and/or PI3K-pathway alterations. 

Dr. Juric has an extensive background in basic cancer biology research including four years of postdoctoral training in the field of cancer pharmacology and drug resistance, working on mechanisms of resistance to taxanes and alkylating anticancer agents. He subsequently completed his clinical training in Internal Medicine, followed by fellowship in medical oncology at the DFCI, and in the Phase I Program at the MGH Cancer Center, directly working as a clinical investigator on multiple early drug development trials. 

He is currently the coordinating principal investigator for a number of clinical trials with GDC0032, BYL719 and MLN1117, and their combinations. In addition to the implementation and supervision of clinical trials, he has established the Termeer Center Tumor Bank and directs serial biopsy and rapid autopsy programs, ultimately aimed at deeper understanding of therapeutic implications of temporal and spatial heterogeneity of PIK3CA-mutant breast cancer and other solid tumors. 



Moderator

Workshop
"Clinical Research"

Moderator
Educational Session
"Updates in the Treatment of Triple Negative Breast Cancer"

Virginia G. Kaklamani, MD
Professor
UT Heath San Antonio

Dr. Kaklamani is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology/Oncology at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio and is the Leader of the Breast Cancer Program at the Cancer Therapy and Research Center. Dr. Kaklamani completed her medical training with honors at the University of Athens and her residency in Internal Medicine at Newton-Wellesley Hospital in Boston, MA. She completed her fellowship in hematology/oncology at Northwestern University. She also received a Master of Science in Clinical Investigation from Northwestern University.

She was Head of the Translational Breast Cancer Program at Northwestern University and co-director of the cancer genetics program at the same institution. Her research interests include studying high risk families and identifying genetic mutations that are associated with an increased risk for breast, colon and prostate cancer. She has identified several genetic mutations related to obesity which increase the risk of breast cancer. Dr Kaklamani is a clinical investigator with expertise in designing clinical trials with targeted agents.



Speaker

Mini-Symposium
"Deep learning systems for reading mammograms and breast tomosynthesis"

Nico Karssemeijer, PhD
Professor
Radboud University Medical Centre

Nico Karssemeijer is professor of Computer-Aided Diagnosis. He studied Physics at Delft University of Technology and graduated at the Radboud University Nijmegen, department of Medical Physics. In 1989 he joined the Department of Radiology of the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center where he formed a research group in computer aided detection (CAD). His professorship is in the Faculty of Science of the Radboud University in the section Intelligent Systems of the Institute for Computing and Information Sciences iCIS.

He was Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging from 1996 - 2014, and member of the Editorial Boards of Physics in Medicine and Biology 2008 -2016. He is currently a member of the editorial board Medical Image Analysis. In 2012 and 2013 he was symposium chair of SPIE Medical Imaging while previously he chaired IWDM98 and IPMI 2007.

Nico Karssemeijer was closely involved in the development of the R2 ImageChecker, the most widely used CAD system to date, and is co-founder of Matakina, Ltd. (Wellington, New Zealand), a company that develops technology for quantitative mammography. In 2014, he founded ScreenPoint, a company developing image analysis technology for automated reading of mammograms and digital breast tomosynthesis.



Speaker

Mini-Symposium
"Artificial intelligence for healthcare"

TBD



Chair

Spotlight Session 3 Next Steps in HER2+ Targeted Therapy

Ian Krop, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Ian Elliott Krop, MD, PhD, is the Chief of Breast Medical Oncology and the Director of Clinical Research for the Breast Oncology Program at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. He is also an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. 

Dr. Krop is a translational investigator focused on the development of novel molecularly targeted therapies and immunotherapies for breast cancer, and elucidating the mechanisms of resistance to these treatments. The majority of his effort is concentrated in the area of HER2+ breast cancer. He was a leader in the development of the antibody-drug conjugate trastuzumab emtainsine (T-DM1).  

He is a member of the National Cancer Institute’s Breast Cancer Steering Committee and co-chairs its Immuno-Oncology Working Group. He is also the co-vice chair for correlative science for the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology. He is a member of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Data Monitoring Committee, and is co-chair of the HER2-working group of the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium.  

Dr. Krop is a graduate of Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He trained at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He completed a medical oncology fellowship at Dana-Farber.



Speaker
Clinical Science Forum
"Breast cancer genetic testing and results in diverse populations"

Allison W. Kurian, MD, MSc
Associate Professor of Medicine and Health Research and Policy
Stanford University School of Medicine

Dr. Kurian’s research focuses on the identification of women with elevated breast and gynecologic cancer risk, and on the development and evaluation of novel techniques for early cancer detection and risk reduction. Dr. Kurian has published more than 135 peer-reviewed articles, including several in high-impact journals such as JAMA, Journal of Clinical Oncology, and Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 

As Director of the Stanford Women’s Clinical Cancer Genetics Program, her practice centers on women at high risk of breast and gynecologic cancers. Dr. Kurian serves on several national committees that advance the clinical and research mission of women’s cancer genetics: she develops evidence-based practice guidelines as a member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and she recently led the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s Scientific Program Committee for Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention. 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Windows of susceptibility across the lifecourse and breast cancer"

Lawrence H. Kushi, ScD
Director of Scientific Policy
Kaiser Permanente Northern California

Dr. Lawrence Kushi is a nutritional epidemiologist conducting research in cancer prevention and outcomes.  Among other activities, he chaired the 2012 American Cancer Society Committee on Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines for Cancer Prevention, led the methodology committee for the World Cancer Research Fund on its review of the literature relating food, nutrition and physical activity to breast cancer outcomes, and has served on the Council for Extramural Grants for the American Cancer Society and the Integration Panel for the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program.  He is currently Principal Investigator of NCI-supported research projects that include the Pathways Study, a prospective cohort study investigating diet, physical activity, and other factors as they influence outcomes in 4,505 women diagnosed with breast cancer; the Be-Well Study, a project examining dietary factors including cruciferous vegetable intake and bladder cancer recurrence; and the NCI's Cancer Research Network, supporting cancer research in a nationwide consortium of health care systems.  He was also Principal Investigator of the CYGNET Study (Cohort Study of Young Girls' Nutrition, Environment and Transitions), one of three prospective cohort studies that together formed the puberty studies of the NIEHS/NCI Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program.  These studies are examining predictors of early age at onset of puberty, including breast budding and development, as an early lifecourse marker of breast cancer risk.  A graduate of Amherst College and the Harvard School of Public Health, Dr. Kushi has held research and faculty positions at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the University of Minnesota, and Columbia University where he held the Ella McCollum Vahlteich Chair in Nutrition.  He joined Kaiser Permanente Northern California in 2002, where he is currently Director of Scientific Policy in its Division of Research.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 4 Breast Cancer Screening and Imaging

Janie M. Lee, MD, MSc
Associate Professor of Radiology
Seattle Cancer Care Alliance



Moderator
Educational Session
"Insights and Controversies in Metastasis Biology"

Michael Lewis, PhD
Professor
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Michael Lewis has been conducting laboratory-based research in the area of breast development and cancer since 1995 which has been funded continuously for the last 22 years, and has over 80 publications in this area. He has served on multiple grant review panels, as a member of the editorial board for two journals, and as an ad hoc manuscript reviewer for multiple journals over the years.



Speaker

Educational Session
"Link between BRCA1 and Pol II pausing in mammary gland development and tumorigenesis"

Rong Li, PhD
Professor
The George Washington University

Dr. Rong Li’s research focuses on transcriptional regulation and breast cancer biology. His laboratory identified NELF-B and subsequently established the first animal model for investigating the physiological relevance of NELF-dependent RNA polymerase II pausing. In addition, they previously demonstrated the transcriptional regulatory and chromatin remodeling activities of the breast cancer susceptibility gene product BRCA1 and their connections with the tissue-specific tumor suppression function of BRCA1. Other research projects in his laboratory include the impact of stroma on breast cancer development and progression, and the role of transcription factor ERβ signaling in antitumor functions.

He has published 78 scientific papers, many in high-impact journals including Nature, Cell, Genes Dev, Cell Rep, Nat Commun, PNAS, and J Clin Invest. Four of the publications have been cited over 100 times. Dr. Li has served on several NIH study sections and other review panels for federal and private funding agencies. He is currently a regular member on the NIH Tumor Microenvironment (TME) study section and has served on the Program Committee of the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, the world’s largest breast cancer symposium and as the Co-Leader of the Cancer Development and Progression (CDP) Program of the NCI-designated Mays Cancer Center at the UT Health San Antonio since 2008.



Moderator

Basic Science Forum
"Peering into Tumor-Microenvironment Interaction in Metastasis"

Yi Li, PhD
Professor
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Yi Li is a Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology at Baylor College of Medicine. He studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms of breast cancer initiation and evolution as well as breast cancer prevention. Additionally, he studies the impact of pregnancy and diabetes on breast tumorigenesis and metastasis.

He obtained his PhD from Michigan State University and he began breast cancer research when he started his postdoctoral training with Dr. Harold Varmus (first at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, and then at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York). His laboratory pioneered the use of the RCAS-TVA avian retroviral system for modeling sporadic breast cancer in mice, delineated anticancer barriers during breast cancer initiation, discovered a molecular mechanism underlying increased breast cancer risk caused by late-age first pregnancy, and established intermittent anti-STAT5 for preventing breast cancer.



Speaker

Workshop
"Incorporating patient reported outcomes and functional measures into clinical trials"

Discussant
General Session 5

Jennifer A. Ligibel, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Jennifer Ligibel is the Director of the Leonard P. Zakim Center for Integrative Therapies and Healthy Living at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Ligibel’s research focuses on the impact of lifestyle interventions upon cancer-related outcomes in women with breast cancer. She has conducted a number of studies looking at the impact of exercise and weight loss interventions upon patients’ quality of life and symptoms after cancer diagnosis and is currently leading an NCI-funded Phase III clinical trial that will test the impact of a weight loss intervention upon the risk of disease recurrence in more than 3000 overweight and obese women with early-stage breast cancer.

Dr. Ligibel is also the current Chair of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Subcommittee on Energy Balance, which has developed patient and physician materials to help facilitate healthy lifestyle changes after cancer diagnosis.



