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Faculty   >  Faculty

 
The San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) and the Executive and Planning Committee proudly presents the faculty for the 2014 SABCS.
 
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Speaker
Educational Session

 

 

Benjamin O. Anderson, MD

Professor of Surgery and Global Health Medicine

University of Washington

Dr. Anderson is Professor of Surgery and Global Health Medicine at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle where his practice is devoted to caring for patients with breast health issues and cancer. Dr. Anderson’s clinical interests include oncoplastic breast surgery, which simultaneously improves oncologic and cosmetic outcomes with complex cancer resections. He holds joint faculty positions at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Division of Public Health Sciences and the UW Department of Global Health. He directs the Breast Health Clinic at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA). From 2005-2007, Dr. Anderson served as President of the American Society of Breast Disease (ASBD).

 

Dr. Anderson created and chairs the Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI), which developed resource-stratified guidelines for breast cancer early detection, diagnosis and treatment in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). On the U.S. delegation to the 58th World Health Assembly in Geneva, Dr. Anderson contributed to the 2005 World Health Organization (WHO) Cancer Prevention and Control Resolution. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) awarded Dr. Anderson their 2011 Partners in Progress Award. In 2012, Dr. Anderson was elected to the Board of Directors of the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), the oldest international professional organization addressing global cancer control. Dr. Anderson now chairs the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) International Program Committee. Most recently, the National Consortium of Breast Centers (NCBC) awarded him their 2013 Inspiration Award, recognizing his dedication and efforts to improve quality and effectiveness of breast cancer care around the globe.

 
   

 


Speaker

Mini-Symposium

Antonis C. Antoniou, PhD

Senior Cancer Research Fellow

University of Cambridge

 

The main research interests of Dr. Antoniou involve the development and application of statistical modelling techniques to the inherited susceptibility of disease and in particular common cancers. His current research focuses on two areas: (1) the development of risk prediction models for familial breast, ovarian and prostate cancer, including the BOADICEA model which can be used for predicting the risk of carrying BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and the risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer in the future; (2) the identification and characterization of modifiers of cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

 

In 2002 Dr. Antoniou received the American Association for Cancer Research - AstraZeneca Scholar-in-Training Award and in 2009 he received the Cancer Research - UK Senior Cancer Research Fellowship.

Dr. Antoniou is a reader in cancer risk prediction in the Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge and a Cancer Research UK Senior Cancer Research Fellow, Group Leader, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge.

In 2013 Dr. Antoniou became a member of the Scientific Advisory Board Member of Breast Cancer Campaign (UK) and in 2014 a Member of the Commissioned Research Advisory Board of Breast Cancer Campaign (UK).

 
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Moderator

Basic Science Forum

 

Carlos L. Arteaga, MD

Professor of Medicine & Cancer Biology

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

Carlos L. Arteaga obtained his M.D. degree with honors in 1980 at the University of Guayaquil in Guayaquil, Ecuador. He trained in Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology at Emory University (Atlanta, GA) and the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio, TX, respectively. He joined the Vanderbilt faculty in 1989 where he now holds the Donna S. Hall Chair in Breast Cancer Research and .serves as Professor of Medicine and Cancer Biology in the Division of Hematology-Oncology in the Department of Medicine. Dr. Arteaga is Associate Director for Clinical Research at the NCI-designated Vanderbilt-Ingram Comprehensive Cancer Center (VICC) and directs the Breast Cancer Program of the VICC. He has over 250 publications in the areas of signaling by growth factor receptors and oncogenes in breast tumor cells as well as the development of molecular therapeutics and biomarkers of drug action in breast cancer. Dr. Arteaga directs the NCl-funded Vanderbilt Breast Cancer SPORE where he leads a number of investigator-initiated clinical trials. He is funded by NCI, ACS, the DOD Breast Cancer Research Program, Stand Up 2 Cancer/AACR, and the Komen and Breast Cancer Research Foundations. He is certified by the American Board of lnternal Medicine in Internal Medicine and in Medical Oncology. In 1998 he was elected into the American Society of Clinical Investigation (ASCI) and in 2005 into the Association of American Physicians (AAP). He serves (or has served) as member of the NCI Parent Committee for Review of Cancer Centers (Subcommittee A; 2004-2008), the Board of Scientific Advisors of the National Cancer Institute (1999-2004), the Breast Cancer Core Committee of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG), and the Board of Directors of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR; 2004-2007). He co-chaired the Developmental Therapeutics Committee of ECOG and chaired the Special Conferences Committee of the AACR (2002-2008). Dr. Arteaga is the recipient of the 2003 AACR Richard & Hinda Rosenthal Award and more recently received the 2007-2012 ACS Clinical Research Professorship Award, the 2009 Gianni Bonadonna Award from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), and the 2011 Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction from the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Breast Cancer Foundation. He has chaired the AACR Special Conference Advances in. Breast Cancer Research in 2003, 2005, 2007, and 2009. He is Deputy Editor of Clinical Cancer Research and Associate Editor or member of the Editorial Board of Cancer Cell, the Journal of Mammary Gland Biology & Neoplasia, Breast Cancer Research, Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, Journal of Clinical Oncology (past), Clinical Proteomics, and Cancer Biology & Therapy.

   
   

Speaker

Mini-Symposium

Banu Arun, MD

Professor

UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

 

Dr. Banu Arun is a Professor in the Department of Breast Medical Oncology at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Arun is also Co-Medical Director of the Clinical Cancer Genetics Program at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Her research interests include breast cancer, biological markers, chemoprevention, and breast cancer genetics. Her laboratory and clinical research include characterization of risk factors in high-risk women with or without deleterious BRCA mutations and assessing breast cancer biology in patients with breast cancer who have mutations of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. Dr.Arun has served as the Principal Investigator of several phase II breast cancer prevention trials with agents such as celecoxib, atorvastatin and targretin. Dr. Arun serves as an ASCO Cancer Prevention and ASCO Genetics Subcommittee member as well as an NCCN breast cancer risk assessment committee member.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

Kimlin Tam Ashing, PhD

Professor

City of Hope Medical Center

Dr. Kimlin Tam Ashing is professor, and directs the Center of Community Alliance for Research and Education (CCARE) at City of Hope. She received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the University of Colorado, Boulder. As an advocate-scientist her work is advancing community, theoretical and methodological aprroaches in behavioral, implementation and translational sciences. She is active in several cancer related organizations; she serves on the Board of Directors for the American Psychooncology Society; National Advisory Council for the Asian Pacific Islander Native Hawaiian Cancer Survivors Network, Executive Council of American Cancer Society, Los Angeles, and as Scientific Advisor to Komen for the Cure, LA., Latinas Contra Cancer and the African-Caribbean Cancer Consortium and the Southern Los Angeles Patient Navigation and Wellness Center.

 

She is the notable leader in examining cancer disparities and quality of life, and has published over 60 articles and book chapters. Her life work is to increase the voice and representation of underrepresented groups in health sciences and research by mentoring students and trainees, and increasing the capacity of community organizations to engage in research and address their cancer and chronic conditions. Dr. Ashing examines relevant living situation, historical and cultural contexts as these relate to health outcomes and culturally responsive health care. Her work in this area is significant and innovative and guides much of the health-equity and cross-cultural cancer survivorship research. Her scholarship is to understand and investigate how culture, ethnicity, socio-ecological and systemic contexts influence health and patient centered outcomes.

 

Currently she is partnering with community advocates and city staff to develop and implement community participatory interventions to reduce the risk and burden of chronic illnesses, including cancer, obesity and diabetes.She is a community-minded researcher who is guided by a bio-psychosocial and eco-cultural paradigm. Her research focuses on assessing and understanding the influence of the biological (i.e. familial, disease characteristics); psychological (i.e. stress, coping); social (i.e. family and support networks); cultural (i.e. spirituality, language); ecological (i.e. micro-level: work, neighborhood and macro-systemic: healthcare, socio-political status, discrimination) factors on health outcomes. Her studies are multicultural including diverse ethnic groups i.e. African Americans; Afro-Caribbean Americans; Latino Americans; Chinese, Japanese, and Korean Americans and European Americans.

 

Her current papers report on health outcome studues with samples that include; Asian American (n=277), African American (n=186), Latino American (n=470) and European American (n=452) breast and cervical cancer survivors in the US (N=1385). These studies examines quality of life, psycosocial functioning, work and functional issues, access and quality of care as well as methodological, conceptual and measurement factors relevant to multicultural, multilingual and cross cultural research. Her current, community collaborative studies are behavioral trials designed to reduce the psycosocial burden and improve access and adherence to survivorship care plans among diverse survivor populations.

 
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Speaker
Educational Session

Hamdy A. Azim, MSc, MD

Professor of Medical Oncology

Cairo University

 

Hamdy A. Azim is a Professor of Clinical Oncology at Cairo University in Egypt. He finished his doctorate degree on the management of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in adults (1986). Dr Azim then obtained postdoctoral training at the Medical Oncology Department in Curie Institute in Paris, France and at the Department of Adult Lymphoma and Bone Marrow Transplants, St. Louis Hospital in Paris.

Dr. Azim was assigned as an assistant professor in the department of clinical oncology, Cairo university on February 1992 and then a full professor in 1997.
Dr Azim is a member of numerous societies including ASCO, ASH, ESMO , the European Blood and Marrow Transplantation Society (EBMT), and the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology (ASTRO). He sits on several scientific and steering committees and has been invited as an international speaker in more than 300 regional and international conferences in all the Pan-Arab counties, Russia , India, Singapore ,Iran, France, Spain, Austria, Turkey, South Africa and US. Dr. Azim has also served as a speaker for the ASCO online educational programme.

 

His main interests lie in breast cancer, lymphoma, molecular target therapy, and bone metastases, where he has published more than 75 peer reviewed papers and more than 400 abstracts. Dr Azim served as an editor for the Journal of Clinical Lymphoma, The Lancet (Middle East edition), and the Journal of Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine Cairo university. He was the chief editor of 2 educational books ( ASCO – PANARAB Lymphoma Conference (1999) and the MD Anderson Cancer Centre / Cairo University joint Conference (2006). Dr Azim serves as a referee for the Annals of Oncology Journal, THE BREAST, Chemotherapy journal , Advances in Cancer Research & Treatment and Journal of the Egyptian National Cancer Institute.

He has been honoured with several awards including Scientist of the Year from the International Biographical Centre, Cambridge, UK (2002), the Order of Merit, Cambridge University (2002), the Best Arab Oncologist from the Lebanese Society of Medical Oncology (LSMO,2004) and "The Recognition Award" for significant contribution to the Oncology field in the middle east from UAE (Dubai -2013), in addition to several awards from many Egyptian cancer centers and societies.

In 2008, Dr. Azim was nominated as the chairman of the steering committee of the NCCN [ Middle East Program ], which is responsible to set the guide lines of the management of certain cancers in the region . On January 2012 , Dr. Azim was elected to serve as the chairman of the department of clinical oncology ,faculty of medicine,Cairo University.

 
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Moderator

Educational Session

John Benson, MD

Consultant Surgeon

Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

 

Dr. Benson is a Consultant Breast Surgeon in the Cambridge Breast Unit based at Addenbrooke’s  Hospital, Cambridge, UK. He received his basic medical degree from Oxford University Clinical School and has been awarded doctorates from both Oxford and Cambridge Universities (DM (Oxon); MD (Cantab)). He was a research fellow at The Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, London and undertook internships both at the Royal Marsden Hospital in Surrey and the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London, UK. Further experience was gained in management of breast diseases as Visiting Professor at the New York Hospital - Cornell Medical Centre. Dr. Benson is a Fellow of Selwyn College, Cambridge where he is also Director of Clinical Studies and Professor of Applied Surgical Sciences at Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK. He is a member of the Panel of Examiners, Intercollegiate MRCS Examination (Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh) and was appointed a Regional Breast Tutor by The Royal College of Surgeons of England.  Dr. Benson is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh and a member of the British Breast Group.

