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The San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) and the Executive and Planning Committee proudly presents the faculty for the 2015 SABCS.
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Speaker

Mini-Symposium

"Genomics to personalize therapy of metastatic breast cancers"

Fabrice André, MD, PhD

Professor, Department of Medical Oncology

Institut Gustave Roussy

 

Fabrice André, MD, PhD, received his M.D. in Grenoble in 2002, and a PhD in Biotechnology from Paris University in 2005. He spent one year as visiting assistant professor at the University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center and was a past recipient of Young Investigator and Career Development awards from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). He is currently Professor in the Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.

Professor André is conducting research in the field of biomarkers and personalized therapies. His research work focuses on biomarker discovery, development of targeted agents and implementation of personalized medicine. His team includes 50 people working on basic sciences, bioinformatics, biotechnologies and clinical research. Professor André is also leading phase I-III trials testing targeted agents in the field of breast cancer and large national trials testing implementation of high throughput technologies in the health care system.

He has published more than 100 peer reviewed papers, including papers in the New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Nature Medicine, Journal of Clinical Oncology and Lancet Oncology, either as main or co-author.

Professor André is chairman of the biomarker group at UNICANCER (French cooperative group). He was member of several scientific committees for international meetings, including ECCO, ESMO, and IMPAKT.

 
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Moderator

Educational Session

"Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity in Breast Cancer

 

Carlos L. Arteaga, MD

Professor of Medicine & Cancer Biology

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

Carlos L. Arteaga obtained his M.D. degree with honors in 1980 at the University of Guayaquil in Guayaquil, Ecuador. He trained in Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology at Emory University (Atlanta, GA) and the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio, TX, respectively. He joined the Vanderbilt faculty in 1989 where he now holds the Donna S. Hall Chair in Breast Cancer Research and serves as Professor of Medicine and Cancer Biology in the Division of Hematology-Oncology in the Department of Medicine. Dr. Arteaga is Associate Director for Clinical Research at the NCI-designated Vanderbilt-Ingram Comprehensive Cancer Center (VICC) and directs the Breast Cancer Program of the VICC. He has over 250 publications in the areas of signaling by growth factor receptors and oncogenes in breast tumor cells as well as the development of molecular therapeutics and biomarkers of drug action in breast cancer. Dr. Arteaga directs the NCl-funded Vanderbilt Breast Cancer SPORE where he leads a number of investigator-initiated clinical trials. He is funded by NCI, ACS, the DOD Breast Cancer Research Program, Stand Up 2 Cancer/AACR, and the Komen and Breast Cancer Research Foundations. He is certified by the American Board of lnternal Medicine in Internal Medicine and in Medical Oncology. In 1998 he was elected into the American Society of Clinical Investigation (ASCI) and in 2005 into the Association of American Physicians (AAP). He serves (or has served) as member of the NCI Parent Committee for Review of Cancer Centers (Subcommittee A; 2004-2008), the Board of Scientific Advisors of the National Cancer Institute (1999-2004), the Breast Cancer Core Committee of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG), and the Board of Directors of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR; 2004-2007). He co-chaired the Developmental Therapeutics Committee of ECOG and chaired the Special Conferences Committee of the AACR (2002-2008). Dr. Arteaga is the recipient of the 2003 AACR Richard & Hinda Rosenthal Award and more recently received the 2007-2012 ACS Clinical Research Professorship Award, the 2009 Gianni Bonadonna Award from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), and the 2011 Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction from the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Breast Cancer Foundation. He has chaired the AACR Special Conference Advances in. Breast Cancer Research in 2003, 2005, 2007, and 2009. He is Deputy Editor of Clinical Cancer Research and Associate Editor or member of the Editorial Board of Cancer Cell, the Journal of Mammary Gland Biology & Neoplasia, Breast Cancer Research, Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, Journal of Clinical Oncology (past), Clinical Proteomics, and Cancer Biology & Therapy.

 
   

 

Speaker

Educational Session

"Development of molecular and genomic biomarkers: A regulatory path forward"

Julia A. Beaver, MD

Medical Officer

US Food and Drug Administration

 

Dr. Julia Beaver is a Medical Officer in the Breast Cancer Group in the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

 

She graduated from Princeton University magna cum laude in 2001 and received her M.D. degree from The University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 2007. She served both her Internal Medicine Residency (completed in 2010) and Fellowship in Medical Oncology (completed in 2013) at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Dr. Beaver’s fellowship research was in breast cancer genomics, circulating tumor DNA and the development of predictive biomarkers.

 

She is also an Assistant Professor of Oncology, part-time, at Johns Hopkins University and sees breast cancer patients at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C. as a member of the Johns Hopkins Breast Cancer Group.

 

 
   

Moderator

Educational Session

"Challenges and Complications of Local Therapy"

John R. Benson, MA DM, MD, FRCS

Consultant Surgeon

Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

 

Dr. Benson is a Consultant Breast Surgeon in the Cambridge Breast Unit based at Addenbrooke’s  Hospital, Cambridge, UK. He received his basic medical degree from Oxford University Clinical School and has been awarded doctorates from both Oxford and Cambridge Universities (DM (Oxon); MD (Cantab)). He was a research fellow at The Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, London and undertook internships both at the Royal Marsden Hospital in Surrey and the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London, UK. Further experience was gained in management of breast diseases as Visiting Professor at the New York Hospital - Cornell Medical Centre. Dr. Benson is a Fellow of Selwyn College, Cambridge where he is also Director of Clinical Studies and Professor of Applied Surgical Sciences at Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK. He is a member of the Panel of Examiners, Intercollegiate MRCS Examination (Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh) and was appointed a Regional Breast Tutor by The Royal College of Surgeons of England.  Dr. Benson is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh and a member of the British Breast Group.

His clinical practice is devoted entirely to patients with breast diseases and current research interests include investigation of a fluorescent navigation system for sentinel lymph node detection. He has published widely in the field of breast disease and coordinated or written articles for leading journals including The Lancet and The Lancet Oncology, Annals of Surgery, British Journal of Surgery, Surgical Clinics of North America and Breast Diseases Quarterly and has also contributed numerous book chapters and presented papers at major international meetings. Dr. Benson is author and editorial consultant for the breast module of PIER (American College of Physicians) and a Module Lead for the Masters in Oncoplastic Breast Surgery (E-Learning) (Royal College of Surgeons of England and University of East Anglia) [Gold Award for e-learning 2013]. He has acted as an assessor for the cancer peer review process and has been co-opted as a member of the national committee of the Association of Breast Surgeons to assist with establishment and implementation of procedures for revalidation of breast surgeons throughout the UK. Dr. Benson is a panel member for the Invited Review Mechanism, Professional Standards and Regulation Division, The Royal College of Surgeons of England.

 
   

 

Speaker

AACR Distinguished Lectureship in Breast Cancer Research

"Molecular evolution under neoadjuvant chemotherapy"

Anne-Lise Børresen-Dale, MSc, PhD

Department Head

Oslo University Hospital Radiumhospitalet

 

Anne-Lise Børresen-Dale is Professor at University of Oslo and head of Dept. of Genetics, Oslo University Hospital Radiumhospitalet. She is among the leading geneticists in research on molecular biology of breast cancer, and her group was among the pioneers in expression profiling of breast carcinomas in collaboration with groups at Stanford, demonstrating that breast cancer can be divided into distinct sub-groups with differences in molecular profiles and in overall and relapse-free survival. Her achievements are seminal for understanding breast cancer evolution, and have had an enormous impact on our view of the complexity of breast cancer. She is author of more than 450 published scientific papers, books chapters and invited reviews.

 

Børresen-Dale has received several prizes and awards, the  most recent being Swiss Bridge Award for outstanding Cancer Research in 2004, the Möbius prize for outstanding Research from the Research Council of Norway in 2008, the Helmholtz International Fellow Award, Germany in 2014 and the Fridtjof Nansen’s award for outstanding research in 2015. Børresen-Dale has been Member of the Board of Directors of both AACR and ECCO, is past president of EACR, and is Elected Member of The Royal Academy of Science, Norway, The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, and the European Academy of Cancer Sciences.