Moderator
Educational Session
"Contemporary Management of Breast Cancer Brain Metastases"

Speaker
Educational Session
"Systemic therapy for breast cancer brain metastases"

Nancy U. Lin, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Harvard Medical School

Nancy Lin, MD is the Clinical Director of the Breast Oncology Center for the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Director of the Metastatic Breast Cancer Program, and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.  Her research is focused upon developing novel therapies for patients with metastatic breast cancer and in understanding mechanisms of therapeutic resistance. 

She has led multiple trials of novel systemic approaches for metastatic breast cancer, including patients with breast cancer brain metastases. She has had national and international leadership roles, including serving as the overall PI of several multi-center studies, co-chair of the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology metastatic working group, Chair of the Friends of Cancer-American Society Modernizing Eligibility Criteria Project-Brain Metastasis Working Group, and membership in national and international guidelines committees for the management of metastatic breast cancer. 

Dr. Lin is also experienced in tissue- and blood-based translational research, and with the construction and analysis of clinical databases.  She is the PI of the breast oncology-specific tissue banking protocol at Dana-Farber, Co-Chair of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Clinical Data and Tissue Users’ Committee, and PI of active protocols allowing prospective consent for research biopsies with linked clinical data across all stages of breast cancer, and of the EMBRACE (Ending Metastatic Breast Cancer for Everyone) metastatic cohort study. She serves as the DF/HCC institutional PI for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium.  

Dr. Lin received her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and medical degree from Harvard Medical School. She subsequently completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and fellowships in hematology and medical oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.



Speaker
Translational Science Forum
"Beyond B cells: Targeting BCL-2 pro-survival proteins in breast cancer"

Geoffrey Lindeman, MBBS, FRACP, PhD
Joint Division Head
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research

Dr Geoff Lindeman, a clinician-scientist, is Joint Head of the Stem Cells and Cancer Division at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute (WEHI). He is also a medical oncologist at the Royal Melbourne Hospital and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne, Australia. He holds an honorary appointment as Professorial Fellow in the Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne. He is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences and the Australian Academy of Science.

After medical oncology training, he obtained his PhD at The University of Melbourne and next pursued postdoctoral training at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School. Following this, he established a Breast Cancer Laboratory at WEHI, jointly headed with Dr Jane Visvader. His group is studying molecular regulators of normal mammary gland development and cancer, with a particular interest in understanding how mammary stem cells and their progeny contribute to the mammary epithelial cell hierarchy and breast cancer. Recent work has led to the discovery of RANK-positive progenitors as a target for breast cancer prevention in BRCA1 mutation carriers, and pre-clinical data to support combining dual checkpoint inhibitor therapy with chemotherapy for BRCA1-associated tumors. His laboratory is also using patient derived xenograft (PDX) models to test promising anti-cancer agents. Pre-clinical studies using BH3 mimetics have led to early phase studies of he BCL-2 inhibitor venetoclax in breast cancer.



Speaker

Workshop
"Designing immunotherapeutic trials"

Sherene Loi, MBBS (Hons), FRACP, PhD, FAHMS
Professor of Oncology
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre

Dr. Sherene Loi is a Medical Oncologist specialized in breast cancer treatment as well as clinician scientist with expertise in genomics, immunology and drug development. Her work is focused on developing new therapeutic approaches that may improve outcomes of breast cancer patients.

After completing Medical Oncology specialist clinical training in 2003 she undertook a PhD and postdoctoral studies at the Institut Jules Bordet in Brussels, Belgium (2003-2012). In 2013, she returned to head the newly created Translational Breast Cancer Genomics and Therapeutics laboratory at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, as well as Consultant Medical Oncologist in the Breast Service and head of the Breast Cancer Clinical Trials Unit.

Dr. Loi is recognised internationally as a leading clinician scientist whose work has led to new insights into the immunology field in breast cancer. As a result of her research, she leads a number of international breast cancer clinical trials in immunotherapy. Over her career to date, she has published 150 peer-reviewed research articles with a lifetime H index of 46. Her recent work has been highly influential with 14,651 total citations and 10,532 (72%) within the past 5 years (Google Scholar). She is on the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Australia New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group (BCT Australia/NZ), which is the largest breast cancer clinical trials cooperative group in Australia and also co-chairs the Translational Working Group of the International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) based in Bern, Switzerland which conducts academic global breast cancer clinical trials in over 16 countries world-wide. She is the current holder of the inaugural National Breast Cancer Foundation of Australia Endowed Chair. Dr. Loi is a research fellow of the Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF), New York and is on the Scientific Committee for Breast Cancer for the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).



Speaker

Educational Session
"Mining noncoding mutations for drivers of development in ER alpha-positive breast cancer"

Mathieu Lupien, PhD
Senior Scientist
Princess Margaret Cancer Centre

Dr. Mathieu Lupien is a Senior Scientist at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and an Associate Professor in the Department of Medical Biophysics at the University of Toronto. He is cross-appointed at UHN's Princess Margaret Cancer Centre. He earned his Ph.D. at McGill University (Montreal, Canada) in 2005, after which he pursued postdoctoral training in medical oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School (Boston, MA) as an Era of Hope fellow. Dr. Lupien completed his postdoctoral training in 2008 and was recruited as a faculty member at the Dartmouth Medical School (Hanover, NH) in 2009, where he became Director of the Quantitative Epigenomics Laboratory before moving to the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in 2012.

Dr. Lupien is recognized for three seminal discoveries, namely that epigenetic modifications on histones can discriminate cell type-specific noncoding gene regulatory elements; that epigenetic alterations at gene regulatory elements underlie cancer initiation and progression; and that noncoding genetic alterations promoting cancer development preferentially target gene regulatory elements. Among other honours, Dr. Lupien is a recipient of the Investigator Award from the OICR, the New Investigator Salary Award from CIHR, the Rising Star in Prostate Cancer Research award from PCC/Movember and the Till and McCulloch Discovery of the Year award.



Discussant 

Spotlight Session 6 QOL, Survivorship, and Cost of Care

Jeanne Mandelblatt, MD, MPH
Associate Director for Population Sciences
Georgetown University



Chair 

Spotlight Session 4 Breast Cancer Screening and Imaging

David Mankoff, MD, PhD
Vice -Chair for Research
University of Pennsylvania



Speaker

Plenary Lecture
"Neoadjuvant Endocrine Therapy: The Times They are A-Changing"

Ingrid A. Mayer, MD, MSCI
Professor of Medicine
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Program Leader and Co-Director of the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center Breast Cancer Program and SPORE: Dr. Ingrid A. Mayer has scientific and administrative oversight, and is responsible for directing the BCP's and Breast Cancer SPORE activities and functions, and contributes to the strategic planning retreats and initiatives to define the future directions of VICC. She also oversees and coordinates all clinical research in breast cancer, and works with the other cores in the VICC Breast Cancer SPORE to successfully achieve the aims of the program. As the Medical Oncology director of the Breast Center, she supervises the clinical operation of the Medical Oncology clinic (including the breast cancer research team operation at OHO) and is the liaison between the Division of Hematology/ Oncology and the Medical Oncology, Imaging and Surgical services at the Breast Center.

As the Cooperative Oncology Group Membership and Study Chair Dr. Mayer has been an active member of the Breast Cancer Core Committee for ECOG-ACRIN since 2004 and has been Chair and/or Co-Chair of several large national ongoing phase III randomized trials and has been representing Vanderbilt as an active Panel Member of the NCCN Breast Cancer Panel of Experts since 2007.

Since the creation of Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) in 2005, she has been highly involved with the TBCRC, and in 2009, Dr. Mayer became the co-Chair of the TBCRC Endocrine Resistance Working Group (ERWG). She continues to be invited to the national professional oncology society meetings to deliver several oral presentations on her research work at the most prestigious national meetings, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology and continues to be invited as a discussant for oral presentations at (ASCO) an Annual Meeting and the San Antonio Breast Cancer Annual Symposium (SABCS) on a yearly basis. Dr. Mayer is invited to give lectures in state-of-the-art diagnosis, prognosis, biology and management of breast cancer at national and international symposium venues for Continuing Medical Education (CME) and is a frequent lecturer for Vanderbilt-based yearly didactic lectures in numerous yearly Breast Cancer lecture series for the Internal Medicine residents, Radiation Oncology residents, Hematology/Oncology fellows and her Breast Cancer Research Team.

In her capacity as Course Director, Breast Tumor Board; Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, she supervises the content at each weekly meeting from educational, management, and scheduling points of view (including keeping up with the agenda) and also submits biannual evaluations to the VUMC CME office and ensures minimal attendance from the different multidisciplinary specialties required for case discussions.

She consistently supervises and trains Hematology/Oncology fellows, PGY-2 Internal Medicine residents (as part of the Women's Health Rotation), PGY-2 Surgery residents (as part of their Breast Center Rotation), and sometimes medical students during her weekly Breast Cancer clinics and is responsible for the education and evaluation of the medical oncology nurse practitioners at the Vanderbilt Breast Center.



Speaker

Educational Session
"Current status of diagnosis, monitoring, and non-surgical management of lymphedema"

Sarah A. McLaughlin, MD
Associate Professor of Surgery
Mayo Clinic

Sarah McLaughlin is an Associate Professor of Surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville Florida. She graduated from the University of Missouri-Kansas City Medical School with distinction. She completed her General Surgery residency training at the Mayo Clinic in Florida and then a Breast Surgical Oncology fellowship at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. She has an active breast surgery clinical practice and is an NIH funded investigator with a specific focus in issues affecting survivorship especially lymphedema diagnosis and treatment.

Dr. McLaughlin is a member of multiple national organizations and is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. She serves on several national committees interested in the education of breast surgeons and surgical fellows including The American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) Continuing Medical Education Committee, the Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO) Continuing Medical Education Committee, and is vice-chair of the SSO Training Committee. She is the Editor for the ASBrS Breast Education Self-Assessment Program (BESAP), is the past chair of the ASBrS CME subcommittee of Selected Readings granting MOC self-assessment credits to participants and was the Program Chair for the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Breast Surgeons. Within the Mayo Clinic, she is the course director for the Mayo Clinic Multidisciplinary Update in Breast Health, serves as the Program Director for the General Surgery Residency, and is the Medical Director of the Robert and Monica Jacoby Center for Breast Health.