His clinical practice is devoted entirely to patients with breast diseases and current research interests include investigation of a fluorescent navigation system for sentinel lymph node detection. He has published widely in the field of breast disease and co-ordinated or written articles for leading journals including The Lancet and The Lancet Oncology, Annals of Surgery, British Journal of Surgery, Surgical Clinics of North America and Breast Diseases Quarterly and has also contributed numerous book chapters and presented papers at major international meetings. Dr. Benson is author and editorial consultant for the breast module of PIER (American College of Physicians) and a Module Lead for the Masters in Oncoplastic Breast Surgery (E-Learning) (Royal College of Surgeons of England and University of East Anglia) [Gold Award for e-learning 2013]. He has acted as an assessor for the cancer peer review process and has been co-opted as a member of the national committee of the Association of Breast Surgeons to assist with establishment and implementation of procedures for revalidation of breast surgeons throughout the UK. Dr. Benson is a panel member for the Invited Review Mechanism, Professional Standards and Regulation Division, The Royal College of Surgeons of England.

 
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Speaker

Basic Science Forum

René Bernards, PhD

Section Leader

Netherlands Cancer Institute

 

René Bernards studied adenovirus transformation for his PhD research from 1980 to 1984 with Alex van der Eb in Leiden. He joined the laboratory of Robert Weinberg at the Whitehead Institute in Cambridge, USA for his postdoctoral training, were he worked with Stephen Friend on the isolation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene. He was appointed assistant professor at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center in 1988. In 1992 he joined the Netherlands Cancer Institute. In 1994 he was also appointed part time professor of molecular carcinogenesis at Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

 

His scientific accomplishments include the development of MammaPrint, the first clinically-used gene expression profile for breast cancer. To bring this discovery to the clinic he co-founded “Agendia”, a genomics-based diagnostic company that started offering the first microarray-based diagnostic test for the clinical management of breast cancer in 2004. His laboratory also developed the first shRNA vector for gene silencing in mammalian cells and used this vector to create the first genome-scale library of shRNA vectors. His laboratory has used this vector collection to identify biomarkers of response to cancer drugs and to identify particularly powerful drug combinations for the treatment of cancer, based on the concept of synthetic lethality. There are currently four clinical trials that test the efficacy of combination therapies suggested by his genetic screens: NCT01719380; NCT01750918; NCT01791309 and NCT02039336.

 

He received several awards for his research, including the Pezcoller Foundation-FECS Recognition for Contribution to Oncology, the Ernst W. Bertner Award for Cancer Research from the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the ESMO Lifetime Achievement Award in Translational Research in Breast Cancer, the Spinoza award from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research and the Queen Wilhelmina Research Prize from the Dutch Cancer Society. He is also a member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and received the Academy Professor Prize from this organization in 2013.

 
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Moderator

Educational Session

Melissa Bondy, PhD

Professor

Baylor College of Medicine

 

Dr. Melissa Bondy is an Associate Director for Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences in the Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center at Baylor College of Medicine, and a McNair Medical Institute Scholar in breast cancer and neuroscience. She is also a Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and, and co-PI of the R-25 Training grant in Childhood Cancer Epidemiology. She served on the Komen Scientific Advisory Board for three years and is currently a Komen Scholar. Her research projects include studies in breast cancer, brain tumors, and disparities research. Her breast cancer studies are related to predictive markers of outcome and recurrence in individuals with early stage breast cancer, and investigating disparities in minority populations. She also leads two large multi-center international glioma studies, one studying the role of familial/hereditary etiology of gliomas within families, and the second is a case-control study of gene and environment association.

 
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Speaker

The Year in Review

Harold J. Burstein, MD, PhD

Associate Professor of Medicine

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Harold J. Burstein, MD, PhD is an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, and a medical oncologist at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital. Dr. Burstein attended Harvard college, and earned his MD at Harvard Medical School where he also earned a PhD in immunology. He additionally has a master's degree in history of science from Harvard. He trained in internal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital and in medical oncology at Dana-Farber.

His clinical research interests include novel treatments for early and advanced-stage  breast cancer, and studies of quality of life and health behavior among women with breast cancer.  Dr. Burstein has written widely on breast cancer in both traditional medical journals and on the web.  Representative publications can be found in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of Clinical Oncology, and other leading medical journals.   He serves on international breast cancer committees including the NCCN Breast Cancer Panel, The St. Galien Breast Cancer Panel, and the Alliance Breast Cancer Committee, and chairs the ASCO guidelines on endocrine therapy for breast cancer.   Dr. Burstein an Associate Editor for Cancer Education at the· Journal of Clinical Oncology.

 
 
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Speaker
Susan G. Komen® Brinker Award   for Scientific Distinction
Basic Science Lecture

Joan S. Brugge, PhD
Chair, Department of Cell Biology
Harvard Medical School

 

Dr. Brugge has characterized a number of the molecules and molecular pathways that lead to cell transformation. Early in her career, she identified the impact of virus-generated proteins on cell transformation, including the large T antigen of SV40 virus and the Src protein of the Rous Sarcoma Virus. Her contributions to the discovery of the viral and cellular Src proteins made it possible to study the mechanisms by which Src proteins control normal and tumor cell behavior and led to a clearer understanding how a cellular protein can become an oncoprotein and induce tumorigenic transformation. She also identified the importance of integrin receptors in signal transduction as well as the identification of Ras as a critical intermediate in growth factor activation of MAP Kinase.

 

More recently, Dr. Brugge and her team have championed using 3D cultures to study key processes in breast cancer initiation, including survival of tumor cells when displaced from their normal niches, invasion and loss of polarity. These studies have led to a better understanding of the basis for anchorage dependence of normal epithelial cells and the mechanisms by which tumor cells escape this mechanism. The Brugge lab was also the first to discover entosis – when one cell invades another and is contained in a special vacuole until it exits the cell by exocytosis or is killed via lysosomal destruction – and its promotion of tumorigenesis.

 

Her most recent studies have focused on drug resistance. She has collaborated with the 2013 Brinker Awardee in Basic Research, Dr. Gordon Mills, to identify adaptive responses to targeted therapies that confer drug resistance. This resistance involves activation of multiple cellular pathways that prevent apoptosis. Interestingly, the activation of this adaptive response is specifically detected in tumor cells that are in association with specific extracellular matrix proteins, suggesting that these environments provide protection from targeted therapies.

 

Dr. Brugge earned her Ph.D. in Virology from Baylor College of Medicine and performed her postdoctoral training at the University of Colorado. After her training, she was a faculty member at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, the University of Pennsylvania and served as the Scientific Director of ARIAD Pharmaceuticals. In 1997, she joined the faculty at Harvard Medical School as Professor of Cell Biology, became Chair of Cell Biology in 2004 and Co-Director of the Ludwig Center at Harvard in 2014.

 

Dr. Brugge’s leadership at her institution, in the breast cancer community, and in the general cancer community has influenced the way cancer research is conducted. Her longstanding commitment to mentoring future breast cancer researchers has provided the research community with innovative, new ideas to tackling breast cancer’s toughest questions. Her ability to move into different experimental systems, identify important questions to address, and use innovative approaches have brought critical insights into new areas of breast cancer research. Dr. Brugge’s contributions to the field of breast cancer signal transduction and her current work on tumor heterogeneity will significantly impact the future of the fields of breast cancer research and treatment.


 
   

Speaker

Educational Session

David A. Cameron, MD

Professor of Oncology

Edinburgh Cancer Research Centre

Long standing interest in the neo-adjuvant breast cancer field , including my MD research topic focussing on understanding the effects of tamoxifen in human breast cancer: both in patients and as xenografts.

 

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Krishna B. Clough, MD

Medical Director

L 'Institut du Sein-Paris
Paris Breast Centre

 

Dr. Krishna B. Clough is a surgical oncologist and a plastic surgeon, specialized in breast surgery. He graduated in general surgery and in surgical oncology, but also in plastic, cosmetic, and reconstructive surgery.

After completing his surgical training in France (Paris University) and in the United States (Columbia University, New York, and Emory University Atlanta), Dr. Clough joined the most famous French hospital for breast cancer treatment (the Curie Institute) in 1990.

In 1996, at the age of 38, he was appointed Chief of the Department of General and Breast Surgery of the Curie Institute, where he published numerous clinical and research papers on breast cancer and breast surgery. He decided to resign from his hospital functions in 2004 to found the Paris Breast Centre-L’Institut du Sein, the first centre in France dedicated exclusively to breast surgery and breast cancer.
Meanwhile, he kept on his clinical research and teaching: he, along with a small group of European surgeons, created the concept of “Oncoplastic surgery” (the use of sophisticated plastic surgery techniques to reshape the breast in order to preserve the breast while preventing cosmetic sequelae). Fully integrated into a multidisciplinary treatment, with all the other treatments for cancer, the concept of oncoplastic surgery is now spreading worldwide in the field of breast oncology, as it is considered as one of the main recent advances in breast cancer surgery.

Dr. Clough is a member of the board of directors of the French Society of Breast Disease. He is also a member of the French Societies of oncology, and plastic, reconstructive, and cosmetic surgery. He is one of the founding members of Breast Surgery international and a member of the European Society of Mastology.

Dr. Clough is known worldwide in the field of breast surgery. He has represented France in numerous international working groups (consensus conferences), whose works have been the object of reference publications. He is the founder and director of the breast surgery masterclass at the European School of Surgery (Paris), and is the co-chairman of the breast surgical course at the European Institute of Oncology (Milan).

He has published over 120 scientific articles on breast surgery and the treatment of cancer in international scientific journals. As such, he is constantly invited to give lectures and presentations in numerous countries. He has authored several chapters in teaching books and a book for patients about breast cancer (Breast Cancer, Editions Marabout, Paris).

He speaks fluent English.

 
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Moderator

Educational Session

Richard L. Crownover, MD, PhD

Professor Clinical Radiation Oncology

UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

Board certified Radiation Oncologist with 18 years specializing in management of breast cancer.

 
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Speaker

Basic Science Forum

 

 

Alan D'Andrea, MD

Professor, Fuller-American Cancer Society

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

A graduate of Harvard College, Dr. D’Andrea received his MD from Harvard Medical School in 1983. He completed his residency in Pediatrics at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and a fellowship in pediatric hematology-oncology at DFCI and Children's Hospital, Boston. Dr. D’Andrea also completed a research fellowship at the Whitehead Institute of Biomedical Research at MIT where he cloned the receptor for erythropoietin while working in the laboratory of Harvey Lodish. Dr. D’Andrea joined the staff at DFCI in 1990. His research is focused on the molecular cause of leukemia. He also investigates the pathogenesis of Fanconi anemia, a human genetic disease characterized by bone marrow failure and AML in children.

 

Dr. D’Andrea is internationally known for his research in the area of DNA damage and DNA repair. He is currently the Fuller-American Cancer Society Professor of Radiation Oncology at Harvard Medical School and the Director of the Center for DNA Damage and Repair at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. A recipient of numerous academic awards, Dr. D’Andrea is a former Stohlman Scholar of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, and has previously served on their Medical and Scientific Advisory Board. He is currently Chairman of the Career Development Selection Committee of the LLS, and Chairman of the NIH Molecular and Cellular Hematology Study Section. Dr. D’Andrea is a Distinguished Clinical Investigator of the Doris Duke Charitable Trust, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is also the recipient of the 2001 E. Mead Johnson Award, the highest award in Pediatric Research, and the 2012 G.H.A. Clowes Memorial Award from the American Association for Cancer Research.

 
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Speaker

Plenary Lecture

Nancy E. Davidson, MD

Director University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and UPMC Cancer Center

University of Pittsburgh

Nancy E. Davidson serves as the Hillman Professor of Oncology and Distinguished Professor of Medicine in Pitt’s School of Medicine, director of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and UPMC Cancer Center, and associate vice chancellor for cancer research. She holds secondary appointments as professor of pharmacology and chemical biology and professor in the Clinical and Translational Science Institute.

An International expert in breast cancer Dr. Davidson has published key findings on the role of hormones, particularly estrogen, on gene expression and cell growth in breast cancer. She has guided several important national clinical trials of potential new therapies, including chemoendocrine therapy for premenopausal breast cancer. Her research has been supported by a portfolio of funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Department of Defense, the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, and Susan Komen for the Cure. Davidson has coauthored more than 280 articles in the top journals of her field, including the New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, and the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

She earned an MD degree from Harvard Medical School and completed an internal medicine internship at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and internal medicine residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Subsequently, Davidson completed a medical oncology fellowship at the NIH’s National Cancer Institute. Prior to joining Pitt, she served as director of the Breast Cancer Program and as the breast cancer research chair of oncology at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

A member of the scientific advisory board for many foundations and cancer centers, Davidson has served as an elected member of the boards of directors of the American Association of Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the two largest organizations for cancer researchers and oncology professionals in the world. She was president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology from 2007-2008. She is an elected member of the Association of American Physicians and the Institute of Medicine. She has received many awards for breast cancer research, most recently the 2010 ASCO Bonadonna Breast Cancer Award.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

 

Mary L. (Nora) Disis, MD

Professor/Associate Dean

University of Washington

Mary L. (Nora) Disis, M.D., is the Athena Distinguished Professor of Breast Cancer Research, Associate Dean for Translational Health Sciences in the University of Washington (UW) School of Medicine, Professor of Medicine and Adjunct Professor of Pathology and Obstetrics and Gynecology at UW and a Member of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. She is the Director of the Institute of Translational Health Science and the Center for Translational Medicine in Women’s Health at UW.