 

She is a frequently invited keynote speaker to cancer meetings and has given several  honorary lectureships, the most recent  the European Journal of Surgical Oncology Award Lecture, Liverpool in 2014, The Elena Timofeeff-Ressovsky Lecture, Berlin in 2015, and the Mildred Scheel Lecture several places in German in 2015.

 

Børresen-Dale's current research projects are focusing on Exploring the Systems Biology of Breast Cancer using high dimensional data in integrated approaches aiming at identification of genotypes and gene expression profiles contributing to elevated cancer risk, radiation sensitivity, tumor aggressiveness and therapy resistance. The goal is to follow the linear time course of predisposition, initiation, early stages and advanced disease and to dissect the molecular mechanisms triggered at each stage and to follow the multidimensional interactions at various levels in a systems biology approach to be able to better do risk estimation, prognostication and prediction.

 

Børresen-Dale has since mid-2011 been director of the K.G. Jebsen Center for Breast Cancer Research with a major funding from the K.G. Jebsen Foundation.

 

Research Focus (see http://ous-research.no/kgjebsen/)

 
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Speaker

The Year in Review

"Basic"

 

Myles A. Brown, MD

Director

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

 

Dr. Myles Brown is the Director of the Center for Functional Cancer Epigenetics at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He obtained his B.S. in Biology from Yale and his M.D. from Johns Hopkins. Following training in internal medicine at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, a fellowship in medical oncology at the Dana-Farber and postdoctoral research at MIT, he joined the staff of the Dana-Farber and the faculty of Harvard Medical School. Dr. Brown's research is focused on understanding the factors underlying the hormone dependence of breast and prostate cancers. He is recognized for three seminal discoveries including the role of p160 co-activators in steroid receptor action; the dynamic nature of co-regulator function; and the predominance of steroid receptors as enhancer-rather than promoter-binding factors.

 

 
   

 

 

Moderator

Educational Session

"Management of Advanced Breast Cancer (ABC)"

Fatima Cardoso, MD

Director, Breast Unit

Champalimaud Clinical Centre

 

Dr Cardoso is the Director of the Breast Unit of the Champalimaud Cancer Clinical in Lisbon, Portugal. Dr Cardoso earned her medical degree at the University of Porto in Portugal and completed fellowships in the Translational Research Unit of the Jules Bordet Institute (IJB) in Brussels, Belgium, and the Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. She then worked for 10 years as Assistant Professor at the Medical Oncology Clinic of the IJB where, besides her clinical work, she was active in the Translational Research Unit and was responsible for phase II-III trials in breast cancer. She is board certified in medical oncology and internal medicine.

 

Dr Cardoso’s research interests include biology of breast cancer, prognostic and predictive markers of response to systemic therapy, and new anticancer agents. She is actively involved in a number of phase I-III breast cancer clinical trials and served as the scientific director of the international research network TRANSBIG for 7 years (EU Framework VI). Dr Cardoso is actively involved in numerous professional organizations such as ESMO, ECCO, EORTC, ASCO, and AACR where she serves on several committees, is a Board Member and Chair of the National Representatives Committee of ESMO, the current EORTC Secretary General and chair of the EORTC-Breast Cancer Group. She is also the Breast Cancer Program Coordinator of the European School of Oncology and co-chair of the Advanced Breast Cancer International Consensus Guidelines Conference (ABC). Dr Cardoso is editor-in-chief of The Breast Journal, associate editor of the European Journal of Cancer, and an editorial board member of several other journals.

 

She has received several educational and research grants from the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), the European Cancer Organization (ECCO), the Portuguese Science and Technology Foundation (FCT), the Portuguese League Against Cancer, the Portuguese Ministry of Health, the Free University of Brussels, the "Fonds Jean-Claude Heuson", the Foundation Lambeau-Marteau, the Belgian Federation Against Cancer, the Susan G. Komen Foundation, and the European Union Framework VI Programme.

 

Dr Cardoso has authored over 230 publications and has presented her work nationally and internationally.

 
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Moderator

Educational Session

"Less is More: Minimizing Interventions"

Lisa A. Carey, MD

Chief, Division of Hematology and Oncology

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

Lisa A. Carey, M.D. is the Richardson and Marilyn Jacobs Preyer Distinguished Professor in Breast Cancer Research in the Department of Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is an experienced physician and scientist, who trained at Johns Hopkins University before coming to UNC in 1998. In 2012 she was appointed Chief of the Division of Hematology/Oncology and Physician-in-Chief of the North Carolina Cancer Hospital. In addition Dr. Carey is the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center (UNC-LCCC) Associate Director of Clinical Research, Program Co-Leader of the UNC-LCCC Breast Cancer Research Program and Medical Director of the UNC Breast Center.


Dr. Carey has particular interest in the clinical implications of different biologic subtypes of breast cancer and was the lead author of the key JAMA article that first recognized that young African American women have a higher risk of getting the basal-like or 'triple-negative' type of breast cancer. She designs and leads clinical trials of novel drugs and approaches, and is a close collaborator with several laboratory investigators and epidemiologists. Dr. Carey was inducted into the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars in 2008 and awarded the NCI Director's Service Award.


 
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Speaker

Educational Session

"Interpretation of genetic tests and management of patients"

Susan M. Domchek, MD

Executive Director, Basser Research Center for BRCA

University of Pennsylvania

Susan Domchek, M.D. is the Basser Professor of Oncology in the Department of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. She is the Executive Director of the Basser Research Center for BRCA at the Abramson Cancer Center as well as the Director of the MacDonald Cancer Risk Evaluation Program. A clinician and researcher, Dr. Domchek's research focuses on the role genes play in the risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer as well as the management of those at risk for the development of cancer including prevention, screening and treatment with genetically-targeted therapies.

 
 
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Speaker
The Year in Review

"Translational"

Matthew J. Ellis, BSc, MB Bchir, MRCP, PhD

Professor and Director of the Breast Center

Baylor College of Medicine

After over a decade at Washington University in St Louis as breast cancer program director, Dr. Ellis has recently been appointed Director for the Lester & Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine in Texas. In addition to leadership positions at these academic institutions, he has considerable experience in the oversight and execution of large projects and protocols of a collaborative nature on a nationwide basis. He is an active member of The Breast Cancer Intergroup of North America (TCBI) since 1998 and currently Vice Chair of the Breast Committee for the newly formed Alliance Cancer Cooperative Group. He is Co-Project leader for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Breast Project and has established strong collaborations with the Genome Center at Washington University on massive parallel sequencing of breast cancer genomes (Ellis, M.J., Ding, L. & Shen, D. Whole-Genome analysis informs breast cancer response to aromatase inhibition. Nature doi: 10.1038/nature11143 (2012). As Principal Investigator of the Specialized Program for the Evaluation Cancer Signatures (SPECS) NCI Grant (U01-CA114722) in Breast Cancer, he also led a collaboration of investigators at four universities to develop an mRNA based a clinical diagnostic test (PAM50) for subtyping breast cancer that is currently undergoing trials for FDA approval. Currently he also serves as Co-PI for the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (U24 CA160035) that endeavors to translate TCGA genomic discoveries into protein-based biomarkers with clinical utility.

Dr. Ellis has a long-standing research interest in neoadjuvant endocrine therapy and resistance to treatment supported by an NCI R01 award (R01-CA095614). The objectives of the grant are to improve long-term outcomes and reduce the toxicity of breast cancer treatment in older patients with ER+ breast cancer by developing more effective endocrine therapy regimens from the analysis of tumor biomarker data. Data from this research has contributed to the development of the Preoperative Endocrine Prognostic Index (PEPI), a metric to score the independent prognostic effects of tumor pathologic staging and expression levels of ER and the “proliferation” marker Ki67 in the surgical sample to predict long term outcomes after completion of neoadjuvant endocrine treatment. He also founded and Co-Directs the ICTS Human and Mouse Linked Evaluation of Cancer Core Facility that is designed to develop and distribute patient tumor xenografts to the scientific community in an effort to improve preclinical therapeutic modeling by the use of informed genetics.