Further the Mayo Clinic has recognized Dr. McLaughlin as a Mayo Clinic Foundation Scholar, Outstanding Course Director, Faculty Teacher of the Year, and Outstanding CME Faculty. The city of Jacksonville recognizes Dr. McLaughlin as a Health care Hero for her contributions to the Jacksonville breast cancer community.



Speaker

Educational Session
"Lymphedema management in 2018: Are we making any progress?"

Babak J. Mehrara, MD
Chief, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Service
Memorial Soan Kettering Cancer Center

Babak J. Mehrara, MD, is the Chief of the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Service and the William G. Cahon Endowed Chair in the Department of Surgery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK), with a joint appointment as Professor of Surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College. Dr. Mehrara is an oncologic reconstructive surgeon with a broad background in both the clinical management and the biology of cancer. 

He has authored more than 200 peer-reviewed publications and serves as the Director of the National Institutes of Health-funded Lymphatic Biology Laboratory at MSK. 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Exosome-mediated stimulation of metastasis"

Andy J. Minn, MD
Associate Professor 
University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Minn is an Associate Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology and Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his MD and PhD from the University of Chicago, and finished his residency in radiation oncology and his post-doctoral training at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. His laboratory is focused on understanding how solid tumors metastasize and acquire treatment resistance to both conventional therapies and to immunotherapies, and how resistance can be overcome. To better understand the basis for these aggressive features, his lab utilizes multi- and high-dimensional data-driven approaches towards both experimental and translational research goals. Using these methods, his group has identified regulatory networks and signaling pathways found across multiple cancer types that control tumor progression and response to therapy. These pathways include innate immune signaling, immunomodulatory endogenous RNAs, exosomes, and interferon networks. Such findings suggest an intriguing overlap between an anti-viral response and ways cancer can metastasize, evade effects of therapy, and promote immunosuppression. Therefore, he is currently investigating how anti-viral and pattern recognition receptors are activated in cancer, both cell intrinsically and through the tumor microenvironment, and their functional significance (Boelens et al., Cell 2014; Nabet et al., Cell, 2017). These anti-viral and pattern recognition receptor pathways can also be therapeutically exploited. One way is through their activation by ablative tumor irradiation, which may underlie the ability of the DNA damage response to modulate the immune system (Twyman-Saint Victor et al., Nature 2015). Recent efforts have deduced non-redundant immune mechanisms driven by such combination immune checkpoint blockade strategies and have uncovered major resistance mechanisms that can be therapeutically reversed (Benci et al., Cell 2016). Studies using mouse models have been performed in parallel with analogous clinical trials (ClinicalTrials.gov IDs: NCT01497808; NCT02303990; NCT02639026) in order to corroborate pre-clinical results with human patients. In this way, laboratory findings can be used to inform the design of next generation clinical trials.



Moderator

Educational Session
"Management of the Axilla After Neoadjuvant Therapy: Beyond the Clinical Trials"

Panelist
Special Session
"View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?"

Monica Morrow, MD
Chief, Breast Surgical Service
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Monica Morrow, MD is chief of the Breast Surgery Service, Anne Burnett Windfohr Chair of Clinical Oncology, co-chief of the Breast Program at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and Professor of Surgery at Weill Medical College of Cornell University. Prior to this she served as the G. Willing Pepper Chair in Cancer Research and the chairman of the Department of Surgical Oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center. From 1993 to June 2004, she was Professor of Surgery at Northwestern University Medical School and director of the Lynn Sage Comprehensive Breast Program at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. From 1999 – 2001 she also served as director of the Cancer Department of the American College of Surgeons and executive director of the American Joint Committee on Cancer.

Dr. Morrow received her BS degree Magna Cum Laude from the Pennsylvania State University and her MD from Jefferson Medical College. She did her surgical residency at the Medical Center Hospital of Vermont, followed by 2 years of surgical oncology training at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

Dr. Morrow is the recipient of the Outstanding Professional Woman Award from the State of Illinois Federation of Business and Professional Women, the Alpha Omega Alpha Outstanding Clinical Faculty Award from the University of Chicago, the Women Making a Difference Award for Medical Innovations from the State of Illinois, and the Speaking of Women’s Health Foundation Award. She is a Distinguished Alumni of the Pennsylvania State University and a Distinguished Alumni of Jefferson Medical College. In 2012 she was the recipient of the Gianni Bonnadonna Breast Cancer Award from ASCO, and in 2013 she was the William McGuire lecturer at the San Antonio Breast Cancer symposium. She is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons (Glasgow) and the Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland and was the President of the Society of Surgical Oncology in 2012-13.

She is the editor of 3 breast cancer textbooks and has published more than 500 book chapters, manuscripts, and editorials. She co-chaired national committees on standards for breast conserving surgery in 2002 and 2007, and led national efforts to develop guidelines for margins for breast conserving surgery in invasive cancer and DCIS in 2013 and 2015.



Discussant

Spotlight Session 5 Immunotherapy

Rita Nanda, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
The University of Chicago Medicine



Speaker

Plenary Lecture
"Breast Tumor Evolution and Intratumor Heterogeneity - Insights from Single Cell Genomics"

Nicholas E. Navin, PhD
Associate Professor
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Navin is an associate professor at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, with a joint appointment in the Department of Genetics and the Department of Bioinformatics. He is also the co-director of the Sequencing and Microarray Core Facility at MD Anderson. He conducted his graduate training and postdoctoral training at the Cold Spring Harbor laboratory under the mentorship of Dr. Michael Wigler. During this time, he invented the first single cell DNA sequencing method (Single-Nucleus-Sequencing) for sequencing the genome of a mammalian cell (Navin et al. 2011, Nature.). This work played a pivotal role in establishing the field of single cell genomics. 

The Navin laboratory continues to be at the forefront of the single cell cancer genomics field, where they have discovered a punctuated model of copy number evolution in triple-negative breast cancer (Gao et al. 2016, Nature Genetics) and elucidated the role mutator phentoypes and subclonal mutations in breast cancer evolution (Wang et al. 2014, Nature). Dr. Navin’s group continues to pioneer the developing novel technologies for performing single cell DNA and RNA sequencing, in addition to innovative computational and statistical methods for analyzing the resulting large-scale datasets. These methods are being applied to study cancer evolution in the context of invasion, metastasis and therapy resistance. 

His laboratory works closely with leading oncologists and pathologist at MD Anderson to translate these technologies into the clinic, where they are poised to make a major impact on reducing the morbidity in human patients. Dr. Navin has been the recipient of many prestigious awards in recognition of his work, including the Damon-Runyon Innovator Award, AAAS Wachtel Award, ACS Research Scholar Award, Wilson Stone Award and the Randall Innovator Award.



Moderator

Translational Science Forum
"Interplay Between Breast Cancer Targeted Therapies and the Immune System"

Moderator
Year in Review

C. Kent Osborne, MD
Director, Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. C. Kent Osborne was born in 1946 in St. Louis, Missouri. He received his AB and MD degrees from the University of Missouri, both with honors. He completed his residency at Johns Hopkins in 1974, and his medical oncology fellowship at the NCI in 1977. He was a faculty member at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, where he rose to Professor and Director of the Division of Medical Oncology. In 1999 Dr. Osborne moved to Baylor College of Medicine to develop a Breast Center and in 2005 he became Director of the new cancer center. Currently, Dr. Osborne is Director, Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center at Baylor College of Medicine.

Dr. Osborne is a physician scientist. His research has focused on understanding the mechanisms of resistance to therapies targeting ER and HER2 and the cross-talk between these pathways. For 10 years Dr. Osborne was Chairman of the Breast Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group, where he oversaw numerous nationwide clinical trials investigating new treatment strategies. He has been the Principal Investigator of the Baylor Breast Cancer SPORE grant for 20 years. Among his previous awards are the Kernen Foundation Award for Scientific Distinction and the Brinker International Award. He has been a director of the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium® for 23 years.



Chair
Spotlight Session 2 Biomarkers in Clinical Trials

Ben Ho Park, MD, PhD
Donna Hall Professor of Medicine
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Ben Ho Park, MD, PhD, an internationally renowned breast cancer expert, was recently appointed as the co-leader of the Breast Cancer Research Program, Associate Director for Translational Research and Director of Precision Oncology at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center.   Dr. Park received his Bachelor’s degree from The University of Chicago and then completed a dual MD-PhD training program at The University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. After completing a residency in Internal Medicine and Hematology/Oncology Fellowship Training at The Hospital of The University of Pennsylvania, he finished a postdoctoral research fellowship in cancer genetics in the laboratory of Dr. Bert Vogelstein at Johns Hopkins University, and then joined the faculty in 2002 in the Breast Cancer Program. At Hopkins he was Professor of Oncology, Associate Director for Education and Research Training, as well as Associate Dean for Postdoctoral Affairs prior to joining the faculty at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. 

Dr. Park serves as Professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and leads several translational cancer research programs.   Dr. Park’s research aims to translate findings in the laboratory into new treatments and diagnostic tests for patients, and to translate relevant findings in patients back to the lab.  His laboratory research focuses on finding mutated or altered genes that are responsible for breast cancer initiation and progression, as well as genes that are mutated, leading to chemo and hormonal drug resistance. A major focus of his research is to develop non-invasive alternatives to biopsy for monitoring tumor progression and response to therapy.  He initiated a large multi-institutional prospective study to determine the utility of liquid biopsy in patients with early stage breast cancer.  This study has completed accrual and will evaluate whether liquid biopsies can provide a non-invasive alternative to determine which patients are cured and do not need further therapy vs those that are not cured and may benefit from additional interventions.




Chair & Discussant
Spotlight Session 9 Metastasis/Microenvironment

Morag Park, PhD
Director, Goodman Cancer Research Centre
McGill University

Dr. Morag Park is a Professor in the Departments of Medicine, Oncology, and Biochemistry at McGill University. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences, James McGill Professor, and holds the Diane and Sal Guerrera Chair in Cancer Genetics. Dr. Park received a B.Sc. with first class honors from the University of Glasgow, a Ph.D. in Viral carcinogenesis at the Medical Research Council Virology Institute in Scotland, and completed postdoctoral training at the National Institutes for Cancer Research in Washington DC. She was the Director of the Molecular Oncology Group at the McGill University Hospital Centre (2006-8), Scientific Director of the Institute of Cancer Research - CIHR (2008-13), Canadian Cancer Research Alliance co-chair (2008-2010) and is Director of the Goodman Cancer Research Centre (2013-present). She is a research leader in the field of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) and mechanisms of oncogenic activation of RTKs in human cancers, has recently developed leadership in the breast cancer microenvironment, and is the recipient of the Canadian Cancer Research Alliance Award (2015), the Canadian Society for Molecular Biosciences Arthur Wynne Gold Medal Prize (2016), and the Canadian Cancer Society Robert L. Noble Prize (2017). 