 

Dr. Disis received her M.D. from the University of Nebraska and completed a residency and Chief Residency in Internal Medicine at the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago. She completed a fellowship in Oncology at the University of Washington/Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center where she has remained on faculty.

 

Dr. Disis is an expert in breast and ovarian cancer immunology and translational research. Her research interest is in the discovery of new molecular immunologic targets in breast and ovarian cancer for the development of vaccine and cellular therapy for the treatment and prevention of those malignancies. In addition, her group evaluates the use of the immune system to aid in the diagnosis of cancer and develops novel assays and approaches to quantitate and characterize human immunity. She holds several patents in the field of targeted cancer therapy and cancer diagnostics. Dr. Disis is a member of Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society, the American Society of Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians. She is the Deputy Editor for the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

 
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Moderator and Speaker

Educational Session

&

Susan G. Komen® Brinker Award   for Scientific Distinction
Clinical Research Lecture


Mitchell Dowsett, PhD, FMedSci

Clinical Scientist (Consultant)
Head of Academic Department of Biochemistry

Royal Marsden Hospital

Prof. Dowsett has worked on biomarkers in neoadjuvant treatment of ER+ breast cancer for over 20 years. He is the co-chair of International Ki67 in Breast Cancer Working Party and is on the Steering Committee of ASCO/CAP guideline panels for ER/PgR and HER2. The Co-PI of POETIC, the largest pre-surgical study conducted in breast cancer and an author of over 500 academic/research papers.

 

 

 

 
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Speaker

Plenary Lecture

Matthew J. Ellis, MD, PhD

Professor and Director of the Breast Center

Baylor College of Medicine

After over a decade at Washington University in St Louis as breast cancer program director, Dr. Ellis has recently been appointed Director for the Lester & Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine in Texas. In addition to leadership positions at these academic institutions, he has considerable experience in the oversight and execution of large projects and protocols of a collaborative nature on a nationwide basis. He is an active member of The Breast Cancer Intergroup of North America (TCBI) since 1998 and currently Vice Chair of the Breast Committee for the newly formed Alliance Cancer Cooperative Group. He is Co-Project leader for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Breast Project and has established strong collaborations with the Genome Center at Washington University on massive parallel sequencing of breast cancer genomes (Ellis, M.J., Ding, L. & Shen, D. Whole-Genome analysis informs breast cancer response to aromatase inhibition. Nature doi:10.1038/nature11143(2012). As Principal Investigator of the Specialized Program for the Evaluation Cancer Signatures (SPECS) NCI Grant (U01-CA114722) in Breast Cancer, he also led a collaboration of investigators at four universities to develop an mRNA based a clinical diagnostic test (PAM50) for subtyping breast cancer that is currently undergoing trials for FDA approval. Currently he also servse as Co-PI for the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (U24 CA160035) that endeavors to translate TCGA genomic discoveries into protein-based biomarkers with clinical utility.


Dr. Ellis has a long-standing research interest in neoadjuvant endocrine therapy and resistance to treatment supported by an NCI R01 award (R01-CA095614). The objectives of the grant are to improve long-term outcomes and reduce the toxicity of breast cancer treatment in older patients with ER+ breast cancer by developing more effective endocrine therapy regimens from the analysis of tumor biomarker data. Data from this research has contributed to the development of the Preoperative Endocrine Prognostic Index (PEPI), a metric to score the independent prognostic effects of tumor pathologic staging and expression levels of ER and the “proliferation” marker Ki67 in the surgical sample to predict long term outcomes after completion of neoadjuvant endocrine treatment. He also founded and Co-Directs the ICTS Human and Mouse Linked Evaluation of Cancer Core Facility that is designed to develop and distribute patient tumor xenografts to the scientific community in an effort to improve preclinical therapeutic modeling by the use of informed genetics.

 
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Speaker

Basic Science Forum

Andrew J. Ewald, PhD

Assistant Professor of Cell Biology and Oncology
Johns Hopkins University

 

Dr. Ewald has spent the past decade developing imaging, genetic, and 3D organotypic culture techniques to enable real-time analysis of cell behavior and molecular function in breast cancer. During his postdoctoral studies at UCSF, he developed novel 3D organotypic culture and imaging techniques to reveal the cellular mechanisms and molecular regulation of growth and invasion in normal epithelium and in malignant mammary tumors. His laboratory seeks to understand how epithelial cancer cells escape their normal developmental constraints and acquire the ability to invade, disseminate, and establish metastatic sites.

He is Assistant Professor of Cell Biology and Oncology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

In 2014 he served on the Research Review Committee, The Mary Kay Foundation and the 2014 AACR: Tumor Microenvironment Steering Committee. Dr. Ewald is Co-Director of the Hopkins-Highmark Cancer Research Fund.

 
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Speaker

Special Forum

Elizabeth S. Frank, BA, Ed.M

Patient Advocate

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Liz Frank is the lead patient advocate for the Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (DF/HCC) Breast Cancer Patient Advocacy Committee. Liz is a ten year breast cancer survivor. Her interest in patient advocacy developed from her personal experience as a breast cancer patient, volunteering with local and national advocacy organizations, and her prior work experience in research and program evaluation. Upon completion of her treatment, she trained as a patient advocate by attending the National Breast Cancer Coalition’s (NBCC) Project LEAD Science Course in November 2006, the Clinical Trials Project LEAD in November 2008, followed by Quality LEAD in 2009.

Liz coordinates and organizes the DF/HCC Patient Advocacy Committee and develops opportunities for members to collaborate with translational and clinical researchers at the DF/HCC. Additionally, she serves as a patient advocate for several groups, including the DF/HCC Breast Cancer Clinical Trials Group, the Patient Advocate Working Group for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC), and the ISPY-2 Trial Data Safety Monitoring Committee. Liz currently serves on the NCI Breast Cancer Steering Committee and is Co-Chair of the NCI Patient Advocate Steering Committee. Liz is particularly interested in increasing the effectiveness of patient advocates, issues related to educating and consenting of patients on clinical trials, incorporating meaningful patient outcomes in clinical trials, and the return of clinical trial results. The patient advocacy group at Dana Farber completed and presented a study on sharing clinical trial results with participants. Liz has presented a patient perspective on issues related to donating tissue for research at the annual meetings of the AACR and PRIMR this past year. She has presented on the topic of patient engagement in clinical trial development at the National Breast Cancer Coalition's annual Leadership Summit this past May. Liz received her B.A. from Boston University in economics and a Masters degree from the Harvard School of Education in education research and program evaluation.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

Mehra Golshan, MD

Director Breast Surgical Services
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Dr. Golshan serves at the Director of Breast Surgical Services at the Dana Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center and is the Dr. Abdul Mohsen and Sultana Al-Tuwaijri Distinguished Chair in Surgical Oncology at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He also is an Associate Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Golshan's research interest is focused primarily on neoadjuvant therapies for breast cancer and the use of novel imaging and operative technologies targeting breast carcinoma. The focus of the preoperative therapy trials is to target treatment for women with cancer and develop genotypic profiles that will in the future lead to individualized tailored therapies for women with breast cancer. The role of intraoperative and preoperative imaging is also an area of research. In the United States, nearly 40% of women who undergo lumpectomy will need a second operation to achieve clear margins. We are currently trying to determine if more accurate tumor assessment with breast MRI prior to surgery will lead to a decrease in the number of operative procedures required to achieve clear margins. We are also working on the use of intraoperative imaging assessment with breast MRI in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operative Suite (AMIGO) to determine if we can find residual tumor while the patient is under anesthesia and improve operative outcomes. Dr. Golshan has served on the planning and advisory committee’s for the American Society of Breast Surgeons, American Society of Breast Disease, Kyoto Breast Consensus Conference, Breast Gynecology International Conference, and Global Breast Cancer Conference.

 
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Speaker

The Year in Review

William J. Gradishar, MD

Betsy Bramsen Professor of Breast Oncology & Professor of Medicine
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

 

Dr. William J. Gradishar, M.D., F.A.C.P. is professor of medicine in the division of hematology and medical oncology, department of medicine, at the Feinberg School Medicine at Northwestern University. He is also the Betsy Bramsen Professor of Breast Oncology. His research focuses on the development of the latest therapies for breast cancer treatment. He has published extensively in the area of breast cancer therapy, with a focus on endocrine therapy, chemotherapy and novel targeted therapies.

After receiving his medical degree from the University of Illinois Abraham School of Medicine in Chicago, he completed a residency and chief residency in internal medicine at Michael Reese Hospital and Medical Center in Chicago. He completed a fellowship in Medical Oncology at the University of Chicago.

Dr. Gradishar is a member of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University. He is the Director of the Maggie Daley Center for Women’s Cancer Care and Director of Breast Medical Oncology at Northwestern Memorial Hospital/Northwestern University. In addition, he is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, a member of the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Federation for Clinical Research. He chairs the Professional Development Committee and is the Chair-elect of the Nominating Committee of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and serves on numerous breast cancer committees in other major oncology organizations, including as a consultant to the Oncology Drug Advisory Committee of the FDA. He has been a member of the Breast Cancer Treatment Guideline Committee and the Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Committee of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) since its inception.

 
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Speaker

Basic Science Forum

Reuben Harris, PhD

Professor

University of Minnesota

Dr. Harris is a Professor in the Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics department, an Associate Director of the Institute of Molecular Virology, and a Member of the Masonic Cancer Center. He received his B.S. (1993) and Ph.D. (1997) degrees from the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. He performed postdoctoral work at the Baylor College of Medicine (1997-8), at Yale University (1998), and at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology (1998-2003). He joined the University of Minnesota as an Assistant Professor in the summer of 2003, became a tenured Associate Professor in 2008, and was promoted to Full Professor in 2013. As a Postdoctoral Fellow in Cambridge working with Dr. Michael Neuberger, Dr. Harris discovered a family of cellular enzymes that catalyze the conversion of the DNA base cytosine into the RNA base uracil. One member of this family is essential for generating antibody diversity (adaptive immunity) and several combine to provide protection from a wide variety of parasitic elements such as HIV (innate immunity). At least one member also becomes dyregulated in multiple human cancers and provides a major source of mutations. Dr. Harris has done pioneering studies in all of these areas, thus far publishing over 100 manuscripts, contributing to 10 patents, and co-founding ApoGen Biotechnologies LLC. He continues to run an academic research laboratory with multiple projects focused on the roles of these enzymes in both immunity and carcinogenesis.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

Norah Lynn Henry, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor

University of Michigan

Since completing her fellowship in Hematology/Oncology at the University of Michigan, Dr. Henry has conducted clinical and translational research in breast oncology. Her work has primarily been supported by a Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator Award. The primary focus of her research has been predictors of response to and toxicity of therapy for breast cancer. In particular, she has extensively studied and published on the toxicity of aromatase inhibitor therapy, including clinical, biochemical, and genetic predictors of discontinuing aromatase inhibitor therapy because of intolerable side effects as well as mechanisms underlying development of side effects. These side effects are the primary reasons that patients are noncompliant with aromatase inhibitor therapy. At the 2013 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, she had the opportunity to present some of her findings during an oral abstract presentation.

 
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Speaker

William L. McGuire Memorial Lecture

James N. Ingle, MD

Professor of Oncology

Mayo Clinic

Dr. Ingle is Professor of Oncology and Foust Professor in Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. He is the leader of breast cancer research in the Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center serving as Program Co-Leader of the Women's Cancer Program with responsibility for breast cancer. Dr. Ingle is the Director of the Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer Specialized Program of Research Excellence. He was the Chair of the Breast Committee of the North Central Cancer Treatment Group for 22 years (1977-1999).