 
   

Speaker

Educational Session

"Prognostic indicators in treatment of DCIS"

David M. Euhus, MD

Professor of Surgery

Johns Hopkins University

Dr. Euhus received his M.D. from Saint Louis University School of Medicine in 1980. He completed his General and Oncologic Surgery training at UCLA in 1991 after which he served as a Surgical Oncologist in the US. Army. His last duty station was at Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu Hawaii. He joined the faculty of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas as an Assistant Professor of Surgery in 1996. During his 17 years in Dallas he maintained a translational research laboratory focused on biological markers of breast cancer risk and developed one the nation's largest Clinical Cancer Genetics programs.  He is the author of the popular cancer genetics software program, CancerGene, which has over 6000 users in more than 75 countries. He also directed the development of CancerGene Connect, a web-based genetic counseling environment modeled after CancerGene. In October 2013 he departed Texas for Maryland where he had been appointed Professor of Surgery and Chief of Breast Surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Department of Surgery in Baltimore.

 
   

 

Speaker

Mini-Symposium

Richard Finn, MD

University of California

Santa Monica, CA

 

Dr Richard Finn is a medical oncologist on faculty at the Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.  His interests lie in the use of pre-clinical models in drug development.  Most recently he has been involved in the development of CDK 4/6 inhibitor sin breast cancer.  Pre-clinical work published in 2009 (Finn et al. Breast Can Res and Treat) identified ER+ breast cancers to be uniquely sensitive to the growth inhibitory effects of the novel CDK 4/6 inhibitor palbociclib (PD-0332991).  This lead to a randomized Phase II study of palbociclib and letrozole vs letrozole alone (Finn et al. Lancet Oncology 2015).  The results of this study were used to support the expedited approval by the US FDA of palbociclib and letrozole for advanced ER+ breast cancer.  Dr Finn has been asked to discuss CDK 4/6 inhibitors in breast cancer at SABCS 2015.

 
   

 

Speaker

Basic Science Forum

"Mass spectrometry-based proteomics"

 

Michael A. Gillette, MD, PhD

Senior Research Fellow

Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

 

Dr. Gillette is an Associate Physician at the Massachusetts General Hospital, an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School, and a Senior Research Fellow in Proteomics and Biomarker Discovery at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.  As a practicing pulmonary and critical care physician, Dr. Gillette has been motivated by the largely phenomenological diagnoses of many disease states, the general lack of “actionable” molecular taxonomies of disease, and the dearth of markers for early disease detection or therapeutic monitoring to develop expertise in the development and application of MS identity- and pattern-based biomarkers.  He leads the Broad Institute efforts in cancer proteomic biomarker discovery, serving as Broad Co-P.I. (with Dr. Steven Carr) on a multi-institutional breast cancer biomarker discovery and verification project jointly supported by the Entertainment Industry Foundation Women’s Cancer Research Fund and Komen for the Cure; heading the proteomic effort on a multi-institutional EDRN-sponsored ovarian cancer program (Steve Skates, MGH, program PI); and maintaining a leadership role in the NCI-sponsored Clinical Proteomics Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) program that has undertaken to provide deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic annotation of breast, colon and ovarian cancer samples previously genomically characterized as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas. 

 

His biomarker development work extends beyond cancer to infectious diseases of high international health import, including Gates foundation-supported studies in tuberculosis and pediatric febrile illness.  With other Broad colleagues Dr. Gillette has been involved in the development and implementation of all aspects of a coherent biomarker discovery – to – verification pipeline including abundant protein depletion, chroma-tographic fractionation, unbiased discovery MS analysis, AIMS analysis for qualification of candidate biomarkers, and MRM- and SISCAPA-based candidate verification. Dr. Gillette holds an M.D. and Ph.D. (neurophysiology) from Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, and the M.Sc. (Human Biology) and M.A. (Psychology and Philosophy) degrees from Oxford University, Oxford, UK.  He brings a blend of deep clinical knowledge and current practice, experimental design expertise, mass spectrometry and diverse laboratory skills, and over a decade of direct experience to his leadership roles in proteomic biomarker development.

 
   

 

Speaker

Educational Session

"Role of mitochondrial tumor suppressor genes and metabolism in breast cancer"

David R. Gius, MD, PhD

Professor of Radiation Oncology and Pharmacology

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

 

David Gius, MD, PhD, professor in Radiation Oncology and Pharmacology, studies connections between longevity, cellular processes, and cancer development in an effort to understand the question, why are aging and cancer so inherently linked?

 

Specifically, his lab focuses on breast cancer and the sirtuin gene family. These silent information regulator genes affect the lifespan of species in multiple ways. They help cells repair DNA damage that comes with age and suppress tumor development.

 

Gius joined Feinberg in 2012 from Vanderbilt University. Previously, he served as associate director of the National Institutes of Health Oxford/Cambridge Scholars Program and as chief of the National Cancer Center’s molecular and radiation oncology section. He earned a doctorate degree in molecular genetics from the University of Chicago and his medical degree from Loyola University. 

 
   

 

 

Moderator and Speaker

Educational Session

"Adjuvant hormonal therapy for premenopausal women"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matthew P. Goetz, MD

Consultant and Professor

Mayo Clinic

 

Dr. Goetz is a Professor of Oncology and Associate Professor of Pharmacology and holds a staff appointment as “Consultant” within the Mayo Clinic Department of Oncology, Division of Medical Oncology.  Dr. Goetz leads the clinical breast cancer research activities at Mayo where he holds the title of Chair of the Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer Disease Orientated Research Group.  Dr. Goetz is co-PI of the Mayo Clinic Breast SPORE and he is the PI or co-investigator of several NIH sponsored grants:  1) R01 CA 133049-1 (Tamoxifen Biotransformation pathway Pharmacogenomics), 2) Mayo Clinic Breast SPORE Project 2 “Endoxifen as a Novel Hormonal Therapy for Breast Cancer” (co-leader) and 3) U10GM 61388-9 (Pharmacogenomics research network grant).  The primary foci of research are clinical and translational research of breast cancer and breast cancer treatment.

 
   

 

Speaker

Educational Session

"Targeted interventions: Metformin and lifestyle change"

Pamela J. Goodwin, MD, MSc

Medical Oncologist

Mount Sinai Hospital

 

Dr. Goodwin will provide a lecture on "Targeted Interventions: Metformin and Lifestyle Change" as part of the SABCS educational session on "Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity in Breast Cancer".

 

She has been actively involved in research relating to host factors in breast cancer for the past 25 years. Early in her career, she became intrigued with the possibility that host (patient-related) factors, especially obesity, might impact outcomes of women diagnosed with breast cancer. Dr. Goodwin began a program of research that has focused on the role of these factors, including obesity, nutrition, exercise and related factors in the clinical course of breast cancer and has led a number of studies which investigate the complex interactions between body size, nutrition, exercise and physiologic mediators such as insulin, IGF-1 and vitamin D, examining the impact of these factors on risk and survival of women diagnosed with breast cancer. She has expanded this work to investigate the status of long-term breast cancer survivors and the influences of hereditary factors, vitamin D and metformin on breast cancer outcomes and currently leads a large international Phase Ill trial (NCIC MA.32) which examines the impact of an insulin lowering drug, metformin, on breast cancer outcomes.

 

Dr. Goodwin has an active translational research program examining the interface between host factors and tumor biology in both early and advanced breast cancer.

 
   

 

Speaker

Basic Science Forum

"Roles of epigenetic regulation in breast cancer development"

Michael R. Green, MD, PhD

Professor and Chair

Howard Hughes Medical Institute

 

Michael R. Green is Professor and Chair of the Department of Molecular, Cell and Cancer Biology, and the Lambi and Sarah Adams Chair in Genetic Research at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. He received his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Washington University School of Medicine in 1981. He was awarded a Helen Hay Whitney Postdoctoral Fellowship to perform postdoctoral work at Harvard University in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, which he joined as a faculty member in 1984. In 1990, he joined the Program in Molecular Medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, and served as the Director of the Program of Gene Function and Expression from 1999-2014. He is an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, a member of the National Academy of Sciences and an Associate Member of the European Molecular Biology Organization.

 

Dr. Green is a molecular biologist widely known for his contributions to our understanding of eukaryotic gene regulation. His laboratory has a broad interest in understanding the mechanisms that regulate gene expression in eukaryotes, and the role of gene expression in various human disease states, in particular cancer. Green uses functional genomic approaches to identify new genes and regulatory pathways involved in cancer and other diseases. The genes and pathways revealed by these approaches are intended to enhance our understanding of the molecular basis of disease states and represent new targets for therapeutic intervention.