Speaker
AACR Outstanding Investigator Award in Breast Cancer Research, supported by the Breast Cancer Research Foundation
"Breast Cancer in Young Women: Understanding Differences to Improve Outcomes"

Ann Partridge, MD, MPH
Vice Chair of Medical Oncology
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Ann Partridge, MD, MPH is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Vice Chair of Medical Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, where she also serves as Director of the Adult Survivorship Program and leads the Program for Young Women with Breast Cancer. As a medical oncologist and clinical researcher, she has sought to improve the care and outcomes of patients with cancer by conducting research, and by developing innovative clinical programming. Dr. Partridge’s most substantial research contributions focus on the clinical epidemiology of breast cancer in young women, conducting seminal work aiming to understand and improve their care and outcomes.  She established and serves as PI for the Young Women’s Breast Cancer Study (YWS), a multi-institutional cohort of young women with breast cancer which enrolled 1300 women age 40 and young at diagnosis.  Dr. Partridge and her team have characterized a range of issues of young breast cancer survivors, including the impact of treatment on fertility, adherence with hormonal therapy, psychological adaptation to the diagnosis including impact of treatment on sexual functioning, and the factors that play an important role in patient decision-making.  More recently, she has collaborated with basic investigators to identify molecular differences in tumors found in young patients and identify potential biomarkers of long-term effects. 

Dr. Partridge serves in leadership roles nationally and internationally. She is co-chair of the Breast Committee of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology, was chair of the scientific program committee for the 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, co-chairs the biennial ESMO-ESO sponsored Breast Cancer in Young Women Conference and served as Chair of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women from 2010-17. She has received prior awards and grants including a Champions of Change award from the White House, an ASCO Improving Cancer Care Grant, the CDC Carol Friedman Award, and the Edward J. Benz Jr. Award for Advancing the Careers of Women Faculty.    

After graduating from Georgetown University, Dr. Partridge received her medical degree from Cornell University Medical College, pursued an internal medicine residency at the Hospital for the University of Pennsylvania, and completed Medical Oncology and Hematology fellowship at Dana-Farber/Partners CancerCare.  She earned a Master of Public Health degree at the Harvard School of Public Health.



Panelist
Special Session
"View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?"

Debra Patt, MD, MPH
Vice President
Texas Oncology

Dr. Debra Patt is a practicing oncologist and breast cancer specialist in Austin, Texas, and a vice president of Texas Oncology with responsibilities in healthcare policy and strategic initiatives. She is an active leader in breast cancer research, serves on the US Oncology Research breast cancer committee, and chairs the breast cancer subsection of the pathways task force for The US Oncology Network, which she has led for more than a decade. She has expertise in healthcare policy and has testified before Congress to protect access to care for Medicare beneficiaries. She is a leader in clinical cancer informatics, and is involved in system innovations to enhance care delivery. She is the Editor In Chief of the Journal of Clinical Oncology- Clinical Cancer Informatics.    

She led healthcare informatics for The US Oncology Network from 2008-2015 and continues to lead analytics as a medical director for McKesson Specialty Health. In addition to a substantial background in informatics and health economics and outcomes research, she directs public policy for Texas Oncology. Nationally, she is the past-chair of ASCO's clinical practice committee and serves on ASCO's nominating committee as well as the health IT work group and guidelines committees.   

Dr. Patt serves on the national board for the Community Oncology Alliance and local board of The Shivers Cancer Foundation. She serves on the Texas Medical Association's Council on Legislation and frequently speaks on healthcare policy at the state and federal level. She is a past chair for the Texas Medical Association's committee on cancer and has served on the council on science and public health. She is a former board member of Komen Austin and the breast cancer resource center. Dr. Patt is a nationally recognized leader in cancer research, has published many articles, and leads the service line for breast health services for the Dell Medical School in addition to leading multidisciplinary breast cancer conferences and directing breast cancer services for the Seton Family of Hospitals.



Speaker
Workshop
"Regulatory perspectives: Validation of molecular diagnostic assays"

Reena Philip, PhD
Director, Division of Molecular Genetics and Pathology
US Food and Drug Administration

Dr. Philip currently holds the position of Director in the Division of Molecular Genetics and Pathology in the Office of In Vitro Diagnostic Devices and Radiological Health, at Center for Devices and Radiologic Health at the FDA.  At the FDA, she has been involved in many diverse activities including premarket clearance/approval, manufacturer assistance, and post market regulatory compliance actions. In addition, she has been an ongoing participant in FDA multi-center reviews in companion diagnostics/ complementary diagnostics, and actively working to develop regulatory framework for liquid biopsy tests and NGS based oncology assays. 

Prior to joining the FDA, Dr. Philip’s experience included 3 years in the US biotechnology industry and postdoctoral training in Molecular Biology.  Dr. Philip received her Ph.D. from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.



Speaker
Workshop
"The breast tumor microenvironment: Clinical implications for checkpoint inhibitors"

Kornelia Polyak, MD, PhD
Professor of Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Kornelia Polyak, MD, PhD, is a professor of medicine at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School and is an internationally recognized leader of the breast cancer field. Dr. Polyak received her doctor of medicine degree from Albert Szent-Gyorgyi Medical University, Szeged, Hungary and her doctorate from Cornell University/Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute. She completed her postdoctoral training in cancer genetics in the laboratories of Drs. Bert Vogelstein and Kenneth Kinzler at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center, Baltimore, Maryland. She joined the faculty of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School in 1998 as assistant professor and was promoted to professor in 2011. 

Research in Dr. Polyak's laboratory is dedicated to the molecular analysis of human breast cancer with the goal of identifying differences between normal and cancerous breast tissue, determine their consequences, and use this information to improve the clinical management of breast cancer patients. Her lab has devoted much effort to develop new ways to study tumors as a whole and to apply interdisciplinary approaches. Using these methods, Dr. Polyak's lab has been at the forefront of studies analyzing purified cell populations from normal and neoplastic human breast tissue at genomic scale and in situ at single cell level and applying mathematical and ecological models for the better understanding of breast tumor evolution. She has also been successful with the clinical translation in her findings, including the testing of efficacy of JAK and BET bromodomain inhibitors for the treatment of triple negative breast cancer in clinical trials. 

Dr. Polyak has received numerous awards including the Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research in 2011 and the 2012 AACR Outstanding Investigator Award for Breast Cancer Research. She has served on numerous AACR committees including the AACR Board of Directors 2010-2013.



Discussant

Spotlight  Session 3 Next Steps in HER2+ Targeted Therapy

Aleix Prat, MD, PhD
Head Medical Oncology Department
Hospital Clinic of Barcelona

Dr. Aleix Prat is currently the Head of the Medical Oncology of Hospital Clínic of Barcelona (Spain), Associate Professor of the University of Barcelona and the Head of the Translational Genomics and Targeted Therapeutics in Solid Tumors Group at August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS). He obtained his MD degree in 2003 from the University of Barcelona and completed a medical oncology fellowship in 2008 at Vall d´Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO). In 2008, Dr. Prat became a postdoctoral research associate at the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA) in the Laboratory of Prof. Charles M. Perou. In 2012, he returned to Barcelona as the Head of the Translational Genomics Group at VHIO and more recently, he moved to Hospital Clínic and IDIBAPS. 

Dr. Prat is a clinical scientist with a longstanding research interest in the clinical application of laboratory findings in breast cancer, with a particular interest in gene expression and the clinical implications of different intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer. He designs and leads clinical trials of novel drugs and approaches, and is currently the scientific coordinator of SOLTI, a Spanish breast cancer cooperative group. Recently he has been recently named as a Member of Executive Committee of the The Breast International Group (BIG), an international non-profit organization that includes more than 56 cooperative groups from around the world, more than 10,000 experts and it is linked to more than 3,000 hospitals. Its main goal is to promote clinical and translational research in breast cancer. Dr. Prat received the International Prize for Breast Cancer Research (Padova, Italy) for his scientific discoveries regarding the characterization and clinical value of the intrinsic subtypes. Since 2007, he has actively taken part in a total of 110 publications (H-score of 33), with a total of 5,486 citations and 45 communications in international congresses. Finally, Dr. Prat has received competitive funding from different sources including Susan Komen Foundation, Breast Cancer Research Foundation and the Spanish Ministry of Health.



Moderator

Educational Session
"Managing Lymphedema in 2018: Can We Forgo The Sleeve?"

Bhuvaneswari Ramaswamy, MBBS, MRCP
Associate Professor of Internal Medicine
The Ohio State University

Bhuvaneswari Ramaswamy, MD, Associate Professor in the Division of Medical Oncology at The Ohio State University, is a breast cancer specialist and researcher at the Stefanie Spielman Comprehensive Breast Center. She is the Section Chief of Breast Medical Oncology and is the Chair of the Clinical Scientific Review Committee. Dr. Ramaswamy was recently named as one of the top 27 breast oncologists in the nation by The Forbes. She is a physician-scientist and is very active in clinical and translational research in breast cancer. She is a principal investigator for several cooperative group and Investigator-initiated studies, and has authored more than 50 peer-reviewed articles published in scientific journals. One of her research focus is addressing breast cancer disparities and her lab is working to identify the link between breastfeeding and triple negative breast cancer. Other research focus includes investigating the biology of breast tumors at the molecular level to identify characteristics of tumors that are resistant to hormone-based therapeutics, such as tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. With this information, researchers can develop alternative therapies to treat hormone-resistant tumors. Dr. Ramaswamy also is a member of the OSUCCC Translational Therapeutics Program and she directs the Medical Oncology Fellowship Program in Breast Cancer for the College of Medicine.



Panelist
Special Session
"View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?"