His primary interests are pharmacogenomics and translational research involving endocrine therapy of breast cancer and the biology of endocrine sensitivity. He has 322 peer-reviewed publications. He has served on numerous national and international bodies such as the NIH (1990, Conference Vice-Chair) and St. Gallen (2003-2011) Concensus Conference Panels on early breast cancer, serving as Co-Chair of the 2009 St. Gallen Conference. He recently completed his service on the Breast Cancer Steering Committee of the NCI Coordinating Center for Clinical Trials.

   
   

 

Speaker

Basic Science Forum

Catriona Jamieson, MD, PhD

Associate Professor of Medicine

UCSD Moore Cancer Center

 

Catriona Jamieson, MD, PhD, is Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology-Oncology, Co-Leader of the Hematologic Malignancies Program, Hematology Team Leader, and Director of Stem Cell Research at the Moores UCSD Cancer Center.

Dr. Jamieson specializes in myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) and leukemia. Myeloproliferative neoplasms are a family of uncommon but not rare degenerative disorders in which the body overproduces blood cells. Myeloproliferative neoplasms can cause many forms of blood clotting including heart attack, stroke, deep venous thrombosis, and pulmonary emboli and can develop into acute myelogenous leukemia. Although some effective treatments are available, they are laden with serious side effects. In addition, individuals can become resistant to the treatments. Dr. Jamieson studies the mutant stem cells and progenitor cells in myeloproliferative neoplasms. These cells can give rise to cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells may lie low to evade chemotherapy and then activate again later, causing disease progression and resistance to treatment. Her goal is to find more selective, less toxic therapies.

 
   

Moderator and Speaker

Clinical Science Forum

Ismail Jatoi, MD, PhD, FACS

Professor and Division Chief Surgical Oncology

UT Health Science Center San Antonio

San Antonio, TX

Dr. Ismail Jatoi is Professor and Chief of the Division of Surgical Oncology at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio, Texas.   He is the holder of the Dale H. Dorn Endowed Chair in Surgery.  Dr. Jatoi obtained his undergraduate bachelor’s degree from Washington University in St. Louis and his MD and PhD degrees from St. Louis University.  He is a diplomate of the American Board of Surgery and a fellow of the American College of Surgeons.  He completed fellowship training in surgical oncology at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London, England.  Dr. Jatoi served in the U.S. military for many years, and was a Professor of Surgery at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, Maryland and continues to hold an Adjunct Professor appointment at that institution.  He retired from the U.S. Army with the rank of Colonel.  Dr. Jatoi has had a longstanding interest in breast cancer local therapy and adjuvant systemic therapy, the management of women at increased risk for breast cancer, and breast cancer screening.  He also has an interest in the design and analysis of cancer clinical trials.  Dr. Jatoi has previously served on the Breast Cancer Executive Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG).  He is the Principal Investigator of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, and serves on the national NSABP Working Group. Additionally he serves on the Executive Committee and the Planning Committee for the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS), and as Co-Director of the 2014 SABCS.

 
 



Speaker
AACR Outstanding Investigator Award for Breast Cancer Research

Yibin Kang, PhD
Professor of Molecular Biology
Princeton University

 

Yibin Kang (康毅滨) is a Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis Professor of Molecular Biology at Princeton University. He graduated with a bachelor's degree from Fudan University in Shanghai in 1995. After completing his graduate study at Duke in 2000, Dr. Kang became an Irvington Institute postdoctoral fellow with Dr. Joan Massagué at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and pioneered a functional genomic approach to elucidate mechanism of breast cancer metastasis. Dr. Kang joined the faculty of Princeton University as an Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology in 2004. He was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure in 2010 and to Endowed Chair Full Professor in 2012.

 

Dr. Kang's research focuses on the molecular mechanisms of breast cancer metastasis. His laboratory applies a multidisciplinary approach to analyze the molecular basis of cancer metastasis, combining molecular biology and genomics tools with animal models and advanced in vivo imaging technologies. Dr. Kang has published over 100 original articles in leading journals including Cell, Cancer Cell, and Nature Medicine. His work discovered new genes that promote recurrence, metastasis and chemoresistance of breast cancer, delineated tumor-stromal interactions that are essential for metastatic growth, and identified novel regulators with dual functions in mammary gland cell fate determination and tumor progression. Dr. Kang's outstanding achievements have been recognized by many prestigious awards, including a Department of Defense Era of Hope Scholar Award and the 2011 Vicek Prize for Creative Promise in Biomedical Sciences, a prestigious award honoring foreign-born artists and scientists who have demonstrated exceptional creativity and originality in the early stages of their careers in the United States. Dr. Kang is also the recipient of the 2012 AACR Award for Outstanding Achievements in Cancer Research, the Fuller Albright Award of the American Society of Bone and Mineral Research, and the 2014 Josh Fidler Innovation in Metastasis Research Award from the Metastasis Research Society. Dr. Kang was a member of the Board of Directors of the Metastasis Research Society from 2008 to 2012. He was elected as the President of the society in 2014 and will serve his term from 2016 to 2018.

 
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Speaker

AACR Distinguished Lectureship in Breast Cancer Research

 

Mary-Claire King, PhD

American Cancer Society Professor

University of Washington

Mary-Claire King, PhD, is American Cancer Society Research Professor of Genetics and Medicine (Medical Genetics) at the University of Washington in Seattle. Dr. King was elected to serve as 2012 President of the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG), after having completed a two-year term as a member of the ASHG Board of Directors from 2006 to 2008. She has also served on the Editorial Board of ASHG’s scientific journal, The American Journal of Human Genetics (AJHG).

 

In 1990, Mary-Claire King demonstrated that a single gene on chromosome 17q21 (which she named BRCA1) was responsible for breast and ovarian cancer in many families. Her discovery of BRCA1 revolutionized the study of numerous other common inherited diseases. The approach that King developed to identify BRCA1 has since proven valuable in the study of many other genetic diseases and conditions.

 

Dr. King’s current research employs the use of experimental and bioinformatics genomics tools to study complex genetic diseases in humans. Her research focuses on identifying and characterizing critical genes – and their interaction with environmental influences – that play a role in the development of conditions such as breast and ovarian cancer, schizophrenia, and hearing loss.

 

She has served on the National Commission on Breast Cancer of the President's Cancer Panel, the advisory board of the NIH Office of Research on Women's Health, the Council of the NIH Fogarty Center, the advisory board of the National Action Plan for Breast Cancer, the NIH Breast Cancer Program Review Group, the Board of Scientific Counselors of NCI, the Board of Scientific Counselors of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, the National Research Council committee to advise the Department of Defense on their Breast Cancer Research Program, and many NIH study sections. Abroad, she has served as Consultant to the Commission on the Disappearance of Persons of the Republic of Argentina and has carried out DNA identifications for the United Nations War Crimes Tribunal. Her lab continues to provide genetic identification services and currently serves as the DNA identification base for the United Nations War Crimes Tribunals.

 

Dr. King has won many awards and honors for her seminal contributions to genetics research, as well as her humanitarian efforts. She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the Institute of Medicine (IOM), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). King was also named as honorary chair for the state of Washington at the 50th Anniversary of the United Nations. In 2004, King was honored as the recipient of the Gruber Genetics Prize from the Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation, and she has received many other awards throughout her career, including the Clowes Award for Basic Research from the American Association for Cancer Research, the Jill Rose Award from the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, and the Brinker Award from the Susan G. Komen Foundation.

 

Dr. King holds a B.A. in Mathematics from Carleton College in Minnesota and a Ph.D. in Genetics from the University of California at Berkeley and carried out postdoctoral training at the University of California, San Francisco. Prior to joining the Department of Medicine (Medical Genetics) and the Department of Genome Sciences at the University of Washington, Seattle, in 1995, King served as a Professor of Genetics in the Departments of Molecular and Cell Biology and of Epidemiology at the University of California at Berkeley from 1976 to 1995.
 
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Speaker

Educational Session

Ian Krop, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

 

Ian Krop received his MD and PhD degrees from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1996 and completed a residency in internal medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital. After completing a medical oncology fellowship at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Dr. Krop joined the faculty of the Women’s Cancer Program at Dana-Farber and Harvard Medical School where he is now an Assistant Professor of Medicine. His clinical and laboratory research focuses on developing novel molecularly targeted therapies for breast cancer treatment and on understanding and overcoming mechanisms of resistance to HER2 directed therapies.

 
   

 

Speaker

Educational Session

Ian H. Kunkler, MB BCHIR, DMRT, FRCR

Consultant Clinical Oncologist

NHS Lothian Universities Hospitals Trust

 

Professor Ian Kunkler is Consultant in Clinical Oncology at the Edinburgh Cancer Centre, University of Edinburgh. He qualified in Medicine at Cambridge University and undertook clinical training at St Bartholomew’s Hospital in London. After training in general medicine in Nottingham, he moved to Edinburgh and trained in Clinical Oncology under Professor Bill Duncan. He spent a year as a French Government and EEC research fellow in the Department of Curietherapy with Professor Daniel Chassagne and Dr Alain Gerbaulet. He was appointed Consultant in Clinical Oncology in Sheffield, specialising in the treatment of brain tumours, breast cancer and lymphomas. He returned to Edinburgh in 1992 where he is senior specialist in Clinical Oncology for breast cancer.

His research interests are in adjuvant trials of radiotherapy for breast cancer, the development of biosensors in cancer management and the application of telemedicine in cancer care. He is Chief Investigator of the BIG 2-04 MRC/EORTC SUPREMO trial, the PRIME 2 trial and Principal Investigator at Edinburgh University in the European FP7 large scale integrating project (METOXIA) on translating the hypoxic microenvironment. He has edited two editions of Walter and Miller’s Textbook of Radiotherapy and published over 100 articles. He is a past President of the British Oncological Association.

 
   

 

 

Speaker

The Year in Review

Charlotte Kuperwasser, PhD

Director of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for the Convergence of Biomedical, Physical and Engineering Sciences

Tufts University School of Medicine

 

Dr. Charlotte Kuperwasser is the Director of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for the Convergence of Biomedical, Physical and Engineering Sciences at Tufts University School of Medicine. She is an Associate Professor Developmental, Molecular & Chemical Biology and an investigator at the Molecular Oncology Research Institute (MORI) at Tufts Medical Center. She is a national and internationally recognized expert in the fields of mammary gland biology and breast cancer.

Dr. Kuperwasser has made seminal contributions in the field of mammary gland development, breast cancer, stromal-epithelial cell biology, and stem cells. Her major scientific achievements include the creation of innovative and novel humanized laboratory models to study normal and cancer development as well as metastasis. Using these models, she was the first to enumerate the cellular origins of human breast cancer and model BRCA1-mutation in humans. Dr. Kuperwasser has also made seminal achievements in identifying and characterizing normal and cancer stem cells (CSCs) as well as enumerating the master regulators that control stem cells and cell fate decisions in the breast.

Dr. Kuperwasser received her PhD at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and was a Jane Coffin Child's Postdoctoral Fellow in the laboratory of Robert Weinberg at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research at MIT. Dr. Kuperwasser has been a Howard Hughes Fellow, a Merck Fellow and received several awards including the COG/Aventis Young Investigator Award, the Raymond & Beverly Sackler Award, and the Natalie V. Zucker Award.

 
   

 

 

Speaker

Mini-Symposium

Peter W. Laird, PhD

Professor
Van Andel Research Institute

 

 

Bio not available

 
   

 

Speaker

Educational Session

Christopher I. Li, MD, PhD

Head, Translational Research Program

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Dr. Li is a cancer epidemiologist with research projects spanning cancer early detection/screening, etiology, and survivorship. To this conference he brings significant expertise in cancer epidemiology (with 100+ peer-reviewed manuscripts most as either first or senior author) primarily focused on breast cancer, and he recently edited the first book focused on the epidemiology of breast cancer (Breast Cancer Epidemiology, ed. CI Li, Springer, New York, NY, 2010). Dr. Li also has substantial experience in the design, leadership, and completion of epidemiologic studies of cancer having served as PI of 11 active or completed projects including: 4 R01 grants, 1 U01, 1 R03, 1 K01, 2 large DOD grants (Era of Hope Scholar Award and Collaborative Innovator Award), a large NHLBI contract, and as the leader of a P50 project. In addition, he is the co-PI of the Cancer Surveillance System (CSS), the Seattle-Puget Sound Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry. Relevant to this conference, he co-chaired the 2012 AACR Science of Cancer Health Disparities meeting and is the current chair Minorities in Cancer Research (MICR) Council of AACR.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

Sherene Loi, PhD, FRACP, MBBS

Consultant Medical Oncologist

Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre

Dr Loi is a medical oncologist specialized in the treatment of breast cancer patients. She is also leads the Translational Breast Cancer Genomics lab as part of the Cancer Therapeutics program at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The principal aim of her research is to transform interesting scientific findings into approaches that may ultimately improve the clinical outcomes of breast cancer patients.