 

 
   

 

Speaker

Plenary Lecture

"Critical Decision Making in Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer in 2015"

Jay R. Harris, MD

Chair, Department of Radiation Oncology

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

 

Dr. Harris is Professor and Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Brigham and Women's Hospital at Harvard Medical School.  He also serves as Residency Program Director for the Harvard Radiation Oncology Program.  He graduated from Cornell University (B.A. mathematics) and the Stanford University (M.D., M.A. statistics) and did his residency at the Harvard Joint Center for Radiation Therapy before joining the Brigham and Women's/Dana-Farber faculty in 1977.

 

Dr. Harris' main research interest has been in the area of breast cancer, with a focus on establishing the most effective and safe radiation treatment for these patients.  He helped pioneer the use of breast-conserving therapy for patients with early-stage breast cancer.  Dr. Harris has been an active member of several professional medical societies, including ASTRO where he served as President and Chairman of the Board of Directors and the American Board of Radiology where he served as Trustee.  Dr. Harris has written six books and currently sits on four editorial boards in the oncology field.  He is the senior editor of Diseases of the Breast, now in its Fifth Edition.  Dr. Harris' research in the area of radiation therapy in the multidisciplinary management of breast cancer has been recognized with distinguished honors such as the Brinker International Award for Breast Cancer Research, the ASCO Gianni Bonadonna Breast Cancer Award, and the ASTRO Gold Medal Award

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

"Regimens in HER2+ disease"

Sara A. Hurvitz, MD, FACP

Associate Professor of Medicine

University of California, Los Angeles

Dr. Hurvitz is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in the United States; co-director of the Santa Monica-UCLA Outpatient Oncology Practice; Medical Director of the Clinical Research Unit of the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center of UCLA; and Director of the Breast Oncology Program, Division of Hematology-Oncology at UCLA.

Dr Hurvitz received her medical degree from the University of Southern California School of Medicine. She served her internship and residency at UCLA, and was selected Chief Resident of Internal Medicine from 2002 to 2003. She then completed a hematology-oncology fellowship at UCLA in 2006. Dr Hurvitz is board-certified in internal medicine, hematology, and medical oncology.

Dr. Hurvitz is a member of numerous professional organizations, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Association of Cancer Research and is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians. Her research interests include the preclinical and clinical evaluation of cutting-edge targeted therapies for breast cancer, including novel therapeutic combinations. She has served as principal investigator for over 40 phase I, II, and III national and international breast cancer clinical trials and has presented and published the results of this research extensively.  She was awarded a 3-year Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program Breakthrough Grant in 2014 to evaluate the Notch pathway in breast cancer stem cells.

Dr. Hurvitz has received numerous honors, including in 2007 a Young Investigator Award from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the Marni Levine Breast Cancer Research Award 2008-2011 and 2014-2015, the Andrea Dembrowsky Breast Cancer Research Award in 2009 and 2010 and the Diana Gordon Jonsson Award for Clinical Excellence in 2011.  Dr Hurvitz is a frequent invited speaker at academic grand rounds, national and international medical symposia, and serves as a reviewer for numerous medical journals.  She teaches medical students, residents and fellows at UCLA and has been active in community service, breast cancer advocacy, and patient education.

 
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Moderator

Clinical Science Forum

"Axillary Management in Primary Breast Cancer"

 

 

Ismail Jatoi, MD, PhD, FACS

Professor and Chief, Division of Surgical Oncology

UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

Dr. Ismail Jatoi is Professor and Chief of the Division of Surgical Oncology at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio, Texas.   He is the holder of the Dale H. Dorn Endowed Chair in Surgery.  Dr. Jatoi obtained his undergraduate bachelor’s degree from Washington University in St. Louis and his MD and PhD degrees from St. Louis University.  He is a diplomat of the American Board of Surgery and a fellow of the American College of Surgeons.  He completed fellowship training in surgical oncology at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London, England.  Dr. Jatoi served in the U.S. military for many years, and was a Professor of Surgery at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, Maryland and continues to hold an Adjunct Professor appointment at that institution.  He retired from the U.S. Army with the rank of Colonel.  Dr. Jatoi has had a longstanding interest in breast cancer local therapy and adjuvant systemic therapy, the management of women at increased risk for breast cancer, and breast cancer screening.  He also has an interest in the design and analysis of cancer clinical trials.  Dr. Jatoi has previously served on the Breast Cancer Executive Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG).  He is the Principal Investigator of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, and serves on the national NSABP Working Group. Additionally he serves on the Executive Committee and the Planning Committee for the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS), and as Co-Director of the 2014 SABCS.

 
   

 

Speaker

Basic Science Forum

"Dominance of mitochondria in determining the malignant phenotype"

Benny Abraham Kaipparettu, M-Pharm, PhD

Assistant Professor

Baylor College of Medicine

 

Dr. Kaipparettu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, and a Research Member of Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, USA. (Publications before 2006 are cited as Abraham BK instead of Kaipparettu BK).

After completing his Bachelor and Master degrees in Pharmacy, Dr. Kaipparettu did PhD in Pharmacogenetics from the Jawaharlal Institute of Post-Graduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), India. He obtained postdoctoral trainings with Dr. Brauch at Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch-Institute of Clinical Pharmacology (IKP), Germany and with Dr. Oesterreich at Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, USA. He published one of the pioneering clinical papers that showed the significance of breast tumor initiating cells in distant metastasis (Abraham et al, 2005). He also established an interesting 3D cell culture model system (Kaipparettu et al 2008).

Currently Dr. Kaipparettu’s major focus is on the role of mitochondria regulated oncogenic pathways in cancer progression and metastasis. His lab mainly uses the transmitochondrial cybrid model (Vithayathil et al, 2012) to study mitochondria-nuclear crosstalk in cancer especially breast cancer. Using cybrid model, his lab evaluates different mitochondria under a common defined nuclear background to understand mitochondria regulated cancer pathways including posttranslational modifications of oncoproteins. Recent data from his lab suggest that the mitochondrial metabolomic reprogramming is a critical factor in the regulation of posttranslational modification of onco-pathways in triple negative breast cancer.

Dr.Kaipparettu is a grant review panelist as well as an editorial board member and reviewer for several scientific journals.

 
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Moderator

Educational Session

"Genetic Risk Prediction: Beyond BRCA 1/2"

Virginia G. Kaklamani, MD, DSc

Professor of Medicine

UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

Dr. Kaklamani is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology/ Oncology at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, TX and is the Leader of the Breast Cancer Program at the Cancer Therapy and Research Center. Dr. Kaklamani completed her medical training with honors at the University of Athens and her residency in Internal Medicine at Newton-Wellesley Hospital in Boston, MA. She completed her fellowship in hematology/oncology at Northwestern University. She also received a Master of Science in Clinical Investigation from Northwestern University. She was Head of the Translational Breast Cancer Program at North Western University and co-director of the cancer genetics program at the same institution. Her research interests include studying high risk families and identifying genetic mutations that are associated with an increased risk for breast, colon and prostate cancer. She has identified several genetic mutations related to obesity which increase the risk of breast cancer. Dr. Kaklamani is a clinical investigator with expertise in designing clinical trials with targeted agents.

Dr. Kaklamani is Co-Director of the Symposium.

 
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Moderator

Educational Session

"Controversies in the Management of DCIS"

 

Seema A. Khan, MD

Professor of Surgery

Northwestern Medical Group

Seema A. Khan, M.D., professor of surgery in Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, is the Bluhm Family Professor of Cancer Research.

Dr. Khan joined the Northwestern faculty in 2000 to develop a program in basic science research for breast cancer. She is co-leader of the Lynn Sage Comprehensive Breast Center and director of the Bluhm Family Program for Breast Cancer Early Detection and Prevention. 

On the cutting-edge of breast cancer research in assessing the association between nipple fluid hormones, gene methylation levels and risk of breast malignancy, Dr. Khan also conducts clinical trials of cancer chemoprevention agents. She is Northwestern's principal investigator for the breast cancer trials of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project and the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group. She chairs a National Cancer Institute Division of Cancer Prevention protocol investigating the effects of a soy supplement on the breast epithelium of women at high risk of breast cancer. She is co-investigator on a study of the role of alpha-B crystallin expression in breast cancer biology and was principal investigator on a recent study of ductal lavage biomarkers in high-risk women. 