Meredith Regan, ScD
Associate Professor
Dana-Farber Cancer Insitute
International Breast Cancer Study Group

Dr. Regan is Associate Professor, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Harvard Medical School. She received her doctorate in biostatistics from the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health. She is Group Statistician and Director of the Statistical and Data Management Center for the International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) and Director of the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core for the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center Breast Cancer SPORE. She serves on the NCI Breast Cancer Steering Committee, the EBCTCG Steering Committee, and St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference Scientific Committee.



Discussant

Spotlight Session 2 Biomarkers in Clinical Trials

Andrea L. Richardson, MD, PhD
Director of Pathology, National Capital Region
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Dr. Richardson received her pathology residency training at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston MA and completed a fellowship in breast pathology.  She practiced breast pathology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute for 18 years.  In 2015, she became Director of Pathology and Director of Breast Pathology at Johns Hopkins Medicine, National Capital Region, Washington, DC. In addition to clinical practice, she is also a translational breast cancer scientist with many publications in breast cancer classification and molecular pathology.



Speaker

Educational Session
"Advanced HER2-positive breast cancer: Overcoming treatment resistance"

Moderator
Educational Session
"Twenty Years of Targeting HER2: Where Are We Now?"

Moderator
Case Discussion 1&2

Mothaffar F. Rimawi, MD, MBBS
Executive Medical Director of the Cancer Center
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Rimawi is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Medical Director of the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center as well as co-Leader of the Breast Cancer Research program of the Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center (DLDCCC) at Baylor College of Medicine.

He received his medical degree from the University of Jordan School of Medicine and completed his training in Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, and Breast Oncology at Baylor College of Medicine.His research is focused on designing and conducting biologically driven clinical trials to translate laboratory findings into new clinical treatments, and studying biomarkers of response and resistance. This will help elucidate mechanisms of therapeutic resistance to design more tailored treatment approaches, and to identify a treatment de-escalation strategy to spare patients unnecessary toxicity and cost when possible, without compromising outcomes. Dr. Rimawi has designed, led, and reported multiple biologically-driven national and international trials in breast cancer with special focus on translational work in HER2+ and in ER+ breast cancer.

He serves on multiple national clinical research leadership committees including the Breast Committee of the NRG Oncology Group and is co-Chair of the HER2 Working group of the Translational Breast Cancer Symposium (TBCRC).



Discussant

Spotlight Session 6 QOL, Survivorship, and Cost of Care

Kathryn J. Ruddy, MD, MPH
Associate Professor of Oncology
Mayo Clinic

Dr. Ruddy completed her internship and residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and her fellowship in Medical Oncology and Hematology at Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Care in Boston, MA. She then earned a Master’s in Public Health at Harvard School of Public Health and worked as a breast medical oncologist at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Dr. Ruddy is now an Associate Professor of Oncology and the Director of Cancer Survivorship for the Department of Oncology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN.  She is an active member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Survivorship Guidelines Committee, and she co-leads the Patient-Reported Outcomes Interest Group in the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC).  In the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology, she is a vice chair of the Symptom Intervention (SI) Committee, the liaison between the SI and Breast Committees, and a member of the Health Outcomes Committee and the Cancer Care Delivery Research Committee.  As a clinician, she cares for patients with breast cancer. As a clinical researcher, she is primarily focused on understanding and addressing the needs of cancer survivors. 



Chair
Spotlight Session 5 Immunotherapy

Panelist
Special Session
"View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?"

Hope S. Rugo, MD
Professor of Medicine
University of California San Francisco
Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

Hope S. Rugo, MD, is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology and Oncology at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, where she is also the Director, Breast Oncology and Clinical Trials Education. In addition, Dr. Rugo is a member of the ALLIANCE Breast Committee and the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium, is the UCSF representative to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Guidelines Committee, serves on several committees for the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and is a voting member of the Advanced Breast Cancer Guidelines Consortium.

With a summa cum laude undergraduate degree from Tufts University, Dr. Rugo received her medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. She then completed both a residency in internal medicine and fellowship in hematology and oncology at UCSF. Dr. Rugo then capped off her formal education with the completion of a 2-year postdoctoral fellowship in immunology at Stanford University.

An active researcher, Dr. Rugo has published many peer-reviewed papers and given presentations on a variety of breast cancer and supportive care-related topics. She is also an investigator and chair of the Safety Committee for the national multicenter ISPY2 trial, and is the principal investigator of a number of clinical trials. Her research interests include novel therapies for advanced breast cancer, immune modulation to restore chemotherapy sensitivity, evaluation of circulating cells as novel markers of response and resistance to therapy, neoadjuvant therapy, and supportive care. Dr. Rugo is the recipient of a Komen Promise Award, receives funding from the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, the 2010 recipient of the Cancer Care Physician of the Year Award, and is a fellow of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. She is on the Steering Committees for several international clinical trials.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 8: What's New in Loco-Regional Therapy

Emiel Rutgers, MD, PhD, FRCS
Surgeon
Netherlands Cancer Institute

PROF DR RUTGERS (1955) is a Surgical Oncologist at the Netherlands Cancer Institute in Amsterdam, previous Head of the Department of Surgery and Professor in Surgical Oncology at the Medical Faculty of the University of Amsterdam. He earned his PhD degree in 1986 at the University of Amsterdam on a thesis investigating the value of follow up of women treated for breast cancer. Prof Rutgers is fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons (London & Glasgow). He is chair of the Eurepean Breast Cancer Council (organising the biannual Eurpean Breast Cancer Conference).Prof Rutgers’ main field of interest is breast cancer, with emphasis on prognostic and predictive factors (micro-array techniques), risk management and prevention, and optimalisation of surgical procedures including neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, sentinel node procedure and immediate breast reconstruction, with the overall theme to reduce side effects in breast cancer treatment by carefully de-escalating surgery and otber treatment modalities. He is the author or co-author of about 400 articles and book chapters on different aspects of breast cancer. Prof. Rutgers is the principal investigator of the EORTC-AMAROS Trial (in sentinel node biopsy in breast cancer) and the EORTC MINDACT Trial, which is studying the value the 70-gene micro-array Mammaprint test in node negative and positive breast cancer. In 2017 he received the ECCO Clinical Research Award.

He served SABCS for the past three years as abstract reviewer. In 2007 he presented an invited plenary lecture.



Discussant
Spotlight Session 5 Immunotherapy

Roberto Salgado, MD
Pathologist
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre

I am board certified in Anatomical Pathology since 2006, and had my medical training at the University Hospital of Antwerp (Belgium) and the University Hospital in Leiden (The Netherlands).A PhD-thesis was obtained working with the Translational Cancer Research Group of the AZ Sint-Augustinus Hospital/Antwerp and at the Department of Pathology at the University Hospital of Antwerp, studying the interactions of hemostasis and angiogenesis in breast cancer. My training in Anatomic Pathology and Molecular Pathology took place at the University Hospital Antwerp, the University Hospital Leuven and at the Institut Jules Bordet, all in Belgium. After my graduation as an Anatomical Pathologist I worked as a consultant Pathologist for the Breast International Group (BIG), and as a member of the Aurora Working Group helped develop the Aurora Molecular Screening Program for Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients. I was also a member of the Aurora Molecular Advisory Board of the Breast International Group. Currently, I do surgical pathology at the Department of Pathology in GZA/ZNA Antwerp. I am a scientific collaborator of the Immuno-Task Force of the Breast International Group and an Honorary Research Fellow at the Division of Research at the Peter Mac Callum Cancer Center, Melbourne, Australia. Currently I am chairing an International Consortium of Pathologists, namely the “International Immuno- Oncology Biomarkers Working Group” (www.tilsinbreastcancer.org) that develops guidelines for the assessment of Immuno-Oncological Biomarkers in cancer. I work in close collaboration with the EORTC, of where I am an active member of the Pathobiology Group actively involved in developing the European Union wide SPECTAconcept, which is an initiative quite similar to the NCI MATCH. My strategic views on Oncology have been published in major international high impact factor journals including Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology, Nature Reviews Drug Discovery and Lancet Oncology. I have also co-developed major internal EORTC -policies and - documents on criteria for evaluating/auditing biobanking and molecular laboratories willing to work with EORTC. In addition, I am an auditor on Molecular Pathology/Genetic laboratories for the Federal Belgian Government. Considering all the above, I have developed a specific expertise in the Molecular Pathology of solid tumours, circulating tumor biomarkers, next generation sequencing technologies, validation of biomarkers, innovative clinical trials incorporating genomics, quality assurance of genomic technologies and development of biomarkers in immunotherapeutic trials, with a focus on Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TILs).



Speaker

Translational Science Forum
"Clinical development of inhibitors of the P13K pathway"

Cristina Saura Manich, MD, PhD
Head, Breast Cancer Unit
Vall d'Hebron University Hospital

Dr. Cristina Saura Manich is currently the Head of the Breast Cancer Unit at the Vall d’Hebron University Hospital, where she has been working since 2007. To pursue her interests in clinical research, she joined the Program in Clinical Effectiveness at the Harvard School of Public Health in 2007. She obtained her PhD from the Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona in 2017 under the title “Treatment of Breast Cancer diagnosed during pregnancy” with cum laude qualification.

Dr. Saura Manich is actively involved in developing various international studies involving drugs directed against molecular targets in Breast Cancer. She is especially dedicated to advancing precision oncology and has become a reference in the development of different PI3K inhibitors and anti-HER2 therapies. 



Speaker
Educational Session
"Breast cancer’s metastatic moment: How postpartum tissue involution facilitates progression"

Pepper J. Schedin, PhD
Professor
Oregon Health and Science University

Dr. Schedin's research program investigates windows of mammary gland remodeling during normal breast development and how these physiologic remodeling windows confer hot spots of risk for breast cancer development and progression. Their goal is to understand how physiologic signals modulate pro-tumorigenic epithelial-stromal interactions and use this knowledge to develop breast cancer therapeutic and chemoprevention strategies targeted to these developmental windows. Her lab is at the forefront of investigating the normal mammary tissue microenvironment and has shown that mammary stroma is highly plastic, remodeling in response to various physiologic signals including pregnancy, lactation, menopause and diet. They have found that the inherent plasticity of normal breast stroma contributes significantly to breast cancer risk and outcomes, but also provides unique opportunities for life-cycle specific breast cancer prevention and treatment strategies.  