Dr Loi returned to the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in 2013 after 8 years of working at the Institut Jules Bordet in Brussels, Belgium (including a PhD and post-doctoral experience). There she gained significant experience in translational scientific research, development of novel targeted therapies, and the identification and validation of biomarkers that could potentially identify the population of breast cancer patients most likely to benefit from specific treatments. In particular, she has expertise in the application of genomic technologies such as gene expression microarrays and next generation sequencing technologies, and linking these genomic findings to early drug development using biomarker-driven early phase clinical trial designs.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

 

Sibylle Loibl, MD, PhD

Co-Chair of the German Breast Group (GBG)

German Breast Group (GBG)

Prof. Sibylle Loibl, MD, PhD is Co-Chair of the German Breast Group (GBG) one of the leading study groups worldwide. She devotes the majority of her time to clinical trial research at GBG and Sana Klinikum, Offenbach, Germany, where she serves in the multidisciplinary tumour conference. Prof. Loibl is an Associate Professor at the University of Frankfurt. She is internationally renowned in the field of neoadjuvant breast cancer, breast cancer during pregnancy and breast cancer in young women. She has developed the translational research within the GBG and is currently leading an EU-FP-7 project ("RESPONSIFY")

Sibylle Loibl graduated from the University of Heidelberg and completed her fellowship and residency as a gynaenocologist and obstetrician at the Women's Hospital University of Heidelberg and the Women's Hospital, University of Frankfurt, Germany.

She has participated and led a large number of national and international clinical trials. In cooperation with Prof. Gunter von Minckwitz she has contributed to the improvement of the infrastructure for breast cancer trials all over Germany. She serves on several international Steering Committees, Translational Research Committees, and IDMCs.

Prof. Loibl was awarded the John-Mendelsohn Prize for the best clinical trial by the German Cancer Society 2012 for the "ZORO" study.

She has co-authored more than 150 medline listed scientific papers, in addition to more than 175 original and peer-reviewed articles as well as 29 books or book chapters and she has actively contributed to more than 170 national and international congresses. Prof. Loibl is an active member of numerous national and international organizations such as ASCO, ESMO, EORTC-TRAFO, and ESGO.

 
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Speaker

Basic Science Forum

Li Ma, PhD

Assistant Professor

UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Ma is a co-leader (clinical co-leaders: Wendy Woodward and Sunil Krishnan) of the Biology Arm of MD Anderson’s Center for Radiation Oncology Research and a study section member: NIH/NCI Tumor Progression and Metastasis Study Section (ad hoc), MD Anderson’s Institutional Research Grant Program (regular), Medical Research Council of United Kingdom (ad hoc), German Research Foundation (ad hoc), MD Anderson’s Metastasis Research Center (ad hoc). She is an editorial board member: Frontiers in Genetics and an ad hoc journal reviewer: Nature Cell Biology, Genes & Development, Journal of Clinical Investigation, Journal of Experimental Medicine, Science Signaling, Cell Reports, PLOS Genetics, PLOS Medicine, PLOS One, EMBO J, EMBO Molecular Medicine, EMBO Reports, Cancer Research, Oncogene, Breast Cancer Research, Journal of Mammary Gland Biology and Neoplasia, International Journal of Cancer, Cell Research, BBA – Reviews on Cancer, etc.

In 2013 Dr. Ma received the MD Anderson Cancer Center Faculty Scholar Award.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

Ingrid A. Mayer, MD, MSCI

Associate Professor of Medicine

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Dr. Mayer obtained her medical degree from the Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil in 1993. Thereafter, she came to the United States for her post-graduate training (internship, residency, chief-residency and Hematology/ Oncology fellowship) at the University of Illinois at Chicago, between 1994 and 2001. During that time, Dr. Mayer’s received an American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Young Investigator Award in 2001 for her research project focused on the inhibitory effects of IFNα in chronic myelogenous leukemia. She returned to Brazil for two years (2001 – 2003) due to J-1 visa constraints, where she worked in a large private practice with a clinical focus on the treatment of breast cancer.


In September, 2003, Dr. Mayer was recruited to Vanderbilt University as an Assistant Professor of Medicine and member of the Breast Cancer Program of the NCI-designated Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC). She successfully completed a Master of Science in Clinical Investigation (MSCI) Program at Vanderbilt University in May 2006.

 

Since then, her academic performance has been outstanding, with an impressively strong commitment to a career in patient-oriented clinical and translational research. Her research endeavors have been focused on 1) the identification of targetable pathways in breast cancer, 2) ErbB signaling and endocrine therapy resistance in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers, 3) PI3K signaling and endocrine therapy resistance in ER+ breast cancers, 4) chemotherapy resistance in triple negative breast cancers, and 5) biomarker prediction of treatment response in human breast cancers. She has obtained several grants to fund her line of research, including a K23 Career Development Award, a Breast Cancer Research Foundation – American Association for Cancer Research (BCRF-AACR) Grant for Translational Breast Cancer Research, and co-leadership in 3 projects in 2 of the VICC Breast Cancer Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) Grants.
Dr. Mayer has been a Principal Investigator on more than 50 clinical trials, spanning from phase I through phase III trials. Of these, more than 10 are investigator-initiated trials (IITs), including two large Cooperative Group phase III trials through the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group- American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ECOG-ACRIN) and a global Stand Up to Cancer (SU2C) / Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) / Novartis trial.

 

As a key component of the VICC Breast Cancer Program, Dr. Mayer has been the director of the Clinical Core of the VICC Breast Cancer SPORE and Clinical Team Leader of the Breast Cancer Program since 2008. Under her leadership, the Breast Cancer Research Team is currently one of the top accruer of patients to VICC trials. Since 2010, she was also appointed Chair of the Data Safety and Monitoring Committee (VICC DSMC). Aside from being an active member of the ECOG-ACRIN Breast Core Committee, and the VICC representative of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Breast Cancer Panel of Experts, Dr. Mayer has been highly involved with the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC), and since 2009, she became the co-Chair of the TBCRC Endocrine Resistance Working Group (ERWG).

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

Mark M. Moasser, MD

Professor of Medicine

University of California, San Francisco

Dr. Moasser is a physician-scientist with an interest in cancer research and treatment. He has both clinical and scientific backgrounds and is particularly interested in applying the rapidly accumulating wealth of knowledge about signaling pathways in tumor cells to the development of novel therapeutic agents and ultimately much more effective agents for the treatment of breast cancer. He has been investigating the signaling pathways by which certain oncogenes such as HER2 or Src can cause cells to become malignant and how their malignant behavior can be reversed using appropriately designed

targeted therapies that specifically interfere with these signaling pathways. In particular, Dr. Moasser has been interested in understanding why the clinical activities of the current generation of HER2 and Src inhibitors has fallen below scientific expectations. His research efforts span the full spectrum from laboratory research to early phase clinical trials and routinely publish their work in numerous scientific journals.

Dr. Moasser graduated from Tufts University School of Medicine and completed his residency and fellowship training at The New York Hospital - Cornell Medical Center and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. After serving a few years on the faculty of the Breast Cancer Medicine Service of Memorial Sloan-Kettering, he moved to UCSF where he is now Professor of Medicine, and a member of the Breast Oncology Program and co-chair of the Early Phase Clinical Trials Program. Dr. Moasser is a past recipient of the American Society for Clinical Oncology Career Development Award and the American Cancer Society Research Scholar Award. He is an investigator of the National Institutes of Health, and a member of the Society for Clinical Investigation. He has presented at numerous scientific meetings including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Association for Cancer Research, and other smaller venues as well as invited presentations at various Universities and Cancer Centers.

 
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Moderator

Educational Session

Polly Niravath, MD

Assistant Professor

Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Niravath is an assistant professor in Baylor College of Medicine's Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center. She completed her internal medicine residency and hematology/oncology fellowship at Baylor College of Medicine. She is a board certified in Internal Medicine, Oncology, and Hematology.

As a specialized breast oncologist, she specializes in issues pertaining to breast cancer survivorship. I direct the Breast Cancer Survivorship Clinic at the publicly funded county clinic, Smith Clinic. This is one of the first specialized survivorship clinics to be offered in a public hospital in the nation. She provides all patients in the clinic with a treatment summary and survivorship care plan to help them better understand their treatment and the potential long term side effects associated with treatment. She also attends to the long term problems which many survivors have, including lymphedema, post-mastectomy pain syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, depression, and premature menopause.

Her clinical research focuses on aromatase inhibitor-induced arthralgia and vaginal dryness/sexual dysfunction. She has written a review article on aromatase inhibitor-induced arthralgia (AIA), which is one of the first articles to comprehensively address the issue and offer a practical, evidence-based approach to the management of AIA. She has also published an article on special issues in the care of young breast cancer survivors, including matters such as fertility, atrophic vaginitis, and sexual dysfunction. Additionally, she serves on several panels, including a joint panel with Texas Children's Hospital; they are making a national, evidence-based guideline for the care of breast cancer survivors. She also serves as a consultant for the Epic electronic medical record to construct a survivorship care plan for cancer survivors with Epic.

Her clinical experience and her research focuses mainly on symptom control, and this is her primary interest. Quality of life is extremely important for all cancer patients, and this must be carefully balanced against other goals of care, especially in the setting of metastatic disease. She recently spoke at a regional conference for the Sisters Network (national group for African American women with breast cancer) on the topic of advanced breast cancer, regarding what the goals of care should be for patients with metastatic breast cancer, and how to offer effective treatment with minimal sacrifice of quality of life.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

Ivo A. Olivotto, MD, FRCPC

Head, Radiation Oncology

Tom Baker Cancer Centre

Dr. Olivotto is currently (since 2013) the Professor and Head of the Division of Radiation Oncology at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre and University of Calgary.  He trained in Medicine (1981) and then Radiation Oncology (1986) at the University of British Columbia (BC) in Vancouver, BC, Canada.  Between 1987 and 2013 he practiced as a Radiation Oncologist at the BC Cancer Agency in Vancouver and Victoria including roles as the Chair of the province-wide Breast Tumor Group, founder and leader of the Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, Medical Leader of the Screening Mammography Program, and the Professor and Head of the Division of Radiation Oncology at UBC and the Head of the provincial Radiation Therapy Program for the BC Cancer Agency.

His clinical practice and research career have focused on improving care and treatment for patients with breast cancer with a particular emphasis on outcomes evaluation, the impact of treatment guidelines and technical innovations in breast cancer radiation therapy.  He has had a leadership role provincially and nationally in randomized clinical trials in early-stage breast cancer evaluating the role of radiation therapy including Shorter Fractionation (Olivotto et al, Radiother Oncol 1996), RT-avoidance after Breast Conserving Surgery (Fyles et al, NEJM 2004), Post-Mastectomy RT (Ragaz et al, NEJM 1997 and Ragaz, Olivotto et al, JNCI 2005), Breast IMRT (Pignol, Olivotto et al, JCO 2008), Nodal RT after BCS (Whelan, Olivotto et al, JCO ASCO LBA1003 2011), and Partial Breast RT (Olivotto et al, JCO 2013).  He has lectured and taught extensively and is the author of over 170 peer-reviewed publications.  He considers his most impactful work however, to be a book written for women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, Breast Cancer: All you need to know to take an active role in your treatment, now in its 5th edition for which he is the lead author. 

 
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Moderator

The Year In Review

C. Kent Osborne, MD

Professor of Medicine & Molecular & Cell Biology

Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. C. Kent Osborne was born in 1946 in St. Louis, Missouri. He received his AB and MD degrees from the University of Missouri, both with honors. He completed his residency at Johns Hopkins in 1974, and his medical oncology fellowship at the NCI in 1977. He was a faculty member at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, where he rose to Professor and Director of the Division of Medical Oncology. In 1999 Dr. Osborne moved to Baylor College of Medicine to develop a Breast Center and in 2005 he became Director of the new cancer center.

Dr. Osborne is a physician scientist.  His research has focused on understanding the mechanisms of resistance to therapies targeting ER and HER2 and the cross-talk between these pathways.  For 10 years Dr. Osborne was Chairman of the Breast Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group, where he oversaw numerous nationwide clinical trials investigating new treatment strategies.  He has been the Principal Investigator of the Baylor Breast Cancer SPORE grant for 20 years.  Among his previous awards are the Komen Foundation Award for Scientific Distinction and the Brinker International   Award.