Dr. Khan is an associate member of the Early Detection Research Network and has served on the National Consortium of Breast Centers board of directors and the endocrinology review panel of the Department of Defense. She has also served on peer-review panels of the National Cancer Institute, the Avon Foundation, and the Susan G. Komen Foundation. She is a founding member of the board of directors of the International Society of Cancer Risk Assessment and Management and is a member of the breast cancer screening panel of the National Comprehensive Cancer Center Network. She belongs to many professional societies, including the American College of Surgeons and the Society for the Study of Breast Disease. 

Dr. Khan has published more than 70 peer-reviewed articles as well as six book chapters and 90 abstracts. She is on the program committee of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and served as track leader for breast cancer at the 2009 annual meeting. She is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Clinical Oncology and serves as a reviewer for many professional journals.

 
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Moderator

Basic Science Forum

"Targeting Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Breast Cancer"



Michael T. Lewis, PhD

Associate Professor
Baylor College of Medicine

 

Dr. Lewis has been working in the field of breast development and cancer since 1995. His current research is focused on the identification of normal and malignant stem cells, and the role of malignant stem cells in treatment resistance. He is also actively studying stromal regulation of mammary epithelial cell biology.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

"Biology of DCIS"

 

Moderator

Basic Science Forum

"Novel and Unconventional Drivers and Mechanisms of Breast Tumorigenesis"

 

Yi Li, PhD

Associate Professor

Baylor College of Medicine

The long-term goal of Dr. Li’s research program is to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms of breast cancer initiation and progression and to translate this knowledge into breast cancer prevention and treatment in both preclinical models and a clinical setting. His graduate studies were on molecular biology and microbiology. During his postdoctoral study with Dr. Harold Varmus (first at NCI and then at MSKCC), he gained extensive training in cancer biology and mouse models of breast cancer. The most significant accomplishment of this training was the discovery of the first evidence that breast cancer heterogeneity arises from transformation of distinct subsets of mammary cells. Dr. Li’s laboratory uses various mouse models to study breast cancer as well as normal mammary development, and has made a number of key contributions to the breast cancer field: they defined the ATM-mediated anticancer barrier during breast cancer initiation, identified a mammary bio potential progenitor population which is marked by keratin 6, discovered a molecular mechanism underlying increased breast cancer risk caused by late-age first pregnancy , and established intermittent anti-STAT5 for preventing breast cancer. Now they have some provocative preliminary data linking hyperglycemia to breast cancer metastasis, which will be the focus of this proposal.

 
   

 

 

Speaker

Educational Session

"Metabolic asymmetry in breast cancer: Implications for personalised medicine"

 

Speaker

Basic Science Forum

"Targeting mitochondria with FDA-approved antibiotics may be a new therapeutic strategy to eliminate cancer stem cells"

Michael P. Lisanti, MD-PhD

Director, Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Unit

University of Manchester

 

Professor Lisanti serves as the Director of the Manchester Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Unit and holds the Muriel Edith Rickman Chair of Breast Oncology within the Institute of Cancer Sciences. He is also Professor of Cancer Biology and the new founding Director of the Manchester Centre for Cellular Metabolism (MCCM). Memberships of Committees and Professional Bodies American Society for Investigative Pathology (ASIP) American Association for Cancer Research (MGR.)

 

Recent advances have highlighted the important role of the stroma in breast cancer development. Professor Lisanti’ s research programme  focuses on the role of Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in the pathogenesis of human breast cancer, with a strong emphasis on its role in signalling, cancer, metabolism and stem cell biology. Cav-1 status in the stroma provides important information about the aggressiveness of the cancer and may be a valuable and accessible biomarker to predict breast cancer recurrence and metastasis. With the discovery and validation of biomarkers that allow us to identify patients most likely to have poor prognosis, we now have the tools with which to drive the continued development of personalised medicine approaches. These biomarkers will also have a role to play in informing patient selection for clinical trials, allowing new treatments to be tested in patient populations likely to derive the most benefit             

 

Compartmentalisation of Signal Transduction: The "Caveolae Signalling Hypothesis”. In 1993-94, Dr. Lisanti was among the first to propose that signal transduction takes place in an organized fashion, within lipid rafts and caveolae, which are specialized domains at the cell surface. This mechanism includes G-proteins, Src-like kinases, NOS, and the Ras·MAP kinase signaling, as well as many other pathways. This signalling model was heretical in the early 1990s, and is now well accepted today.

 

Compartmentalisation of Tumor Metabolism: In 2009, Professor Lisanti was the first to propose the "Reverse Warburg Effect'. This new model for cancer metabolism will facilitate the development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics, driving personalised cancer therapy.

 

Stromal Cav-1 as a Biomarker: In 2009, Professor Lisanti discovered a new prognostic biomarker, which has now been validated in 8 different countries world-wide for breast cancer. Its prognostic value has also been extended to DClS lesions (early breast cancers), prostate cancers, and metastatic melanoma, and it may well represent a universal or widely-applicable cancer biomarker for stratified medicine. More specifically, his laboratory has shown that a loss of stromal Cav-1 predicts early tumour recurrence, metastasis, drug-resistance, and overall poor survival in breast cancer patients, at diagnosis, before poor clinical outcome has occurred.

 

An active research .scientist for more than three decades with a broad background in cell biology and genetics, Professor Lisanti graduated with a degree in Chemistry (Magha Cum Laude) from New York University and obtained his MD-PhD at Comell University Medical School in Cell Biology and Genetics. From 1992-96, he was a Skeggs Fellow at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), followed by several distinguished appointments at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the Kimmel Cancer Center. Professor Lisanti joined the Breakthrough Unit in 2012 as Professor of Cancer Biology. He is currently listed amongst the Top 100 Most-Cited Researchers in Biochemistry and Biology. He has an H-idex >120, with over 50,000 citations. Moreover, he has published > 480 papers and is the former Editor-in-Chief of The American Journal of Pathology.

 
   

 

 

Speaker

Educational Session

"Neoadjuvant endocrine therapy"

Cynthia X. Ma, MD, PhD

Associate Professor of Medicine

Washington University

 

Dr. Cynthia Ma obtained her MD from Beijing Medical University in China and subsequently PhD in Developmental Biology from the University of Cincinnati. She completed her Internal Medicine residency from New Hanover Regional Medical Center in North Carolina followed by the Hematology/Medical Oncology fellowship at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. 

In 2005, she was recruited as a breast oncologist at Washington University School of Medicine (WUSM).  She is currently an Associate Professor of Medicine and a research member of Siteman Cancer Center.  In August 2014, Dr. Ma was appointed as the Clinical Director of the Breast Cancer Program at WUSM.

Dr. Ma’s research includes preclinical and clinical trial development of molecularly targeted cancer therapeutics for the treatment of resistant breast cancer. She is the principal investigator for several biomarker directed clinical trials of biological agents including UCN-01, temsirolimus, MK-2206, BKM120, IMC-A12, and palbociclib in breast cancer. Dr. Ma is the study chair for several neoadjuvant endocrine therapy trials in patients with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer.

 
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Speaker

Clinical Science Forum

"Optimal management of the axilla: A look at the evidence"

Eleftherios (Terry) P. Mamounas, MD, MPH, FACS

Medical Director, Comprehensive Breast Program
UF Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health

 

Terry P. Mamounas, M.D., is Medical Director of the Comprehensive Breast Program at UF Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health, Professor of Surgery at University of Central Florida and Clinical Professor of Clinical Sciences at Florida State University. He is also Chair of the Breast Committee at the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) in Pittsburgh,

Pennsylvania and Chair of the NRG Oncology Breast Committee.

 

Dr. Mamounas received his medical degree from the University of Athens Medical School in Athens, Greece, and a Masters of Public Health degree in Epidemiology from the University of Pittsburgh.  He completed his surgical residency at McKeesport Hospital in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, an oncology research fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh and a surgical oncology fellowship at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York.