Moderator

Educational Session
"Translational Insights in Estrogen Receptor Signaling and Endocrine Resistance - Bench to Bedside"

Rachel Schiff, PhD
Associate Professor
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Schiff is an Associate Professor at the Baylor College of Medicine, Lester & Sue Smith Breast Center and the Departments of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology. She is an internationally recognized expert in breast cancer translational research and in preclinical therapeutic models, especially concerning endocrine, HER2, and additional targeted therapies. Dr. Schiff received her PhD from Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School in Jerusalem and completed her post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio. Dr. Schiffs research focuses on understanding the key signaling pathways in breast cancer and on identifying therapeutic strategies  to  overcome  them.  

Her  major  research  interests  include molecular aspects of HER2 and estrogen receptor (ER) and their function in breast cancer, the crosstalk between the ER signaling network and growth factor receptors and cellular kinase pathways, the role of ER co-regulators and pioneer factors in breast cancer development and progression, mechanisms of resistance to endocrine and HER2-targeted therapies, and the identification of genomic and epigenomic alterations, transcriptional signatures, and biomarkers of hormonal and anti-HER2 therapy resistance for tailored therapeutic interventions. 

Dr. Schiff's research is partly supported by grants from the National Cancer Institute, The Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, and the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program. Dr. Schiff has co-authored over 100 peer-reviewed manuscripts and several book chapters in key textbooks in the breast cancer field.



Speaker
Educational Session
"BRCA1/2/3 and p53 in replication fork stability"

Katharina Schlacher, PhD
Assistant Professor

UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Katharina Schlacher, PhD is an Assistant Professor, Department of Cancer Biology, Division of Basic Science Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. She received her PhD from the University of Southern California   

Her research program focuses on understanding replication fork protection, which likely is a novel tumor and disease suppression pathway. Specifically, they have recently discovered a new pathway for DNA replication fork protection involving breast cancer and Fanconi Anemia tumor susceptibility genes distinct from DNA repair, which suppresses genomic instability by stabilizing RAD51 filaments to protect against nucleolytic degradation of stalled replication forks. With a now growing list of known tumor suppressors protecting nascent DNA strands, their research is set out to obtain key knowledge on the role of this new pathway in patient tumor cells, during transcription and in metabolism to eventually devise effective treatment strategies.



Speaker
Educational Session
"What is a HER2-positive in breast cancer in 2018?"

Stuart J. Schnitt, MD
Chief of Breast Oncologic Pathology
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Stuart J. Schnitt, M.D. is the Chief of Breast Oncologic Pathology for the Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, Associate Director of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women’s Hospital Breast Oncology Program, co-leader of the Dana Farber Harvard Cancer Center Breast Program, Senior Pathologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, a Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School and an internationally recognized expert in breast pathology.   

Dr. Schnitt did his internship and residency in Anatomic and Clinical Pathology at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston followed by a fellowship in surgical pathology, also at Beth Israel Hospital. He was a faculty member in the Beth Israel Hospital/Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Department of Pathology from 1984-2017, including 11 years as Director of Anatomic Pathology and subsequently Vice Chair for Anatomic Pathology.  He has published over 340 original articles, review articles, editorials, commentaries, and book chapters, primarily in the area of breast diseases. He has authored a popular breast pathology textbook entitled “Biopsy Interpretation of the Breast”, now its third edition. The first two editions of this book were also published in Chinese. In addition, he is one of the editors of the 4th Edition of the “World Health Organization Classification of Tumours of the Breast”, published in 2012.   

Dr. Schnitt is a Past President of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology (2010-2011). Other notable honors include the Arthur Purdy Stout Society of Surgical Pathologists Annual Prize (1999), the Albany Medical College Distinguished Alumnus award (2014), the Lynn Sage Distinguished Lecturer (2014) and the Maude Abbot Lecture at the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology Annual Meeting (2016). He is particularly proud to have been involved in the training of 35 breast pathology fellows since 1995. He has lectured extensively around the world. His research interests and contributions to our understanding of benign breast diseases and breast cancer have been broad, but have largely focused on risk factors for local recurrence in patients with invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ treated with breast conserving therapy, benign breast disease and breast cancer risk, and stromal-epithelial interactions in breast tumor progression.



Panelist
Special Session
"View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?"

Bárbara Segarra-Vázquez, DHSc
Dean
University of Puerto Rico
Medical Sciences Campus

Barbara Segarra-Vazquez, DHSc, is dean of the School of Health Professions at the Medical Sciences Campus of the University of Puerto Rico. She also directs the Post-Doctoral Master in Clinical and Translational Research Program and the Clinical Laboratory Sciences Program at the university. She has deep experience in clinical research and cancer trials through organizations such as the Department of Defense, the American Association of Cancer Research, Susan G. Komen, and the Puerto Rico Cancer Control Commission. 

She is a Spanish speaker, and has an interest in addressing minority health disparities. 



Speaker
Year in Review
"Early stage breast cancer, Year in Review: Evolving paradigms"

Priyanka Sharma, MD
Associate Professor
University of Kansas Medical Center

Dr. Priyanka Sharma is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Kansas Medical Center and assistant director of clinical research at the University of Kansas Cancer Center. She is also the institutional principal investigator for National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) trials. 

Dr. Sharma received her medical degree from MS University of Baroda, India and proceeded to complete Internal Medicine residency, chief residency, and Hematology-Oncology fellowship at the University of Kansas Medical Center.  Her research interests include clinical and translational research in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) and hereditary breast cancer. She is recipient of American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Advanced Clinical Research Award (2015-2018). 

She is principle investigator of several ongoing clinical trials with targeted agents. Dr. Sharma is Vice-Chair of the South West Oncology Group (SWOG) Breast Committee, member of SWOG Board of Governors and member of ASCO Scientific program committee. 



Speaker
William L. McGuire Memorial Lecture
"Hold That Scalpel! Using the Tumor to Determine the Treatment"

Ian E. Smith, MD, FRCP, FRCPE
Consultant Medical Oncologist
The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust

Ian E. Smith, MD, FRCP, FRCPE, is Professor of Cancer Medicine at The Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, London, United Kingdom. His initial medical training was in Edinburgh and then he came to the Royal Marsden, London, for specialist training in cancer medicine. He also spent some time in Boston at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard.   Over the years his principal clinical research interests have been in novel approaches to the treatment of breast cancer and, in his earlier years, lung cancer. He was involved in the early clinical development of several anticancer drugs that have subsequently proved effective in the clinic, including in particular letrozole and carboplatin.  In recent years he has become increasingly involved in neoadjuvant and short-duration preoperative therapies as a research approach towards individualised treatments for breast cancer. He has been Chief Investigator or UK Principal Investigator for several international multicentre breast cancer trials, including currently the UK POETIC trial, the largest of its kind in the world, aiming to individualise adjuvant therapy for women with estrogen receptor-positive early breast cancer.  He publishes extensively and is regularly invited to lecture on breast cancer around the world, including Visiting Professor at Ann Arbor University, Michigan last year.  He was awarded the Susan G Komen for the Cure Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction at the 2009 San Antonio International Breast Cancer Conference.

Professor Smith was appointed first chairman of the UK Breast Trials Intergroup and has also been chairman of the British Breast Group. He has been the Scientific Chairman of the Breast Section of  ESMO, and he has also chaired several national professional bodies including the Association of Cancer Physicians, the Royal College of Physicians Specialist Advisory Committee for Medical Oncology, and the NCRI Lung Cancer Clinical Studies Group.   He is was recently Co –Chairman of the ASCO Clinical Guidelines Group  for Chemotherapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer, and he is the first Chair of the recently formed national Breast Cancer Clinical Expert  Group, whose role is to advise the NHS on best  treatments for Breast Cancer.  He is a Patron of Breast Cancer Care, the largest UK breast charity for patient support, and a Trustee of Breast Cancer Haven, another major patient support charity.



Moderator
General Session 1

Christos Sotiriou, MD, PhD
Head of Breast Cancer Translational Research Laboratory
Institut Jules Bordet

The BCTL headed by Prof Sotiriou is an academic laboratory from the faculty of Medicine of the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) located at the Jules Bordet Institute (IJB). The main research focus of the laboratory consists in developing prognostic and predictive biomarkers for breast cancer (BC) as well as improving the molecular understanding of breast cancer biology, disease dissemination and progression using state-of-the art “omics” technologies. The ultimate goal of this laboratory is to accelerate the translation of basic science discoveries dedicated to breast cancer into the clinic. The BCTL group, composed of 20 persons, is a well-diversified multidisciplinary team integrating translational research post-docs, clinical research fellows, bioinformatic and wet lab PhD students as well as laboratory technicians allowing a combined understanding of breast cancer biology and up-to-date knowledge of clinical practice. The group has extensive cutting edge bioinformatic expertise in analyzing genome-wide expression and SNP array data, whole genome, whole exome, targeted and RNA sequencing data from formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) and frozen tissue samples as well as from whole blood and plasma samples.



Discussant
General Session 2

Joseph Sparano, MD
Associate Chairman, Department of Oncology
Montefiore Medical Center

Dr. Sparano is a medical oncologist and clinical researcher who specializes in breast cancer. He serves as a member of the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium® Program Planning Committee



Speaker
Educational Session
"Brain metastases of breast cancer"

Patricia S. Steeg, PhD
Senior Investigator
National Cancer Institute



Speaker
Educational Session
"Does breast cancer prevention need an 18th amendment? New evidence on alcohol and breast cancer"

Mary Beth Terry, PhD
Professor of Epidemiology
Columbia University

Dr. Mary Beth Terry's research focuses on environmental and lifestyle modifiers of underlying breast cancer susceptibility.  After completing her PhD in Epidemiology at Columbia, she has worked for over 18 years leading molecular epidemiologic studies focusing on the role of environmental exposures during windows of breast cancer susceptibility and has conducted population-based and family-based studies of the role of alcohol in altering breast cancer risk.  

She currently leads Columbia's Breast Cancer and Environment Research Program (BCERP) study, the New York site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry and the LEGACY Girls Study.   Dr. Terry teaches advanced epidemiology to graduate students and medical fellows.