 

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

Ben Ho Park, MD, PhD

Associate Professor of Oncology

Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins

Dr. Park is from Saginaw, MI and received his Bachelor’s degree from The University of Chicago in 1989. He then completed a dual M.D.-Ph.D. training program at The University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine graduating in 1995. After completing a residency in Internal Medicine and Hematology/Oncology Fellowship Training at The Hospital of The University of Pennsylvania, he finished a postdoctoral research fellowship in cancer genetics in the laboratory of Dr. Bert Vogelstein at Johns Hopkins University. In 2002, Dr. Park joined the Faculty in the Department of Oncology at The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins within the Breast Cancer Research Program. His laboratory research focuses on finding mutated or altered genes that are responsible for breast cancer initiation and progression, as well as genes that are mutated leading to chemo- and hormonal drug resistance.

   
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Speaker

Clinical Science Forum

Ann H. Partridge, MD, MPH

Director, Adult Survivorship Program

Dan-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Partridge is a medical oncologist with a specific interest in breast cancer and cancer survivorship.  She has sought to improve the care and outcomes of patients with breast cancer by conducting clinical and health services research, and more recently by developing innovative clinical programming. She recently stepped down as the Clinical Director of the Breast Oncology Program at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center to serve as the Director of the Adult Cancer Survivorship Program and spend approximately 50% of her time conducting research, 40% focusing on clinical care and administrative responsibilities, and 10% educating her peers, trainees, patients, and the public.  Her major accomplishments to date include 1) conducting groundbreaking research along with publishing several reviews and editorials that have brought to light the problem of non-adherence with oral anticancer therapy; 2) studying and subsequently developing programs to share study results with clinical trial participants; and 3) conducting research to improve our understanding of breast cancer in young women, and founding and directing the Program for Young Women with Breast Cancer at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center which has served as a model of care and a platform for focused clinical research.  Dr. Partridge has received a number of awards, been asked to speak both nationally and internationally, been invited to participate in collaborative research projects, and has served on a number of national and international committees developing a regional, national, and international reputation for her work in these areas.  In light of her prior work, she was selected to direct the Adult Cancer Survivorship Program at the Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center and has been working enthusiastically to improve this important aspect of cancer care for patients both within our system as well as more generally.  Over the past 18 months in this role, she has worked to develop models to improve the comprehensive care cancer survivors at DF/BWCC receive, and to coordinate, highlight, and lead research and educational endeavors in this growing area.

In recent years, her research and clinical practice has increasingly focused on issues unique to younger women with breast cancer in light of the fact that young women with breast cancer are more likely to suffer both physically and psychosocially after a diagnosis of breast cancer.  In 2005, Dr. Partridge co-founded the Program for Young Women with Breast Cancer and serves as the director of this novel program that has both clinical and research components.  In this context, she sees a large number of referrals, has conducted a number of clinical research studies, and has established and served as PI for the Young Women's Breast Cancer Study, a multi-institutional cohort of young women with breast cancer.  To date, they have written several abstracts and submitted applications for peer-reviewed funding to support the cohort.  Dr. Partridge has also recently been awarded a large grant from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) to develop and evaluate programs to support and inform young women with breast cancer and their oncology providers at community sites nationwide and recently served as co-chair for the first International Conference on Breast Cancer in Young Women (BCY1)

 

She spends a great deal of time educating trainees, medical professionals, patients, and the public and speaks at regional hospitals' symposia, national and international conferences, serves on an international panels which has established guidelines for fertility preservation in people with cancer and care of women with metastatic breast cancer, and has written a number of chapters, editorials, and reviews.  Locally, she has been selected to regularly see patients with her clinical fellows, residents, and medical students, and mentor formally and informally a number of junior faculty members, fellows, residents and students.  She educates her peers informally and through didactic presentations on issues unique to young women with  breast cancer, caring for breast cancer survivors, as well as concerns about adherence to oral chemotherapy, in particular, based on the research she has conducted in these areas.  Dr. Partridge serves on the Cancer Education Committee for ASCO and as Chair for the Lifelong Learning Committee of ASCO.  Her commitment to education is also demonstrated by her frequent presentations for advocacy and community groups, including underserved groups, regarding cancer survivorship and breast and gynecologic health.  Since 2004, she has led an annual forum for patients and survivors of breast cancer.

 

In sum, Dr. Partridge is a clinical innovator who has excelled at evaluating clinical questions and improving cancer care by conducting clinical research, implementing changes in care based on that research, and educating medical professionals and the public.

 
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Speaker

Special Forum

Jane Perlmutter, PhD, MBA

Founder and President

Gemini Group

Since Jane Perlmutter was breast cancer in 1985 she has been involved in a number of organizatiocommitted to educating the public about breast cancer, supporting people affected by it, aeradicating the disease.  Since leaving a fulltime corporate position in 2002, advocacy, especially research advocacy, has engaged a significant portion of her time.


Jane’s advocacy work is informed by her formal education and professional experiences. She has Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology and Masters Degrees in Educational Psychology, Computer and Information Science as well as an MBA.  She started her career as an experimental cognitive psychologist at the University of Texas in Austin, spent most of her career at Bell Labs, held a senior level operational position for a publically traded education company, and currently runs her own consulting company—Gemini Group.  Her consulting focuses on process improvement for small businesses, not-for-profits and institutions of higher learning.  She has been an examiner for the Baldrige and Lincoln quality award programs.

Much of Jane’s advocacy work concerns clinical trials including her roles as the lead advocate on the I-SPY 2 clinical trial and advocate member of the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI), Clinical Trials Summit’s Informed Consent Steering Committee, Alliance (previously CALBG) Cancer Cooperative Group, and the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC). Jane is also an advocate participant in several academic research projects funded by both federal (NCI and DOD) and philanthropic (SU2C, Komen) grants.

Jane has also worked on a number of NCI groups, ASCO committees, and is a member of the Regan Udall Innovation in Medical Evidence Development and Surveillance (IMEDS) program Steering Committee, Society for Integrative Oncology Board, and has been a stakeholder reviewer for the American Cancer Society (ACS), the US Department of Defense’s external research program, the California Breast Cancer Research Program, Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), and a member of the ACS’s External Research Council.

As a seasoned advocate with a background in experimental research and teaching, Jane is often invited not only to participate in advocacy, but also to mentor and train other advocates.  She has developed and delivered training for, among other organizations Susan G. Komen for the Cure’s Advocates in Science (AIS) program, Y-ME Peer Counselors, Coalition of Cancer Cooperatives, Colon Cancer Coalition, PanCan, and SHARE advocates. Jane has also completed a five year term as an advocate faculty member at the AACR/ASCO Vail Workshop on “Methods in Clinical Research” served as a coach for a National Cancer Clinical Trials Pilot Breakthrough Collaborative run by the Education Network to Advance Cancer Clinical Trials (ENAACT) and authored “Understanding Clinical Trials: A Tutorial for Research Advocates” which is used for training advocates in a number of organizations. She has received both a Distinguished Teacher Award from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and Outstanding Mentor Award from AACR.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

Kornelia Polyak, MD, PhD

Professor of Medicine

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Polyak obtained her medical degree summa cum laude in 1991 from the Albert Szent Györgyi Medical School in Szeged Hungary and her doctorate from Cornell University Graduate School of Medical Sciences/Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York. Dr. Polyak completed her postdoctoral training in Baltimore at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center in the laboratory of Drs. Bert Vogelstein and Ken Kinzler.

 

Dr. Polyak has received numerous awards including the Julienne Rachele Prize (1995, Cornell University), the W. Barry Wood, Jr. Research Prize (1998, Johns Hopkins University), Kimmel Scholar Award (1999, Sidney Kimmel Foundation), V Scholar award (2001, V Foundation), the Tisch Family Outstanding Achievement Award (2005, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute), the Claire W. and Richard P. Morse Research Award (2006, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute), the 27th Annual AACR Award for Outstanding Achievement (2007, AACR), the Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research (2011, MSKCC), and the 2012 AACR Outstanding Investigator Award for Breast Cancer Research. She was elected to the American Association of Clinical Investigation and to the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars in 2008, and to the AACR Board of Directors in 2010.

 
   

 

Speaker
Special Forum

Tatiana M. Prowell

Breast Cancer Scientific Lead
U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Dr. Prowell received her B.A. degree in Languages & Literature from Bard College. She received her M.D. degree from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, where she was elected to the Phi Beta Kappa and Alpha Omega Alpha honor societies. She subsequently completed an internal medicine residency in the Osler Housestaff Training Program at Johns Hopkins Hospital and a medical oncology fellowship within the Breast Cancer Research Program at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Dr. Prowell was awarded a Young Investigator Award from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and twice awarded the Pearl M. Stetler Research Fund for Women for her breast cancer research.

In 2006, Dr. Prowell accepted a joint appointment as faculty at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in the Breast Cancer Program and as a Medical Officer at the FDA.  She currently serves as the Scientific Lead for Breast Cancer in the Office of Hematology & Oncology Products at the FDA and is an Assistant Professor of Oncology in the Johns Hopkins Breast Cancer Program.  Dr. Prowell has been an invited speaker at numerous academic institutions, national medical conferences, patient advocacy groups, and television shows, and is a three-time recipient of FDA's Excellence in Communication Award.  Recently, she has helped to pioneer a pathway to accelerated approval for drugs used to treat patients with high-risk, early-stage breast cancers in the neoadjuvant setting.

Dr. Prowell remains committed to the clinical care of women and men with breast cancer and practices at the Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, where she staffs the second opinion breast cancer clinic.  Her particular areas of clinical and research interest include:  triple-negative breast cancer, development of novel agents for breast cancer treatment, neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer, and the unique challenges of breast cancer in younger women.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

&
Clinical Science Forum

Andrea L. Pusic, MD, MHS

Associate Attending Surgeon

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Pusic is a plastic surgeon at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York city. She completed a Master's degree in Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University and Plastic Surgery residency at McGill University.


Her main research interest lies in assessing health-related quality of life among oncology patients. With grant support from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, she has developed a questionnaire, the BREAST-Q, which measures satisfaction and quality-of-life outcomes among breast reconstruction patients. This questionnaire examines body image and psychological, social, sexual, and physical function, as well as satisfaction with the process of care. The BREAST-Q has been translated into 14 languages and widely adopted by other cancer centers as well as the National Health Service in Great Britain, which is using it in a national audit of mastectomy and reconstruction outcomes.

Dr. Pusic is also involved in research to measure patient expectations in breast reconstruction. This NIH-funded research is ultimately aimed at improving patient education and promoting shared medical decision making. At Memorial Sloan Kettering new breast reconstruction patients routinely complete our “Expectations” questionnaire, which helps the team better understand and anticipate patients’ needs.

In 2007, Dr. Pusic was awarded Clinical Research Recognition Award by the American Society of Plastic Surgery. Currently, she is Chair of the Clinical Trial Committee of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and lead several multicenter studies evaluating outcomes in plastic surgery.


 
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Moderator

Special Forum

Susan W. Rafte

Survivor Founder

Pink Ribbons Project

Susan Rafte is the Survivor Founder of Pink Ribbons Project, in motion against breast cancer® and is a 19 year cancer survivor. She was diagnosed with stage III breast cancer in 1994 at the age of 30, 8 ½ months after giving birth to her daughter Marika. Soon after, Pink Ribbons Project® was co-founded by Susan’s sister, Jane Weiner, and three other dancers in New York City in 1995. Just beyond one year of Susan’s original diagnosis, the cancer spread to her spine progressing her disease to stage IV -- metastatic breast cancer. Within a year after her recovery from a life-saving stem cell transplant in 1997, the sisters brought the Project to Houston. Pink Ribbons Project is the first arts and dance initiative

founded solely to promote awareness about breast cancer and help raise funding for breast cancer advocacy and education. Since the Project’s inception, they have raised more than $5,000,000 for the cause.


Susan spends most of her waking hours volunteering. Many of these hours are spent assisting Pink Ribbons Project. Susan served as the Executive Director of Pink Ribbons Project from 2005-2009. Pink Ribbons Project operates several outreach programs promoting early detection and breast health awareness in the Greater Houston Community. In addition, Pink Ribbons Project funds Pink Power, a program sponsoring medically uninsured or underinsured women and men to receive proper breast care and other initiatives that meet the organization’s mission.