 

Dr. Mamounas has authored or co-authored over 300 abstracts, manuscripts, and book chapters, and he has given numerous presentations on breast cancer at various regional, national, and international symposia.  His clinical research for the past 25 years has focused on the surgical and adjuvant treatment of early-stage breast cancer. He is a member of several professional societies including the American College of Surgeons, the Society of Surgical Oncology, the American Society of Clinical Oncology the American Society of Breast Disease and the American Society of Breast Surgeons. Dr. Mamounas is a member of the NCI Breast Cancer Steering Committee. He serves on the editorial boards of Journal of Clinical Oncology, Clinical Breast Cancer and Women's Health and he is past associate editor for the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Mamounas is a past member of the Scientific Advisory Council for the Susan G. Komen for the Cure.

 

 
   

 

Speaker

Educational Session

"Role of adipokines and inflammation in breast cancer risk and progression"

Christos Mantzoros, MD, DSc, PhD h.c. mult.

Professor of Medicine

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

 

Dr. Mantzoros' research program focuses on obesity, its comorbidities and adipokine biology. His basic research efforts utilize genomics-bioinformatics, animal physiology, and molecular biology studies to elucidate the role of new molecules important in energy homeostasis. His current translational/clinical investigations focus mainly on the role of metabolically important hormones, including leptin and adiponectin as well as their downstream effectors, on energy homeostasis and metabolic abnormalities. Dr. Mantzoros' work spans the entire spectrum from animal physiology and molecular biology, through observational studies, to physiology and pharmacokinetic interventional proof of concept clinical trials in humans on new therapeutic agents important in the treatment of the above disorders. Recent major contributions by his research group include the elucidation of the physiological role and potential diagnostic and therapeutic utility of leptin in human physiology and pathophysiology as well as the role of adiponectin in insulin resistance, inflammation and malignancies. Their work has resulted in more than 500 publications that have received more than 34,000 citations and has also resulted in patents for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, has directly contributed to the development of new pharmaceuticals by pharmaceutical companies.

 
   

 

 

Speaker

Basic Science Forum

"Functional proteomics characterization of breast cancer"

 

Gordon B. Mills, MD, PhD

Professor/Chairman

UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

 

At the MD Anderson Cancer Center, Dr. Gordon B. Mills, MD, PhD is the Chair of Systems Biology, co-director of the Institute for Personalized Cancer Therapy (IPCT), the Head of the Kleberg Center for Molecular Markers and co-director of the Women's Cancer Moonshot. He founded the Department of Systems Biology at the MD Anderson Cancer Center which was the first Cancer Systems Biology Department and the second Systems Biology Department in the US. The Kleberg Center for Molecular Markers is responsible for developing the markers needed for personalized molecular medicine and the IPCT responsible for the implementation into clinical practice. The Women's Cancer Moonshot is tasked with developing transformational approaches to improving patient outcomes high-grade serous ovarian cancer and triple negative breast cancer which represent the most aggressive and challenging forms of each disease. His research ranges across: 1) mechanistic studies determining the role of genomic and other aberrations present in patient tumors, 2) identification and validation of therapeutic targets, 3) developing, validating and implementing molecular markers and 4) integrating data through a cancer systems biology approach into robust predictive mathematical models. The overarching goal is "to let the patient teach us what is important". This process is facilitated by the implementation and integration of a comprehensive suite of high throughput technologies including assessment of genomic aberrations, transcriptional profiles, functional proteomics and metabolomics and drug screening using conventional and high content imaging systems. They have implemented a comprehensive functional genomics program designed to distinguish drivers from passengers and identify their therapeutic liabilities. Iliad local, national and international efforts to integrate information from multiple omics level into a robust personalized cancer therapy approach. This effort has recently been recognized by the award of the Kernen Foundations Brinker award for scientific excellence.

 

They have implemented and improved the high throughput functional proteomics reverse phase protein array (RPPA) technology allowing characterization of up to 1000 different conditions, either mechanistic studies or patient samples with up to 300 validated antibodies. They have analyzed over 15,000 patient samples including over 6000 from The Cancer Genome Atlas and over 300 cell lines locally as well as the Cell Line Encyclopedia providing a robust database to develop and test hypotheses. The resulting data is being made available through the Cancer Proteome Atlas (TCPA, http://app1 bioinformatics.mdanderson .org/tcpa/_design/basic/index.html). In order to provide resources to the research community, Dr. Mills coordinates the CCSG Functional Proteomics, Characterized Cell Line, and Mutation Detection Cores as well as the Mass Spec Proteomics resource at MDACC.

 

His research has provided major mechanistic and therapeutic insight into the role of aberrant levels of lysophospholipids including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and sphingosine 1 phosphate (S1P), expression of the enzymes involved in their activity, and their receptors in the initiation progression and therapy of cancer. Using transgenic animal models developed in my laboratory, they have demonstrated that the expression of the enzyme that produces LPA, Autotaxin, or each of the key LPA receptors is sufficient to induce the development of invasive and metastatic breast cancers. Strikingly, inhibition of the function of LPA and S1P markedly decreases the growth, invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. These studies have now progressed to clinical trials in cancer and wet macular degeneration. Based on studies of genomic aberrations in ovarian, breast and endometrial cancers, they have developed research programs exploring the mechanisms by which the Rab25 small G protein, the growth regulator MECOM, the polarity regulator PKC•, the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (Pl3K) signaling pathway and miRNAs located within genomic amplicons contribute to the initiation, progression and therapy of cancer. Their studies of the Pl3K pathway have increased the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of signaling and in particular regulatory loops and integration with other signaling pathways. This contributed to his position as coPI of The Pl3K Kinase in Women's Cancer Stand Up to Cancer Dream Team.

 

Dr. Mills holds more than 20 patents related to novel technologies and molecular markers and has co-founded an early diagnostics company. He currently sits on the scientific advisory boards of multiple companies and venture capital groups. Based on his expertise in technology development, he was the founding head of the MD Anderson Cancer Center Technology Review Committee.

 

They have been very successful in training and career development for young scientists both in terms of graduate students and fellows and in junior faculty. Dr. Mills has mentored or sat on the mentorship committees of over 100 trainees and junior scientists. The majority of his trainees have developed successful research careers rising through the ranks to full professor, department chairs and institute directors. Based on this role Dr. Mills has been nominated for and awarded multiple mentoring awards including the Stand up to Cancer Laura Ziskin Prize for Mentoring.

 
   

 

Speaker

Special Sessions

"Breast cancer early detection strategies in absence of screening mammography"

Indraneel Mittra, MBBS, FRCS, PhD

Dr. Ernest Borges Chair in Translational Research

Tata Memorial Centre

 

Prof. Indraneel Mittra is an internationally renowned cancer surgeon and a cancer research scientist. Currently he holds the Dr. Ernest Borges Chair in Translational Research and is Professor Emeritus, Department of Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai.   

 

Prof. Mittra obtained his medical degree from University of Delhi, and did his Post Graduate Training in Surgery in the UK and became a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. He obtained his Ph.D. degree from University of London and did his post-doctoral training with Dr. Renato Dulbecco, Nobel Laureate, at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund Laboratories in London.  

 

On returning to India in 1982, Prof. Mittra joined the Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai as a Consultant Surgeon in the Department of Surgical Oncology and became the Chief of its Breast Cancer Service. Simultaneously Prof. Mittra held the position of Head of the Division of Laboratory Medicine that he set up at TMH.   

 

Prof. Mittra has published extensively in the fields of clinical, basic as well as public health research in cancer in major international journals. He happens to be the first Indian investigator to have received a RO-1 grant from the US NIH to conduct one of the largest randomized trials of screening for breast and cervical cancer. Prof. Mittra has the distinction of having published his first ever scientific contribution as a single author paper in Nature in 1974, and happens to be the first Indian scientist to have published in the journal Cell.  Prof. Mittra is/has been on the Editorial/Advisory Board of Journal of Biosciences, British Medical Journal, Lancet Oncology, Nature Clinical Practice Oncology, British Journal of Cancer, European Journal of Cancer, International Journal of Surgery, The Breast, Critical Reviews in Oncology/ Haematology etc. Prof. Mittra was conferred the Roll of Honours by the International Union Against Cancer in 1994.  

 

He has been visiting professor to several international institutions and held the Prestigious Pearce Gould Professorship at University College London in 1998. Prof. Mittra is a fellow of the Indian Academy of Sciences and Indian National Science Academy.   