Speaker
Educational Session
"PI3K in breast cancer, glutamine changes and methionine addiction"

Alex Toker, PhD
Professor 
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Alex Toker, PhD is the chief of the Division of Signal Transduction in the Department of Pathology, the Department of Medicine, and the Cancer Center (CC) at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC). He is also the deputy director forinternational affairs in the CC and Cancer Research Institute (CRI) at BIDMC, a professor of pathology at Harvard Medical School (HMS), and an investigator at the Ludwig Center at Harvard.

Dr. Toker earned his undergraduate degree from King’s College at the University of London and his Ph.D. from the National Institute for Medical Research also in London. He conducted postdoctoral research in the Department of Physiology at Tufts University School of Medicine,in the Department of Cell Biology at HMS, and in the Division of Signal Transduction at BIDMC. His first faculty appointment was as a staff scientist at the Boston Biomedical Research Institute. Dr. Toker joined the faculty of BIDMC and HMS as an assistant professor in 2000, and in 2014, became chief of the Division of Signal Transduction. In 2015, he was appointed director of the Signal Transduction Program in the CC and the CRI, and in 2017 became the deputy director for international affairs in the CC and the CRI.

Dr. Toker has established a discovery-based research program at BIDMC that focuses on the cell and molecular biology of cancer, with special emphasis on genes that contribute to malignancy in breast cancer. His lab investigates the mechanisms by which signaling pathways impact tumor cell survival, invasion, and metastasis. They also study metabolic alterations in tumor cells and how these lead to vulnerabilities that can be used to target tumors with specific therapies. Recent discoveries have also focused on deciphering the mechanisms of resistance to both standard of care chemotherapies and small molecular targeted therapies that are under clinical development and to design more optimal combination strategies to circumvent the resistance to drugs that is invariably seen in the clinic. The ultimate goal is to decipher the complex mechanisms by which these pathways impact cancer progression and to develop drugs and therapeutic strategies that can be used in patients with a variety of cancers.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Multidisciplinary management of breast cancer brain metastases"

Christina I. Tsien, MD
Professor of Radiation Oncology
Washington University 

Christina Tsien, MD, FRCP, is a professor of radiation oncology for the department of radiation oncology at Washington University School of Medicine, located in St. Louis, Missouri. In addition to her professional work, Dr. Tsien is also an active member of several professional societies, such as the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Society of Neuro-Oncology,  National Cancer Center Network, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology.  

Dr. Tsien received her medical degree from McGill University Faculty of Medicine located in Montreal, Canada. She then went on to complete her residency in radiation oncology at McGill University Health Center as well as a fellowship at the University of Michigan. 



Speaker
Workshop
"Circulating tumor DNA analysis to elucidate drug action & resistance"

Nicholas Turner, PhD, FRCP
Consultant Medical Oncologist
The Royal Marsden Hospital

Dr Nicholas Turner is a Consultant Medical Oncologist who specialises in the treatment of breast cancer. Dr Turner read Natural Sciences at Cambridge University before qualifying in 1997 from the University of Oxford Medical School. After completing general medical training in London, he trained in medical oncology at Royal Free and University College Hospitals and completed a PhD at The Institute of Cancer Research in 2006. He joined the Breast Unit of The Royal Marsden as a Consultant in Medical Oncology in 2008. 

He is a Team Leader in Molecular Oncology at the Breast Cancer Now Research Centre at the Institute of Cancer Research, London. He is Breast Theme Lead for The Royal Marsden NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, and a member of the NCRI Breast Cancer Clinical Studies Group. He is the Breast Domain Lead of the Genomics England Clinical Interpretation Partnerships. He sits on the organising committees of many international conferences on breast cancer, was the executive chair of the IMPAKT 2015 breast cancer conference, and is a scientific editor of the journal Cancer Discovery.

Dr Nicholas Turner is Chief Investigator of a number of national and international trials of precision therapy in breast cancer. His research interests include the development of new therapies for breast cancer and using liquid biopsies to deliver more precise treatment for breast cancer.



Speaker
Year in Review
"Translational research"

Andrew Tutt, FRCR, PhD
Head of the Division of Breast Cancer Research
The Institute of Cancer Research

Andrew Tutt qualified in Medicine in 1990. After postgraduate training in General Medicine, he trained in Clinical Oncology at the Royal Marsden Hospital, before gaining a Doctoral Research Training Fellowship from the Medical Research Council, to work in Professor Alan Ashworth’s laboratory at The Institute of Cancer Research.  

Here he worked on the then unknown DNA repair functions of the BRCA2 breast cancer predisposition gene, and described the role of BRCA2 in homologous recombination (HR). He was awarded his PhD in 2002. In his postdoctoral work as a Clinician Scientist, he identified the synthetic lethality between PARP inhibitors and BRCA1/2 mutations with Dr Chris Lord and Professor Alan Ashworth.

He went on to design the Single Agent Proof of Concept Phase I trials and associated DNA repair biomarker studies with the ICR and Royal Marsden Drug Development Unit, and has since lead international Phase II and III trials, examining the role of HR directed therapies, including PARP inhibitors and platinums for BRCA1 / BRCA2 deficiency associated malignancy, including the TNT trial.

He cares for women with breast cancer as a Consultant Oncologist, and as a member of  the multidisciplinary Breast Units at Guy’s and St Thomas’ and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trusts. Andrew is also a member of the St Gallen Early Breast Cancer International Consensus Panel and the Oxford Early Breast Cancer Trialists Cooperative Group (EBCTCG).

He is Professor of Breast Oncology and Director of the Breast Cancer Now Toby Robins Research Centre, at the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) and Kings College London, and Head of the Division of Breast Cancer Research and ICR.

Andrew leads a clinical trial programme focusing on TNBC and cancers associated with functional deficiencies in BRCA1 and BRCA2. He also leads translational laboratories at both the ICR and KCL, studying BRCA1 and BRCA2 associated and Triple Negative forms of Breast Cancer (TNBC).  Their recent work included, a new TNBC targets, PIM1 and KIFCI, published in Nature Medicine and Nature Communications.

Andrew’s group have also published papers from these programmes in the journals Nature, The New England Journal of Medicine, The Lancet, Nature Medicine, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Cancer Research, Science Translational Medicine and Cancer Discovery. He is Chief Investigator for the recently reported multicentre UKCRN ”Triple Negative Trial” and is Global Study Chair of the ‘OlympiA’ study – an adjuvant PARP inhibitor trial in patients with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and breast cancer. 

He has been a visiting Professor at British Columbia Cancer Agency, and Jean Lubrano visiting Scholar at Harvard Medical School. He recently received the Addarii Award for his work in the field of BRCA1 and BRCA2 associated breast and ovarian cancer research.



Moderator
Educational Session
"BRCA 1/2: Beyond DNA Repair"

Ratna K. Vadlamudi, PhD
Professor
UT Health San Antonio

Dr. Ratna K. Vadlamudi has training in molecular biology, endocrinology, breast cancer biology, and has significant experience in using pre-clinical models for testing of biologic, small molecule and endocrine agents.  As a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School/DFCI and as a junior faculty at UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, he has acquired significant experience relating to breast cancer molecular research methods. As a PI on several university- and NIH-funded grants, he expanded his research to include pre-clinical models and Tg-mouse models for research into estrogen and breast cancer signaling. His current research interests include characterizing the molecular mechanisms of estrogen signaling in breast cancer progression and to develop next generation anti-estrogen compounds. 

During this time, Dr. Vadlamudi has served as PI of several NIH, CPRIT, DOD-BCRP  and Komen foundation grants and served in several study sections including NIH.  He has been continuously attending SABCS meeting for the past 16 years, has given three oral presentations of his research during this period, presented several posters, served as an abstract reviewer for three years and as a planning committee member in 2017. During his tenure as a faculty, he successfully trained 20 pre/post-doctoral fellows, 4 clinical fellows, 12 BS/MD students as primary mentor and served as dissertation committee member for an additional 21 doctoral students. His past training, breast cancer cancer research experience, qualifications makes him particularly well-suited to participate as a member of the SABCS planning committee.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Linking cancer pathogenesis to emerging functions of the BRCA proteins beyond DNA repair"

Ashok Venkitaraman, PhD
Professor & Director 
MRC Cancer Unit
University of Cambridge

Ashok Venkitaraman is the Ursula Zoellner Professor of Cancer Research at the University of Cambridge, and the Director of the Medical Research Council (MRC) Cancer Unit there. He trained in clinical medicine at the Christian Medical College, Vellore, before completing his PhD at University College, London, and his post-doctoral work at the Medical Research Council's Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge. His first faculty appointment was also in the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, and he remained there as a faculty member until his election as the inaugural holder of the Zoellner Professorship.   

Ashok is recognized for his discoveries advancing our understanding of how genes that maintain chromosome structure and number suppress human cancer. His work helps explain how inherited mutations affecting such genes - particularly the breast cancer gene, BRCA2 - predispose to cancer, and provides scientific foundations for new therapies, by illuminating the fundamental mechanisms that control chromosome repair, duplication and segregation.   

Ashok was inducted as a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences, London, in 2001, and as a member of the EMBO European academy, Heidelberg, in 2004. His numerous scientific awards and honours include the 2017 Sasser Global Prize.



Speaker
Educational Session
"Techniques and technical considerations"

Frank A. Vicini, MD, FACR, FABS, FASTRO
Physician, National Director of Breast Care Services
MHP Radiation Oncology Institute

Dr. Vicini has held multiple academic appointments and been involved in numerous clinical studies involving breast and prostate cancer. He has designed and developed numerous phase 1/11 trials to evaluate low-dose and high-dose rate brachy therapy as the sole method of treatment for selected patients with Stage I & II breast carcinomas. Dr. Vicini has authored over 350 peer-reviewed articles and p[resented his research at national and international meetings. He is a visiting professor in both the United States and Europe, authored multiple chapters in textbooks and is on the editorial board of several oncology journals. In addition, he is listed as one of the few oncologists in "Best Oncology Doctors in America". Dr. Vicini was recently named the National Principal Investigator for 21st Century Oncology A division of MHP.



Discussant
General Session 1

Nikhil Wagle, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute 

 Nikhil Wagle is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, a medical oncologist at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and an associate member of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. He is the Deputy Director of the Center for Cancer Precision Medicine at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. He received his MD from Harvard Medical and completed his residency training in internal medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, where he also served as chief medical resident, and completed his fellowship training in hematology/oncology in the Dana-Farber/Partners program. 