M. D. Anderson’s Cancer Center has benefited from Susan’s tireless activities in breast cancer advocacy by her help in initiating a breast cancer survivor’s desk at its facility. This centralized location provides Susan and other survivors a place to meet and visit with newly diagnosed patients -- giving hope to those with a similar diagnosis. Susan is always ready and on hand to help the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in a variety of ways. She has been involved as a survivor advocate with Team Oncology – collaboration between Japan’s cancer community and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center to share good medical practices, to serve as a Tour Ambassador and an Ambassador for the Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Center. Since Susan’s original diagnosis, she has volunteered with the Anderson Network, a phone network to provide support to others with like diagnosis across the country.


Baylor College of Medicine’s Breast Center has also been the recipient of Susan’s volunteer hours. She has been a patient advocate of the Baylor Breast Cancer S.P.O.R.E. Committee since 2006. Susan has been asked to serve as a patient advocate for many of its research study grants submitted by Baylor College of Medicine as well as M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. Susan serves as the Baylor patient advocate on the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium. Susan serves as an advocate on the planning committee of the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium since 2010. Currently she is also serving as the Past Chair of the Breast Health Collaborative of Texas. In the past Susan represented Pink Ribbons Project on the Young Adult Cancer Alliance.


Susan received the honor of being named one of Houston’s 50 Most Influential Women of 2009. Rafte received the 2004 Carpe Diem Spirit of Survivorship Award from the Lance Armstrong Foundation and served on the Foundation’s 2004-2005 Carpe Diem Award Review Committee. She also received the 2002 Shining Star Award from the American Cancer Society.


Susan is married to Alan and has a 20 year-old daughter, Marika. She loves traveling, skiing, hiking, yoga, dance, music and relaxing at her family’s country place in Brenham, Texas and hanging out with her family and dogs. Most importantly, Susan is grateful to be alive!

 
   

 

 

Speaker

The Year in Review

Jorge S. Reis-Filho, MD, PhD, FRCPath
Attending Physician
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

 

Professor Reis-Filho completed an Anatomical Pathology residency at the Federal University of Parana, Brazil in 2001. Following a Surgical and Molecular Pathology Fellowship at the Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, Portugal, Professor Reis-Filho moved to the Institute of Cancer Research in 2002 to undertake a Clinical Research Fellowship in the Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Centre. Under the supervision of Professor Alan Ashworth and Professor Sunil Lakhani at the Institute of Cancer Research, and Professor Fernando Schmitt at the University of Minho, Portugal, Professor Reis-Filho completed his PhD in 2006. He was subsequently appointed team leader of the Molecular Pathology team in the Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Centre in 2006, and in 2010 was appointed Professor of Molecular Pathology at the Institute of Cancer Research. In November 2012, Professor Reis-Filho took the position of Member at the Department of Pathology and Affiliate Member of the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, USA.

 

Professor Reis-Filho’s main research interests are in the development of a predictive breast cancer classification system based on the oncogenic drivers of subgroups of breast cancer, and in the identification of the drivers of progression from in situ to invasive disease, and from primary to metastatic breast cancer based on a combination of traditional pathology methods with high-throughput molecular tools, including massively parallel sequencing. One of the programs being led by Professor Reis-Filho’s laboratory at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center is on the impact of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity on the biology and clinical behavior of breast cancers based on high depth massively parallel sequencing and single cell sequencing, and on the development of diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers that can overcome the challenges posed by intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity. Professor Reis-Filho has published over 340 peer reviews papers, and is an associate editor of The Journal of the National Cancer Institute, The Journal of Pathology and Advances in Anatomic Pathology, a member of the advisory board of The Lancet Oncology and Science Translational Medicine, and a member of the editorial board of Modern Pathology and Laboratory Investigation.

 
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Moderator

Educational Session

Andrea Richardson, MD, PhD

Associate Professor of Pathology

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Andrea L. Richardson is a Professor of Pathology at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School in Boston.  Her area of excellence is breast cancer genetics and pathobiology.  She spend most of her professional effort engaged in translational research, frequently with multi-disciplinary teams in which she both leads and participates in research projects.  She established and direct the breast tissue repository at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute and has extensive experience in tissue-based molecular assays including gene expression analysis, genomic analysis by SNP array profiling, immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and mutation detection by sequence analysis. Her laboratory research has focused on characterizing the molecular aberrations in subtypes of breast cancer important for pathogenesis, tumor progression, and tumor response to therapy.  This work includes identifying the relationship between sporadic and BRCA 1-associated basal-like breast cancer in X-chromosome abnormalities, high level of chromosome rearrangement, and response to DNA damaging drugs.

 
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Moderator

Educational Session
&
Case Discussions

Mothaffar Rimawi, MD

Associate Professor

Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Rimawi is a board certified oncologist with 10+ years of experience in breast cancer management, research and education. He has conducted and reported many research projects in breast cancer and has served on the SABCS committee for several years.

He trained in internal medicine, hematology/oncology, and breast oncology at Baylor College of Medicine.  Also performed published peer reviewed basic and clinical research.

He is an associate professor and is involved in patient care, education, in addition to research.

 
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Speaker

Special Forum

Eric H. Rubin, MD
Vice-President and Therapeutic Area Head, Oncology Clinical Development
Merck & Co.

 

Dr. Rubin has focused on cancer drug development for over 20 years, initially as a faculty member at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, then as a senior leader of the Cancer Institute of New Jersey.  In 2008 Dr. Rubin was recruited to Merck Research Laboratories as Vice-President and Therapeutic Area Head of Oncology Clinical Development.  In this role he oversees all clinical oncology research activities, including the application of molecular profiling and biomarker technologies to drug development.   

 

Dr. Rubin has authored over 100 original, peer-reviewed publications and book chapters related to oncology translational research, clinical trials and drug development.  He has served frequently as a member of National Cancer Institute and American Cancer Society study sections, as well as on program committees for the American Association of Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.  In addition, he serves on several editorial boards, and is a deputy editor for Clinical Cancer Research.

 

   
   

 

Speaker

Special Forum

Jan H.M. Schellens, MD, PhD

Head, Department of Clinical Pharmacology

The Netherlands Cancer Institute

Dr. Schellens is a board certified medical oncologist and clinical pharmacologist with basic training in chemistry and teaches oncology and clinical pharmacology at Utrecht University, Netherlands.

 

He is head of the department of Clinical Pharmacology at the Netherlands Cancer Institute, involved in translational research and early clinical studies.

 

Dr. Schellens is a member of the Dutch Medicines Evaluation Board MEB, part of the EMA and Chairperson Scientific Advisory Group Oncology (SAG-Oncology to the EMA).

 
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Moderator and Speaker

Mini-Symposium

Vered Stearns, MD

Professor of Oncology
Co-Director of the Breast Cancer Program

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Dr. Stearns joined the Johns Hopkins faculty in 2002 and is best known for her ground-breaking work on the pharmacogenetics of tamoxifen and the use of biomarkers to implement new interventions for breast cancer treatment and prevention.  Her research focuses on agents that target epigenetic modifications in breast cancer and gene methylation as a prognostic and predictive marker in breast cancer and she is internationally recognized for her research in improving therapeutic options for women who suffer vasomotor symptoms as well as elucidating the role of pharmacogenetics and tamoxifen-related outcomes.

Originally from Israel, Dr. Stearns started a 7-year medical school program at the Tel-Aviv University in 1985 through an academic reserve program. She transferred to the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, at Camden, New Jersey, as a third year medical student where she was awarded her medical degree in 1992.  She completed her internal medicine residency and fellowship training at Georgetown University where she trained under some of the most influential leaders in translational breast cancer research. During that time, Vered was one of the first investigators in the world to perform biomarker studies with novel therapies in the pre-surgical setting.

As a clinician, Dr. Stearns sees patients as an attending physician on the inpatient service and for outpatient consultations. She also supervises fellows, residents, and medical students in outpatient and inpatient services.

Dr. Stearns also leads an active research team at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and helped build the multidisciplinary breast cancer program. She was also instrumental in building the multidisciplinary translational research team and the infrastructure for innovative early clinical trials.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

Patricia Thompson, PhD

Associate Professor, Cellular and Molecular Medicine

Leader, Cancer Prevention and Control Program
The University of Arizona Cancer Center

Dr. Thompson’s interests are in the 'enablers' of carcinogenesis: inflammation and metabolic deregulation.  The laboratory works on the molecular and cellular changes that evolve during the development of tumors as targets for primary and secondary prevention. The lab focuses primarily on prevention strategies for colorectal and breast cancer with a developing activity in liver cancers.  Her work also includes integrating these targets as biomarkers for use in risk assessment to identify individuals at greatest risk for cancer/cancer recurrence to couple with tailored prevention strategies. In recent years, this has included a strong partnership with radiology/imaging colleagues for development of minimally invasive imaging modalities and their application in chemoprevention trials. 

 

Dr. Thompson is the Program Leader of the Cancer Prevention and Control Program at the University of Arizona Cancer Center and is PI of the Arizona SPORE in Gastrointestinal Cancers.  She is also PI of several early phase clinical prevention trials for breast and colon cancer.  Dr. Thompson also co-leads a multi-institutional R01 on molecular predictors of metastasis in early stage I/II breast cancer patients with a focus on patients that fail to achieve complete pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.  This is a discovery effort that includes gaining insights on the role of tumor heterogeneity and molecular alterations in primary tumors that inform on the biology of micrometastatic disease.

 
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Moderator and Speaker

Educational Session

Nicholas Turner, PhD, FRCP

Senior Lecturer and Honorary Consultant in Medical Oncology

Institute of Cancer Research

Dr Nicholas Turner is an Academic Consultant Medical Oncologist who specialises in the treatment of breast cancer. He is a team leader at the Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Centre at the Institute of Cancer Research, London.

 

Dr Turner read Natural Sciences at Cambridge University before qualifying in 1997 from the University of Oxford Medical School. After completing general medical training in London, he trained in Medical Oncology at Royal Free and University College Hospitals and completed a PhD at The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) in 2006.

 

He joined the Breast Unit of The Royal Marsden and the ICR as a Senior Lecturer and Honorary Consultant in Medical Oncology in 2008. He is a Cancer Research UK Clinician Scientist fellow and devotes the majority of his time to academic research, both in the laboratory investigating novel therapies for the treatment of breast cancer and in clinical trial research.

 

Dr Nicholas Turner is Chief Investigator of a number of national and international trials of personalised therapy in Breast Cancer. He is Breast Theme lead for the Royal Marsden NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, and on the organizing committees of many international Conferences on Breast Cancer.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

Andrew Tutt, PhD

Centre Director-Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Centre (ICR)

Institute of Cancer Research (ICR)

 

Andrew Tutt qualified in medicine from Bristol University in 1990. After postgraduate training in general medicine he trained in clinical oncology at the Royal Marsden Hospital before gaining a Research Training Fellowship from the Medical Research Council to work in Professor Alan Ashworth's  laboratory at The Institute of Cancer Research. Here he worked on functions of the BRCA2 breast cancer predisposition gene and was awarded his PhD in 2002. He cares for women with breast cancer as a Consultant Oncologist in the multidisciplinary Breast Unit at Guy's and StThomas ' NHS Foundation Trust. He is Professor of Breast Oncology and Director of the Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Unit at King's College London where he leads a laboratory programme aimed at the discovery and validation of biomarkers and potential therapy targets for Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

He has recently been appointed Director of the Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Centre and Head of the Division of Breast Cancer Research at The Institute of Cancer Research.

 

Professor Tutt has developed a translational laboratory and clinical trial programme focusing on Triple Negative forms of breast cancer and cancers associated with functional deficiencies in BRCA 1 and BRCA2 leading to the clinical development of PARP inhibitors in collaboration with Professor Ashworth. He has published papers from these programmes in the journals Nature, The New England Journal of Medicine, The Lancet, Journa l of Clinical Oncology, Cancer Research and Science Translational Medicine. He is Chief Investigator for the multicentre UKCRN Triple Negative Trial and is Global Study Chair of the 'OlympiA' study - Olaparib treatment in patients with germline BRCA 1/2 mutations and high risk HER2 negative primary breast cancer - a Triple Negative Breast Cancer trial initiative for the Breast International Group and NCI/NCG reporting at SABCS 2014. He has been a Visiting Professor at British Columbia Cancer Agency and Jean Lubrano Visiting Scholar at Harvard Medical School, and is a member of the St Gallen Early Breast Cancer International Consensus Panel.