 

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

"Toxicities of endocrine therapy in the pre and post-menopausal setting"

Polly Niravath, MD

Assistant Professor

Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Niravath earned her undergraduate degree in Biological Sciences from the University of Southern California, then went on to attend medical school at the University of California, Irvine. She then completed her internal medicine residency and hematology/oncology fellowship at Baylor College of Medicine, where she stayed on as faculty in the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center. She is board certified in Internal Medicine, Hematology, and Oncology. As the director of the survivorship program at the LSSBC, Dr. Niravath has conceived of and initiated several clinical trials within the field of survivorship, including studies which target common problems such as vaginal dryness and arthralgia. She has also published several manuscripts and book chapters on issues such as treatment of young breast cancer survivors, as well as management of aromatase inhibitor induced arthralgia.  She also serves as a moderator and chair for the Texas Breast Health Collaborative Summit, an annual state-wide conference dedicated to offering care to the under-served.

 
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Moderator

The Year in Review

C. Kent Osborne, MD

Director, Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center

Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. C. Kent Osborne was born in 1946 in St. Louis, Missouri. He received his AB and MD degrees from the University of Missouri, both with honors. He completed his residency at Johns Hopkins in 1974, and his medical oncology fellowship at the NCI in 1977.  He was a faculty member at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, where he rose to Professor and Director of the Division of Medical Oncology. In 1999 Dr. Osborne moved to Baylor College of Medicine to develop a Breast Center and in 2005 he became Director of the new cancer center.  Currently, Dr. Osborne is Director of the Dan L Duncan Cancer Center and Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine.

Dr. Osborne is a physician scientist.  His research has focused on understanding the mechanisms of resistance to therapies targeting ER and HER2 and the cross-talk between these pathways. For 10 years Dr. Osborne was Chairman of the Breast Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group, where he oversaw numerous nationwide clinical trials investigating new treatment strategies. He has been the Principal Investigator of the Baylor Breast Cancer SPORE grant for 20 years. Among his previous awards are the Komen Foundation Award for Scientific Distinction and the Brinker International Award.  He has been a director of the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium for 22 years.


 
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Moderator

Educational Session

"Development and Use of Molecular Biomarkers for Cancer"

Ben Ho Park, MD, PhD

Associate Professor of Oncology
Johns Hopkins University

Dr. Park has had an unwavering commitment and dedication to training the next generation of biomedical researchers.  Beginning in 2002, he has taught medical and graduate students in didactic and small group sessions within four different graduate group programs and won several teaching awards.  He is an active participant in numerous medical school training programs including sitting on the selection committee for Hopkins’ M.D.-Ph.D. (MSTP) training program and involvement with the Medical Oncology Fellowship Training Program where he serves as the Associate Director and oversees the research component of Fellows’ training. He also serves as the Co-PI (multi-PI) for the T32 training grant for Medical Oncology Fellows.  Dr. Park has a demonstrable track record of training both laboratory and clinical post-doctoral fellows, and has mentored six Medical Oncology Fellows in the past, all of whom are now Assistant Professors at major academic cancer centers. He continues to devote 80% of his effort to his laboratory and is always available for his trainees.

 
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Moderator

Mini-Symposium

"Precision Medicine by Sequencing: Is it Ready for Common Clinical Use?"

Charles M. Perou, PhD

Professor

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Dr. Perou’s research crosses the disciplines of genomics, cancer biology, bioinformatics, epidemiology, and clinical trials. A major contribution of his has been in the characterization of the diversity of breast tumors, which resulted in the discovery of the Basal-like/Triple-Negative Breast Cancer subtype. This genomics-based classification, known as the “intrinsic subtypes” of breast cancer, is now being used to improve risk stratification for breast cancer patients and to help physicians better understand why some cancers do or do not respond to standard therapies including endocrine and chemotherapy. He and his colleagues demonstrated that breast tumors can be classified into at least five molecular subtypes, with his lab focusing particular attention on the Basal-like subtype.  He is also elucidating the genetic causes that give rise to each subtype, modeling these events in genetically engineered mouse models, and then using these animal models to investigate the efficacy of new drugs and new drug combinations. Dr. Perou has also translated these molecular finding into human population-based studies; using the North Carolina-based epidemiological study (Carolina Breast Cancer Study), he and his colleagues found that pre-menopausal African American women were diagnosed with Basal-like tumors approximately twice as often as their Caucasian counterparts, thus providing insight into racial outcomes disparities differences seen in the USA.

Dr. Perou has authored more than 230 peer reviewed articles, and he is an inventor on 2 USA and 1 European patents. His lab has received support from the NIH/NCI, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Susan G. Komen, and V Foundation for Cancer Research. He has been a faculty member at UNC-CH since 2000, where he is now the holder of an endowed professorship. He is the Faculty Director of the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center (LCCC) Bioinformatics Group, and Co-Director of the LCCC Breast Cancer Research Program. He is a member of the ALLIANCE/CALGB Breast Committee, and Co-Chair of the Triple-Negative Working Group of the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium. He is also the co-founder of two genomics-based biotechnology companies (Bioclassifier LLC and GeneCentric Diagnostics), both of which are focused on developing genomic signatures into routine cancer diagnostics.

He earned his Bachelor’s degree in Biology from Bates College, his PhD in Cell Biology from the University of Utah, and performed his postdoctoral work in the laboratory of David Botstein (then at Stanford University). Lastly, he was the recipient of the 2009 AACR Outstanding Investigator Award for Breast Cancer Research, the 2011 Danaher Scientific and Medical Award that is a Susan G. Komen Award for Scientific Distinction, the 2012 European Institute of Oncology Breast Cancer Therapy Award, the 2013 Hyman L. Battle Distinguished Cancer Research Award from UNC, and in 2014 he was named a Thomson Reuters Most Highly Cited Researcher.

 
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Speaker

Plenary Lecture

"HER 2"

Moderator

Case Discussions

 

Mothaffar Rimawi, MD

Associate Professor

Baylor College of Medicine

As a board certified oncologist and a breast cancer researcher, expertise are relevant to Dr. Rimawi's duties as a program committee member. He trained in internal medicine, hematology/oncology, and breast oncology at Baylor College of Medicine. Dr. Rimawi has also performed published peer reviewed basic and clinical research. He is an associate professor involved in patient care, education, in addition to research.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

"Tailoring chemotherapy"

Alistair Ring, MA, FRCP, MD

Consultant in Medical Oncology

Royal Marsden Hospital

Dr. Alistair Ring is a Consultant in Medical Oncology at The Royal Marsden Hospital, UK. He undertook his pre-clinical training at the University of Cambridge and clinical training at the University of Oxford, qualifying in 1997. His oncology training was based at The Royal Marsden, St George's and Guy's Hospitals, London. He gained his MD research degree in 2005 from the lnstitute of Cancer Research at the University of London. In 2008 he was appointed as Senior Lecturer in Oncology at Brighton and Sussex Medical School, where he held various roles including Director of the Brighton NIHR Clinical Research Facility. In 2014 he was appointed Consultant in Medical Oncology at The Royal Marsden  

He has a specialist interest in the management of metastatic and early breast cancer and the management of cancer in older patients. He has a major interest in research, and is UK lead for a study which will investigate the role of aspirin in the treatment of over 3,000 women with early breast cancer. Dr. Ring has published widely in peer-reviewed journals and is regularly invited as a speaker at national and international meetings.

Dr. Ring is a member of the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Breast Clinical Studies Group and chair of the NCRI Advanced Breast Cancer subgroup, which oversees trials for advanced breast cancer in the UK. He is a member of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

   
   


Speaker

Educational Session

"De-escalting systemic therapy"

Hope S. Rugo, MD

Professor of Medicine

University of California, San Francisco

Dr. Hope Rugo is a hematologist and oncologist specializing in breast cancer treatment. She joined the UCSF Carol Franc Buck Breast Care Center after a decade at UCSF Medical Center working in the area of malignant hematology and bone marrow transplantation for a variety of diseases, including breast cancer.

Dr. Rugo, co-director of the Breast Oncology Clinical Trials Program, has a special interest in therapies for breast cancer and is the principal investigator of several clinical trials testing these treatments. She is a professor of medicine at UCSF and an investigator of SPORE (Specialized Program of Research Excellence in Breast Cancer) in the Bay Area.