Dr. Wagle leads a translational research program in the field of breast cancer genomics and precision (or “personalized”) cancer medicine. The major goals of his work are to better understand the biology of metastatic breast cancer and to develop new ways to overcome or prevent drug resistance in patients with advanced breast cancer. Ultimately, his research aims to identify characteristics of tumors that might improve clinical decision-making for patients with advanced cancer. 

He also leads The Metastatic Breast Cancer Project (mbcproject.org), a nationwide direct-to-patient research initiative that engages patients with advanced breast cancer through social media and seeks to empower them to accelerate cancer research through sharing their samples and clinical information. The project’s outreach program, developed in collaboration with advocacy organizations and patients, serves to connect thousands of patients around the U.S. with metastatic breast cancer research, allowing them to participate regardless of where they live.



Speaker
AACR Distinguished Lectureship in Breast Cancer Research
"What Can We Learn from Breast Cancers that Metastasize or Don't?

Zena Werb, PhD
Professor of Anatomy
University of California San Francisco

Dr. Zena Werb received her B.Sc. in Biochemistry from the University of Toronto, and her Ph.D. in Cell Biology from Rockefeller University, New York. After postdoctoral studies at the Strangeways Research Laboratory in Cambridge England, she was recruited to the University of California San Francisco faculty, where she is currently Professor of Anatomy and Associate Director for Basic Science, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Werb is recognized internationally for her fundamental discoveries about the role of matrix metalloproteinases, the cellular microenvironment and intercellular communication in the normal functioning and pathogenesis of tissues, in particular, breast cancer. She has published over 450 papers.  Her honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship, the E. B. Wilson Medal, American Society for Cell Biology and the UCSF Lifetime Achievement in Mentoring Award, and election to the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She served on the Board of Directors of AACR and numerous boards of directors. She has trained >75 graduate students and postdocs. She created the groundwork for the field of cell biology of extracellular proteolysis, including discovery of  cellular sources for MMPs,  endogenous inhibitors regulate MMPs, the existence of multiple TIMPs, and discovery and cloning of MMPs. She discovered a mechanism for a proteolytic cascade involved in tissue remodeling. She used MMP mutant mice to probe development and neoplasia, laying out the conceptual framework for the extracellular microenvironment as a stabilizer of cell behavior and of MMPs as provocateurs in altered behavior during invasive processes, both normal and in tumor progression.  She put forward the concept that MMPs are the key effectors of signaling in the pericellular environment.  She discovered that MMPs are critical regulators of migration and repopulation of hematopoietic, endothelial and and mesenchymal stem cells. She demonstrated that integrins were involved in signaling cascades, that several distinct signaling pathways were downstream of the same integrin, depending on cellular context and the concept that regulation of cell adhesion and cytoskeleton altered signaling cascades, gene transcription and apoptosis. These pathways are fundamentally involved in the tumor microenvironment and tumor cell behavior defined the stromal microenvironment in mammary development, tumor progression and metastasis. Her studies on mammary development and mammary stem cells led to new insights into mechanisms and the windows of susceptibility underlying breast cancer progression and metastasis



Speaker
Educational Session
"Treatment morbidity and quality of life considerations"

Timothy J. Whelan, BSc, MB, BCh, MSc, FRCPC
Associate Chair, Research
McMaster University

Dr. Whelan is a radiation oncologist at the Juravinski Cancer Centre as well as, Professor and Associate Chair of Research in the Department of Oncology, McMaster University, and a Canada Research Chair in Breast Cancer Research. He is co-Chair of the Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG) Breast Disease Site and lead investigator with the Ontario Clinical Oncology Group (OCOG). 

He has had extensive experience in designing and conducting multicentered radiotherapy (RT) trials in early breast cancer and has established an international network of investigators (radiation oncologists, surgeons, medical oncologists, molecular pathologists, and biostatisticians) in Canada, the United States, Australia and New Zealand. He has led practice changing trials of RT for breast cancer including the hypofractionation trial, the RAPID trial evaluating accelerated partial breast irradiation and more recently the MA.20 trial demonstrating that RT to the regional nodes following breast conserving surgery in women with node positive breast cancer reduced breast cancer recurrence.



Speaker
Susan G. Komen® Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction in Clinical Research
"The Challenge of Doing Less"

Moderator
Mini-Symposium
"Over and Under Treatment: Getting It Right For Each Patient"

Moderator
Special Session
"View From The Trenches - What Will You Do On Monday Morning?"

Eric P. Winer, MD
Chief, Division of Women's Cancers
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Eric P. Winer is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Chief of Women’s Cancers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.  He is also Director of the Breast Oncology Program and the Thompson Chair in Breast Cancer Research.  He divides his time between clinical work, clinical research, and administration.  Since he joined the Harvard faculty in 1997, he has mentored over 20 fellows and junior faculty, the vast majority of whom have gone on to assume positions in major cancer academic cancer centers.  Dr. Winer has been the co-chair of the Breast Committee for the Cancer and Leukemia Group B and the Alliance, but stepped down from that role in May, 2016.  He is the leader of the Dana-Farber/Harvard SPORE (Specialized Program in Research Excellence) in breast cancer.   

Finally, he has served as the Chief Scientific Advisor to Susan G. Komen for the Cure since 2007.  Broadly defined, the focus of his research has been on improving the clinical care of women with breast cancer.  He has approached this task with a collaborative spirit, and has worked closely with colleagues in basic science, translational medicine, biostatistics, health services research, clinical oncology, and psychosocial research.  Dr. Winer has conducted a wide array of Phase I, II, and III clinical trials in patients with breast cancer.  These trials have addressed all of the major biologic subtypes and all stages of the disease.  



Discussant
General Session 4

Wendy Ann Woodward, MD, PhD
Professor
UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Woodward is a Professor and the Chief of the Clinical Breast Radiotherapy Service in the Department of Radiation Oncology at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC). The MD Anderson Breast Radiotherapy Service represents decades of breast cancer expertise by ten radiation oncology clinicians, and a specialized team of breast radiotherapy nurses, physicists, therapists and dosimetrists. We treat all left sided and selected right-sided breast cancer using deep-inspiration breath hold to eliminate the heart from the radiation field. We offer every type of radiotherapy technology including proton therapy, always selected and personalized to each case. We are constantly working to improve radiotherapy for breast cancer and offer numerous clinical trial opportunities designed to make radiotherapy easier and more effective with fewer side effects. 

Dr. Woodward treats all types of breast cancer and is particularly interested in complex, locally advanced breast cancers including a rare type that presents suddenly as a swollen red breast, Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC). She is Deputy Director and Ad Interim Executive Director of the MDACC Inflammatory Breast Cancer clinic and Research Program. This program is dedicated to advancing the radiation treatment and biologic understanding of inflammatory breast cancer through laboratory, translational, and clinical research.  



Chair
Spotlight Session 7 Biology of Invasive Lobular and Endocrine Resistant Breast Cancer

Douglas Yee, MD
Director and Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology
Masonic Cancer Center
University of Minnesota

Dr. Yee is director of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota.  A professor in the Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, Dr. Yee holds the John H. Kersey Chair in Cancer Research.  He is internationally known for his laboratory research on the growth regulation of tumors by the insulin-like growth factors and the clinical translation of these findings.   Dr. Yee’s curriculum vitae includes well over 250 publications.  He also maintains an active clinical practice in breast medical oncology at the Breast Center, University of Minnesota Medical Center.

Dr. Yee graduated from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, earned his medical degree from the University of Chicago, and completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill and completed his fellowship in medical oncology at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, MD.  Before coming to the University of Minnesota, he held faculty positions in the Lombardi Cancer Center at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., and at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio. 



Speaker
Basic Science Forum
"New insights into early-stage bone colonization of disseminated breast cancer cells"

Xiang Zhang, PhD
Associate Professor
Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Xiang Zhang obtained his PhD degree from Columbia University in 2006, and did his postdoctoral training at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from 2006 to 2011. He was then recruited to the Breast Center of Baylor College of Medicine as a McNair Scholar, and is now a tenured associate professor. His lab focuses on metastatic breast cancer, and has made seminal contributions in two areas: 1) bone metastasis and 2) tumor immunology and immunotherapies. In the former, he discovered the osteogenic niche that promotes early-stage bone colonization (Wang et al., Cancer Cell), and invented a series of pre-clinical models and technologies to accelerate anti-metastasis drug discovery (Wang et al., Nature Communications). In the latter, he uncovered the link between oncogenic mTOR signaling and recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (Welte, et al., Nature Cell Biology) and a mutual regulatory loop between tumour vasculature and immunostimulatory reprogramming (Tian et al., Nature). These discoveries have made significant impacts in our understanding of tumor-microenvironment interactions and the consequent effects on therapies. 

Dr. Zhang is the first or corresponding author of 15 papers published in journals including Cell, Nature, Cancer Cell, Nature Cell Biology, Nature Communications, Genes and Development, PNAS, Genome Research and MCB. He also co-authored another 30 papers published in Cell, Nature, Cancer Cell, Nature Medicine and etc. He was the invited speakers of a number of international conferences including the Breast Cancer Think Tank (2012, 2014, and 2016), Gordon Conference on Bone and Teeth Biology (2014), Gordon Conference on Mammary Gland Biology (2010) and Advanced Breast Cancer First Consensus (2011). His awards include “Thesis with Distinction” by Columbia University (2006), the McNair Scholarship by Baylor College of Medicine (2011), Pathway to Independence Award by NCI (2010-2014), DoD BCRP Era of Hope Scholarship (2016), Excellent in Research Award of MCB, BCM (2016), Theresa Foundation Leadership Award (2016), and Susan G. Komen Career Catalyst Award (2014-2017). He is a co-director of the annual Metastatic Breast Cancer Conference. He is the ad hoc reviewer of Science, Cell, Nature Medicine, Nature Cell Biology, Caner Cell, Cell Stem Cell, JEM, Cancer Research, RNA, Nucleic Acid Research, BMC Bioinformatics, Breast Cancer Cancer Research and Treatment and Breast Cancer Research, and is an active member of American Association of Cancer Research (since 2012), Metastasis Research Society (since 2015), and American Association of Immunology (since 2016).