 
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Moderator

Mini-Symposium

&

Special Forum

Laura J. van 't Veer, PhD

Professor Laboratory Medicine

University of California San Francisco
Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

Laura van ‘t Veer, PhD is a world renowned Molecular Biologist and inventor of MammaPrint®. Her research focuses on personalized medicine, to advance patient management based on knowledge of the genetic make-up of the tumor as well as the genetic make-up of the patient. Molecular genomics contributes to the knowledge of who is at risk for breast cancer, how external factors may influence this risk, whether breast tumors are likely to metastasize or not, and which subtype of tumors will likely respond to what therapy. Her current research, involving genomics data from various types, is aimed to understand the molecular basis for early response to therapy as a surrogate for outcome prediction.


Dr. van ‘t Veer is the Biomarker Committee Chair for the Foundation of NIH sponsored multicenter adaptive clinical trial I-SPY 2, overseeing the processes for FDA-IDE biomarker usage and qualifying biomarker companion diagnostic testing
.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

Jeffrey S. Weber, MD, PhD

Senior Member

Moffitt Cancer Center

Jeffrey Weber earned his PhD in molecular cell biology from Rockefeller University, New York, USA, in 1979 and received his MD from New York University in 1980. He completed his internship and residency in medicine at the University of California, San Diego, and his fellowship in medical oncology at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr Weber's experience includes clinical, research and teaching positions at the University of California, Irvine, and the University of Southern California (USC) where he was Chief of Medical Oncology and Associate Director for Clinical Research at the USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr Weber moved to the H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, in 2007, where he is a Senior Member,  Director of the Donald A Adam Comprehensive Melanoma Research Center and Professor in the Department of Oncologic Sciences.

 

A specialist in cancer immunotherapy, Dr Weber is principal investigator on several ongoing studies funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), including trials in clinical drug development, vaccines, and studies on autoimmunity and melanoma and has been funded continuously by NCI with R01 grants for 20 years. He is also the Principal Investigator of the Moffitt 'Specialized Programs of Research Excellence' SPORE grant in skin cancer. His specific laboratory interests are in the monitoring and characterisation of T cell responses in patients with cancer and the establishment of in-vitro models to facilitate the understanding of how immune modulation, via abrogating and activating antibodies, amplifies adaptive immunity. Clinically, he has held 10 investigator-initiated investigational new drug applications over the last decade and has recently pursued cutting-edge trials using gene-modified dendritic cells, intranodal injection of plasmid-peptide priming and boosting and novel antibodies, such as those against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 and programmed death-1. He has been a pioneer in the clinical advancement of antibodies that induce autoimmunity as a surrogate for clinical benefit in cancer and the management of autoimmune side effects.

 

Dr Weber has published more than 150 articles in the top peer-reviewed journals in his field including the New England Journal of Medicine, Clinical Cancer Research, Journal of Clinical Oncology and Nature Medicine. Dr Weber sat on the NCl's Clinical Oncology Study section as well as the boards of the Melanoma Research Foundation and Melanoma Therapeutics Foundation and served as a Chair of the Veterans Administration's clinical oncology study section. He currently sits on the scientific advisory boards of four cancer-related biotechnology companies.

 
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Speaker

Plenary Lecture

Alana L. Welm, PhD

Associate Member

Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation

Dr. Welm received her BS from the University of Montana in 1996 and her PhD from Baylor College of Medicine in 2000. She then carried out postdoctoral studies in J. Michael Bishop's lab at the University of California, San Francisco, which were funded in part by the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation.

 

Dr. Welm was an associate professor in the Department of Oncological Sciences at the University of Utah, an investigator at the Huntsman Cancer Institute, and a member of the Cell Response and Regulation Program. The research in her laboratory was focused on the mechanisms of breast tumorigenesis and metastasis, where they developed new, complementary in vitro and in vivo approaches to gain a better understanding of this process. Using these methods, they discovered that the Ron signaling pathway is an important facilitator of breast cancer metastasis. The areas of research included:
1. Mechanisms by which Ron and short-form Ron promote metastasis
2. Mechanisms by which Ron signaling preferentially induces breast cancer metastasis to bone
3. Pre-clinical studies of Ron inhibitors for treatment of metastatic breast cancer
Development of innovative mouse models for improved prediction of drug response in breast cancer, included a published patient-derived breast tumor graft models. With all of the projects in her lab, they made a marked effort to utilize the most physiologically relevant in vivo models possible (e.g. orthotopic mammary fat pad transplantation; assessment of spontaneous metastasis from orthtopic tumors; use of immune competent mice when possible) in addition to the in vitro mechanistic work. When possible, they validated their findings with patient samples, and often based their hypotheses on results obtained with actual tumor specimens.

 

She is a member of the American Association for Cancer Research and a member of the Metastasis Research Society.

 

Dr. Welm joined the OMRF scientific staff in 2014.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

Eric P. Winer, MD

Chief, Division of Women's Cancers

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Winer received his MD from Yale University in 1983, and later completed training in internal medicine and served as chief resident at Yale-New Haven Hospital. He subsequently was a fellow in hematology-oncology at Duke University Medical Center, and from 1989 to 1997 served on the Duke faculty, where he became           co-director of the multidisciplinary breast program. In 1997, he joined Brigham and Women's Hospital and DFCI, where he is director of the Breast Oncology Center.

For the past 21 years, he has focused his efforts on clinical research in breast cancer. As a clinical trialist, he has conducted phase I, II, and III studies with the goal of improving the treatment of women with breast cancer by defining more effective and less toxic approaches. Increasingly, these trials have also addressed translational questions in breast cancer. He directs the Breast Oncology Program at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and is the Breast Program Leader in the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (DF/HCC). Dr. Winer is the co-chair of the Alliance (Alliance for Cooperative Trials in Oncology, formerly Cancer and Leukemia Group B) and serves as Co-Chief Scientific Advisor to Susan G. Komen for the Cure. He has collaborated closely throughout his career with clinical translational, basic, and population science researchers.
 
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Speaker

Special Forum

Valarie Worthy, RN, BSN

Patient Navigation Manager

Duke University

Valarie Clark Worthy is a registered nurse and a cancer patient treatment navigator with the Duke Cancer Institute. As a treatment navigator, Ms. Worthy is responsible for establishing community partnerships to increase cancer awareness, cancer screenings and patient access to quality cancer care. Ms. Worthy is also the President and founder of Sisters Network Triangle NC, a affiliate of Sisters Network Inc, a national African American breast cancer survivorship organization for African American women with breast cancer.

 

Ms. Worthy is a research patient advocate for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium and served as the Chair Duke Cancer Institute Advisory Council 2009-2012. She is in collaborations with the American Cancer Society, Susan B. Komen Foundation, Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

John R. Yarnold, BSc, MB BS, MRCP, FRCR, FRACR

Professor of Clinical Oncology

The Institute of Cancer Research and the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust

John Yarnold is Professor of Clinical Oncology at the Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Trust, Sutton, UK. His research focuses on the role of radiation therapy in patients with breast cancer, and is chief investigator of several randomised trials, including trials testing hypofractionation. He leads translational research into the molecular basis of radiation effects, with a particular interest in fractionation sensitivity.

He is a past chairman of the UK National Cancer Research Institute Breast Clinical Studies Group, Senior Fellow of the National Institute of Health Research and Fellow of the European Academy of Cancer Scientists. Awards & lectures include the Klaus Breuer Award of the European Society of Radiotherapy and Oncology (2007) and the Emmanuel van der Schueren Memorial Lecture, European Breast Cancer Conference (2010). He is Fellow of the Royal College of Radiologists (UK), Honorary Fellow of the Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists, Honorary Life Member of the Canadian College of Radiologists & Honorary Life Member of the Belgian Association of Radiation Oncology.

 
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Speaker

Educational Session

Lucy Yates, MBBS, MRCP

Clinician Scientist

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Dr. Yates qualified as a general medic in 2004 and subsequently entered into a specialist academic clinical oncology training post in 2008 at Guys and St Thomas' NHS Trust, UK. Within this post in addition to clinical duties in the field of both radiation and systemic therapies she contributed to research projects in the field of breast cancer genomics within the Breakthrough Breast Cancer Unit under the supervision of Professor Andrew Tutt.

In 2011 Dr. Yates secured a Wellcome trust funded clinical fellowship position at Cambridge University and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute where she works within the Cancer Genome Project under the supervison of Dr Peter Campbell and Sir Mike Stratton. Her research is focused on 'The Evolution of the Cancer Genome'. Through collaboration with specialists at the Sanger Institute and several teams in Europe and the US she is privileged to lead and contribute to various studies in breast cancer genomics. Within her main research projects they have explored heterogeneity and subclonal diversification within the primary breast cancer and during breast cancer progression, relapse and metastasis. Their work provides important insights into the clinical implications and technical challenges posed by intra-tumoral heterogeneity as they enter into the era of genomics driven therapeutics for breast cancer.

Dr. Yates has presented original research and delivered educational sessions at national and international scientific meetings including the European Society of Medical Oncology Breast Cancer Conference (IMPAKT , Brussels, Belgium 2013 and 2014), The Swedish Cancer Conference (Stockholm, 2013) and ASCO (Chicago, US, 2014) - for the latter she received a merit award.

 
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Moderator

Educational Session

&

Basic Science Forum

Douglas Yee, MD

Director Masonic Cancer Center

Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology

University of Minnesota

Douglas Yee, MD is director of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota. A professor in the Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, Dr. Yee holds the John H. Kersey Chair In Cancer Research. He is internationally known for his breast cancer research and more specifically for his laboratory research focused on the growth regulation of tumors by the insulin-like growth factors. He has published over 170 articles in journals and books. He also maintains an active clinical practice In breast medical oncology at the Breast Center, University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview.

Dr. Yee has served on numerous national grant review panels and cancer research and treatment policy panels Inducting the National Cancer  lnstitute's Cancer Center  Parent Committee and the National Institutes of Health and Department of Defense Integration Panel.  Dr. Yee Is a Pew Scholar and a Komen Scholar for the Susan G Komen for the Cure.  He is also a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee for the Love/Avon Army of Women. Dr. Yee is the chair of the Scientific  Program Committee for the American Society of Clinical oncology's 2013 Annual Meeting.  Of note, in addition to the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium Program Planning Committee, Dr. Yee serves on numerous external advisory boards Including the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project and several cancer centers (University of Michigan, Baylor College of Medicine, University Of Cincinnati, and Vanderbilt University) as well as other such boards across the country.

Dr. Yee graduated from tile University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, earned his medical degree from the University of Chicago, and completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of North Carolina In Chapel Hill and his fellowship in medical oncology at the National Cancer Institute In Bethesda, MD. Before coming to \he University of Minnesota, he held faculty positions at Georgetown University Medical Center In Washington, D.C., and at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio.

 
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Moderator

Basic Science Forum

Xiang Zhang, PhD

Assistant Professor

Baylor College of Medicine

Dr. Zhang got his PhD degree in 2006 at Columbia University. His thesis work focused on the genomics of pre-mRNA splicing, a process over 90% of vertebrate genes undergo during their expression. He then joined  Dr. Joan Massague's lab and started his research on cancer metastasis. In 2011, he was recruited to the Breast Center of Baylor College of Medicine as a McNair Scholar and a tenure­ track assistant professor. His lab is currently continuing metastasis studies in breast cancer. They are especially interested in the prediction (prognosis), detection and elimination of microscopic metastases of breast tumors.

Dr. Zhang was the first author of 12 papers or manuscripts  that were and will  be published  in journals including Nature,  Cancer  Cell,  Genes and  Development , PNAS,  Genome  Research and MCB.  He also co-authored  another  10 papers published  in Cell, Nature, Cancer  Cell, Nature Medicine  and etc. He was the invited speakers of a number  of international  conferences  including the Gordon Conference on Mammary  Gland Biology (2010) and Advanced  Breast  Cancer  First  Consensus (2011). His  awards include "Thesis  with  Distinction" by Columbia University  (2006), the McNair  Scholarship by  Baylor  College of  Medicine (20I1) and  Pathway  to  Independence  Award  by  NCI  (20I0-2014). He is  ad hoc reviewer of Science, Cancer Research, RNA, Nucleic Acid  Research,  BM C Bioinformalics and Breast Cancer Research, and  is a active member of American  Association  of Cancer  Research  (AACR).

 
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