 

 

 

 

 
   

Moderator

Educational Session

"Integration of Metabolism and Tumor Biology"

Pothana Saikumar, PhD

Associate Professor

UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

 

Dr. Pothana Saikumar received his PhD in Biochemistry from the Indian Institute of Science Bangalore, India in 1985. In 1988 he received a postdoctoral fellowship in Molecular Oncology from the National Cancer Institute-Frederick Cancer Research Facility, Frederick, MD and in 1992 a fellowship at The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, PA.

 

Dr. Saikumar is on a team of researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio’s School of Medicine that believes they have found one therapeutic target and a possible biomarker that may be beneficial to many patients with triple-negative breast cancers.  To date, there is no way to treat patients with triple-negative breast cancers without harming healthy cells.  However, the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio has been awarded a $1 million grant from the Susan G. Komen Foundation to address this challenging issue.  Understanding how triple-negative breast cancer cells work will provide information on how to develop targeted therapies that do not have the side effects of current chemotherapies.

He has received several awards including the Sudhir Gupta Young Scientist Award from ASIOA in 2003 and the AACR MSI Faculty Scholar Award for 2010, 2011 and 2012.

 
   

 

Speaker

Educational Session

"Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction: defining the effects of adjuvant treatment modalities on surgical outcomes"

Hani Sbitany, MD

Assistant Professor of Surgery

University of California

 

Dr. Hani Sbitany is a plastic and reconstructive surgeon specializing in reconstructive and cosmetic breast surgery. He performs a high volume of post-mastectomy breast reconstruction , including microsurgical free tissue transfer, implant-based techniques, and fat grafting. He was trained in plastic surgery at the University of Rochester, and in reconstructive microsurgery at at the University of Pennsylvania, and he performs the most advanced proceedures for restoring form and function after breast cancer surgery. Other areas of expertise skin cancer removal, and general plastic and reconstructive surgery.

 

Dr. Sbitany's research focuses on optimizing clinical outcomes of breast reconstruction following breast cancer treatment with adjuvant therapies, as well as outcomes and safety of techniques for fat transfer to the breast.

 

Dr. Sbitany practices at the University of California, San Francisco. He is a diplomat of the American Board of Plastic Surgery, and is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons.

 
   

 

Moderator

Basic Science Forum

"Proteomic Analysis of Breast Cancer: Biological and Clinical Findings"

Rachel Schiff, PhD

Associate Professor

Baylor College of Medicine

 

Dr. Schiff is an Associate Professor at the Baylor College of Medicine, Sue & Lester Smith Breast Center and the Departments of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology. She is an internationally recognized expert in breast cancer translational research and in preclinical therapeutic models, especially concerning endocrine, HER2, and additional targeted therapies.  Dr. Schiff has received her PhD in 1992 from Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School in Jerusalem and had completed her post-doctoral fellowship at University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX.

 

Dr. Schiff’s research focuses on understanding key signaling pathways in breast cancer and on identifying therapeutic strategies to overcome them. Major interests include molecular aspects of estrogen receptor (ER) action in breast cancer, the crosstalk between the ER signaling network and growth factor receptor and cellular kinase pathways, the role of ER co-regulators in breast cancer development and progression, mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapies, and the identification of genomic and epigenomic alterations, transcriptional signatures, and biomarkers of hormonal and antiHER2 therapy resistance for therapeutic interventions. Dr. Schiff’s research is partly supported by grants from the National Cancer Institute, BCRF, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, and the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program.

 
   

 

Moderator

Mini-Symposium

"Cell Cycle Regulation: CDK Inhibitors"

George W. Sledge, Jr., MD

 

Professor of Medicine

Stanford University

 

Dr. George Sledge is the Oncology Chief at Stanford University School of Medicine where he is currently a Professor of Medicine. He specializes in the study and treatment of breast cancer and directed the first large nationwide study on the use of paclitaxel to treat advanced breast cancer. His recent research focuses on novel biologic treatments for breast cancer. He has published over 250 articles in medical journals about breast cancer and chaired several nationwide clinical trials involving new breast cancer treatments. His work spans both laboratory and clinic.

 

Dr. Sledge serves as Editor-in-Chief of the journal Clinical Breast Cancer, and Past President of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. He served as Chairman of the Breast Committee of the Eastern Cooperative Society of Clinical Oncology Group from 2002-2009, where he played an important role in the development of several nationwide clinical trials. He has also served as chair of ASCO's Education Committee, as a member of the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program's Integration Panel, as a member of the Food and Drug Administration's Oncology Drug Advisory Committee (ODAC), and currently as a member of the External Advisory Committee for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project.

 

Dr. Sledge was the recipient of the 2006 Komen Foundation Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction, the 2007 Breast Cancer Research Foundation's Jill Rose Award and was the 2010 recipient of the William L. McGuire Award from the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

 
   

 

Speaker

William L. McGuire Memorial Lecture

 

Norman Wolmark, MD

Medical Research Director

Allegheny General Hospital

 

Norman Wolmark, M.D., Professor of Surgery, Drexel University College of Medicine; Professor of Surgery, Temple University School of Medicine, Senior Physician, Allegheny General Hospital; Chairman, National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP).

 

Norman Wolmark, M.D. received his medical degree from McGill University of Montreal.  After completing his residency at the University of Pittsburgh, he served a fellowship in Surgical Oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.  Dr. Wolmark is Board Certified by the American Board of Surgery and the Royal College of Surgeons.  Prior to coming to Allegheny in 1994, Dr. Wolmark practiced at Montefiore University Hospital where he was the Surgeon-in-Chief, and he served on the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh where he occupied the Mark Ravitch Chair in Surgery.

 

A member of a number of professional associations and organizations including the American Surgical Association, Dr. Wolmark is widely published with more than 380 articles, papers and book chapters in print.  He is a widely sought after speaker and lecturer in his field. Dr. Wolmark also serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Women's Cancer, the Journal of Clinical Oncology, numerous advisory boards, and as an advisor to oncology programs, societies and institutes throughout the United States and abroad.

 

Dr. Wolmark is Chairman of the NSABP.  This national clinical trials group was founded in 1958 and has a membership of nearly 300 universities and community hospitals where patients are cared for using NSABP protocols.  More than 15 years ago, due in large part to the findings of an NSABP study, the National Institutes of Health Consensus Conference recommended that lumpectomy and breast irradiation be the procedure of choice for women with primary breast cancer. In another study, the NSABP demonstrated for the first time that a drug could be used in the prevention of cancer.

Tamoxifen is now standard therapy used by high risk women to prevent or reduce the risk of breast cancer.

 
   

 

Speaker

Educational Session

"Insulin/IGFs/PI3K signal transduction"

Douglas Yee, MD

Director, Masonic Cancer Center

University of Minnesota

 

Douglas Yee, M.D. is director of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota.  A professor in the Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, Dr. Yee holds the John H. Kersey Chair in Cancer Research.  He is internationally known for his breast cancer research and more specifically for his laboratory research focused on the growth regulation of tumors by the insulin-like growth factors.   Dr. Yee’s curriculum vitae includes over 200 publications.  He also maintains an active clinical practice in breast medical oncology in the Breast Center at University of Minnesota Medical Center.

 

Dr. Yee has served on numerous national grant review and cancer research and treatment policy panels including the National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Center Parent Committee and the National Institutes of Health and Department of Defense Integration Panel.  Dr. Yee is a Pew Scholar and a Komen Scholar for the Susan G Komen for the Cure and is a co-investigator on a V Foundation Translational Research Grant.  He has a leadership role in the ISPY-2 clinical trial where he serves on the Executive Committee, the Data Access and Publication Committee, and serves as co-chair of the Agent Selection Committee.  Dr. Yee is also a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee for the Love/Avon Army of Women. Dr. Yee is a past chair of the Scientific Program Committee for the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s 2013 Annual Meeting.

 

Dr. Yee graduated from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, earned his medical degree from the University of Chicago, and completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill and his fellowship in medical oncology at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, MD.  Before coming to the University of Minnesota, he held faculty positions in the Lombardi Cancer Center at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., and at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio.

 

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